U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 01-01-2015, 10:40 AM
 
2,653 posts, read 1,383,058 times
Reputation: 304

Advertisements

The neutron is a subatomic particle with no net electric charge and a mass slightly larger than that of a proton.
Outside the nucleus, free neutrons are unstable and have a half-life of 611.01.0 s (about 10 minutes, 11 seconds).
A neutron spontaneously breaks down into a proton, an electron, and an electron-antineutrino.

The radius of an electron in the ground state of a hydrogen atom is known as the Bohr radius and is equal to 0.529 angstroms.
This is tens of thousands of times larger than the nucleus.
It is often said, therefore, that the electron is too big to fit inside a neutron.

But that is only true if the only force binding the electron inside the neutron is electromagnetism.
If a much stronger force were attracting it then it would indeed fit inside the neutron.
The only force strong enough to do that is the strong nuclear force.

Unlike all the other forces the strong_force actually increases with (and is proportional to) distance from the center.
(All other forces decrease rapidly with distance)
Gamma rays emitted from nuclei typically have energies up to around 10 million electron volts.
(2.4 10^21 Hz)

Neutrinos have only one millionth of the mass of an electron yet they have the same amount of angular momentum. This suggests that they might be rotating fast enough to produce a very powerful and energetic gravito-magnetic field.

Strangely, particles with gravito-magnetic fields would spontaneously align opposite to one another thereby canceling out each other's fields.
(Exactly the opposite of what particles with magnetic fields do)

Might this not explain some of the counterintuitive quantum mechanical behaviors that are seen in atoms? 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_pair
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper_pair

Just as a neutron can be thought of as a spinning proton plus a spinning electron (albeit a surprisingly small one) with no net electric field yet still having a net magnetic field so a neutrino would consist of a spinning negative gravitational charge and a spinning positive gravitational charge with no net gravitational charge yet still having a net gravito-magnetic field. If so then there should be quite a strong gravitational field within the neutrino.
Perhaps this is the source of the van der Waals force

Gravito-electromagnetism is fascinating but the analogy with electromagnetism does break down in one crucial aspect.
The gravitational field is not so much a field of "force" as it is a field of "acceleration".
Everything within that field accelerates at the same rate regardless of its inertial or active gravitational mass.

neutron = proton+electron+neutrino
Neutino = positive active gravitational mass + negative active gravitational mass + ?
if we could split the neutrino into its constituent parts then maybe we could use those to create an anti-gravitational effect. 
(And possibly a propulsion system too)
(It might not be necessary to completely separate the two parts. A simple dipole field might be sufficient)
Perhaps tau neutrino = electron neutrino + muon neutrino
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-02-2015, 02:46 AM
 
1,770 posts, read 1,109,217 times
Reputation: 1679
Huh??

Quote:
Originally Posted by granpa View Post
The neutron is a subatomic particle with no net electric charge and a mass slightly larger than that of a proton.
Outside the nucleus, free neutrons are unstable and have a half-life of 611.01.0 s (about 10 minutes, 11 seconds).
A neutron spontaneously breaks down into a proton, an electron, and an electron-antineutrino.
True.

Quote:
The radius of an electron in the ground state of a hydrogen atom is known as the Bohr radius and is equal to 0.529 angstroms.
The Bohr radius isn't the radius of the electron it is the average radius of "orbit" of the election in the ground state. The "radius" of an electron is roughly 0.00003 angstrom.

Quote:
It is often said, therefore, that the electron is too big to fit inside a neutron.
I have never heard anyone say that. Do you mean that it wouldn't be possible to confine an electron to a space the size of a neutron? That is due to the uncertainty principle not due to physical size.

Quote:
Unlike all the other forces the strong_force actually increases with (and is proportional to) distance from the center.
That isn't true. If it was, quarks would never be attracted to one another and there would be no hadrons and therefore no atoms. The exclusion force is a repulsive force that keeps particles from collapsing in on themselves but that is different than the strong force.

Quote:
Might this not explain some of the counterintuitive quantum mechanical behaviors that are seen in atoms? 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electron_pair
This has to do with spin statistics and the Pauli Exclusion Principle.


Quote:
Just as a neutron can be thought of as a spinning proton plus a spinning electron
This isn't true. A neutron is two down quarks and an up quark, a proton is two up quarks and a down quark and an electron is a lepton. Leptons aren't affected by the strong force. Yes, a proton plus an electron has neutral charge but that's where the similarities end. Just because a neutron decays to a proton, electron and neutrino doesn't mean that it behaves like that combination before it has decayed.

Quote:
Gravito-electromagnetism is fascinating but the analogy with electromagnetism does break down in one crucial aspect.
The gravitational field is not so much a field of "force" as it is a field of "acceleration".
Everything within that field accelerates at the same rate regardless of its inertial or active gravitational mass.

neutron = proton+electron+neutrino
Neutino = positive active gravitational mass + negative active gravitational mass + ?
if we could split the neutrino into its constituent parts then maybe we could use those to create an anti-gravitational effect. 
(And possibly a propulsion system too)
(It might not be necessary to completely separate the two parts. A simple dipole field might be sufficient)
Perhaps tau neutrino = electron neutrino + muon neutrino
HUH??? A neutrino is an elementary particle that cannot be broken down into "parts".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2015, 05:31 AM
 
2,653 posts, read 1,383,058 times
Reputation: 304
Quote:
Originally Posted by Iaskwhy View Post
Quote:
Unlike all the other forces the strong_force actually increases with (and is proportional to) distance from the center.
That isn't true. If it was, quarks would never be attracted to one another and there would be no hadrons and therefore no atoms. The exclusion force is a repulsive force that keeps particles from collapsing in on themselves but that is different than the strong force.
I can't follow your reasoning here.
I didn't say anything about repulsion.
the strong force is always attractive
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2015, 05:48 AM
 
2,653 posts, read 1,383,058 times
Reputation: 304
it may very well be impossible to split a neutrino into its parts.
I said "if we could"
And even if it isn't possible to split the neutrino we may still be able to use it to create a dipole gravitational field which might work just as well
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-02-2015, 12:52 PM
 
1,770 posts, read 1,109,217 times
Reputation: 1679
Quote:
Originally Posted by granpa View Post
I can't follow your reasoning here.
I didn't say anything about repulsion.
the strong force is always attractive
I appologize I misread what you wrote. Ignore that paragraph.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top