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Old 01-26-2015, 09:11 AM
 
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If your light fixture is rated for 100 watts, the energy saving lightbulbs will only take 23 watts or so to give off the equivilant amount of light, right? So, since the light fixture is rated for 100 watt bulbs, can you choose an energy saving varitey that takes closer to 100 watts but gives off say, 200 watts equivilant of light?
In other words, instead of using the energy saving bulbs to save energy, can they be used safely to give more light?? (for example in a poorly lit area that could use more light.)
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:02 AM
 
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You would be better off comparing an actual measure of emitted light - lumen - than watts. The watt is a measure of power, in this case power consumed by the bulb to make light.

Looking at the wikipedia page for lumen, there do appear to be CFL's that draw 100 watts and produce the lumen equivalent to a 300 W incandescent.

The power rating of a fixture is often related to the heat produced by an incandescent bulb of that rating - that may be changing, but I doubt it will for a while yet. The one LED bulb I ever tried failed after a year or so, I believe due to lack of ventilation. Even though it did not produce as much heat as the equivalent incandescent bulb, there was too much of a thermal gradient across the glass part of the bulb and it eventually broke where the bulb met the base.
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Old 01-26-2015, 10:15 PM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
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I can't stand any of the new tech bulbs - give me back my Edison bulbs.
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Old 01-26-2015, 11:38 PM
 
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I tried and research this myself but the information is sparse. I'd be careful and wouldn't go over too much, the draw on the current is not the issue. While a incandescent produces more heat most of the heat generating parts of a CFL are built into the base of the bulb and I have to wonder if it's lot more than regular bulb if the wattage is the same.
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:50 AM
 
Location: Greater NYC, USA
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A light bulb has 3 main measurements.

Wattage - the amount of energy it consumes.
Lumens - The amount of light it outputs.
Temperature - the temperature of light it produces also known as Kelvins (temperature of sun light has a range and we want to simulate that range for human comfort, LED does not have the temperature range to light up your home for example, but is good for flash lights and flood lamps. Halogen also has limitations in Kelvins).

I think LED technology will produce the most lumen for the wattage, but you want "white light", or "day light" bulbs in your home.

Last edited by DPolo; 01-27-2015 at 07:51 AM.. Reason: formating
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Old 01-27-2015, 08:21 AM
 
399 posts, read 510,354 times
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Thanks. I know I didn't have the verbage correct, but I think you get the jest of what I'm asking. We want more light in our barn, so I wondered if this was an option. But, its good to think about the heat part of it, not just the draw.
To re-do the lighting in the barn would be very costly, I was hoping to find an easier route.
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Sarasota FL
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Being that it is a barn and you want more light, have you considered narrow tube 4 foot long fluorescent fixtures? They give off a lot of light with low wattage consumption.
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Old 01-27-2015, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Greater NYC, USA
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I don't understand your problem, here are some really low teck solutions

Can something like this help you ?
http://www.amazon.com/Fancierstudio-...=bulb+splitter

How about something like this ? 2 Sockets where you can plug in more lamps.
Amazon.com: Leviton 1406 660 Watt, 125 Volt, Two Outlet With Pull Chain Socket Adapter, Black: Home Improvement

What is the square footage ? Would a good flood light fix things ?
Do you need to run a power-cord from the house ?
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Old 01-28-2015, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Auckland, New Zealand
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I'd suggest a 100 watt energy saver would produce less heat than a 100 watt incandescent. The natural light energy savers in my parts are great but they take a while to warm up to full brightness. I haven't seen one greater than 100 watt equivalent light output though. Three of them would do it.
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Old 01-28-2015, 04:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 303Guy View Post
I'd suggest a 100 watt energy saver would produce less heat than a 100 watt incandescent.
An "equivalent" 100 watt CFL might only be using 30 watts or whatever it is and will produce less overall heat. My point was the heat generating parts are in the base of the CFL bulb. That is going to more easily transfer into the fixture. If it's some cheesy fixture or enclosed that may present a problem with a larger wattage CFL. Also note if it is enclosed fixture and/or can type lighting that can more easily trap heat CFL's don't last long in that environment to begin with becsue of the excessive heat.

Last edited by thecoalman; 01-28-2015 at 05:01 AM..
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