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Old 02-13-2015, 08:11 PM
 
7,376 posts, read 12,526,857 times
Reputation: 6934

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Ive been thinking of doing this for a while. Getting a degree or cert for some type of computer technology job but am kind of lost. Im sure this has been discussed before and if so please link me.

Currently 37 so im no spring chicken. Have zero experience in the tech field. Been a state worker for 15 years in quality assurance and am finally moving to South Carolina and starting over. I have the means to go back to school full time.

I have been looking at schools near my area the past few weeks and am interested in something like sys admin or network admin. I assume it will take me atleast 6 months to get certified. But it seems every system admin has to do atleast 2 years as desktop support which i dont mind doing, but then again i have zero experience doing that either.

Just wondering the best route to take and if its even viable for me.
What kind of job and salary can i expect after doing a 6 month program at a tech school?
How hard is to learn something like this with zero experience. I mean im pretty good at navigating windows, can do some trouble shooting but thats about the limit to my skills.
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Old 02-13-2015, 10:07 PM
 
207 posts, read 173,269 times
Reputation: 196
I have no shame in my game, but don't use my hatred as something to look forward in Information Technology, since I don't represent this community. I was literally force to do Information Technology, or get kick out of the military (they said... way back when I was a naive private being force to reclass from my dream MOS *JOB* to do this retardation).... I am chalking this period of my life as hell. **You're talking to someone who join the military to pay houses, and wanted to learn a language/conduct operations, and had no interest in this field period... but God damn, they won't lick me**

You need to be hungry to do this profession, as in "never" stop researching it, doing it, living and breathing it, because it's being updated all the time, and it never stops. It comes down to hunger. Security+, I think is the holy grail to entry into this field, since if you can do that one, then A+ will be easier. I just took the test, and I fail (by like 2-4 questions). I will take it again, and I will pass it.

Study the OSI model, study ports, learn all you can about routers/switches, and how things communicate.

For you, I imagine you would make $20k-30k with at least a 1 year program ((but get certs... since that means you know your stuff)). Yet, as a state worker and all that other stuff, you should make more.

IT field is hard to crack into, since there's too much competition, and so many smart people who can do better than you. (why I hate it too... since I can never be an expert no matter how hard I try). But I just hate it with a strongest passion.

It's not hard. It's overwhelming. It's like learning a new world. Learn computers, learn CPU, learn interfaces on a computer, command prompt, ipconfig, subnetting, pinging, how the networks talk to each other, how the switches connect, the VLANs (virtual local area networks), the gateway, the router.... basic output system, bits/bytes, protocols


you want a taste?

go command prompt

do ip config

you got that default gateway?

now look it up on your browser

you're now on your router..

**if you didn't change it...should be admin and password to log in***


smurfs, honeypots, honeynets, DMZ, account restriction, account passwords, encryptions, AES, 3AES, twofish, ECC, MAC...

and it never stops... I been doing this for like 11 months now... and I still feel like I know close to nothing. It's an ancient art, back from the 60s, and I have to learn it all.


--------

to your title... far far away from IT.
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Old 02-14-2015, 06:50 AM
 
Location: HoCo, MD
3,910 posts, read 7,543,356 times
Reputation: 4109
Quote:
Originally Posted by skel1977 View Post
Ive been thinking of doing this for a while. Getting a degree or cert for some type of computer technology job but am kind of lost. Im sure this has been discussed before and if so please link me.

Currently 37 so im no spring chicken. Have zero experience in the tech field. Been a state worker for 15 years in quality assurance and am finally moving to South Carolina and starting over. I have the means to go back to school full time.

I have been looking at schools near my area the past few weeks and am interested in something like sys admin or network admin. I assume it will take me atleast 6 months to get certified. But it seems every system admin has to do atleast 2 years as desktop support which i dont mind doing, but then again i have zero experience doing that either.

Just wondering the best route to take and if its even viable for me.
What kind of job and salary can i expect after doing a 6 month program at a tech school?
How hard is to learn something like this with zero experience. I mean im pretty good at navigating windows, can do some trouble shooting but thats about the limit to my skills.
I think the ultimate choice is yours. But if you are looking to get into tech because you have a real interest - go for it. But keep in mind that tech is an extremely "organic" field. You can/will never stop learning. While the overall experience will follow you, it's those new ones that will keep you alive (until you get into management).

That said - "tech" is also extremely broad. You have software/application, hardware, engineering, operations etc. So which track are you interested? The "easiest" is likely operations (e.g. in-house IT shop). But as with anything else, the easier it is, the more competition there will be. And in todays world, its not just other applicants, but also service providers as many are outsourcing operations (and even engineering/architecture).

As I mentioned on a similar thread in Work/Emp. section - You need to have clear expectations on what you are looking to do with your education. If the investment is to broaden your knowledge, great. If the expectation is that having said degree/cert is a stepping stone to a job - you may be disappointed depending on which track you decide to venture in. This will be more true in the area of operations. Experience is generally weighed over education. This doesn't mean it's not worth it. But that investment may not give you the expected edge to start.

You may want to stay in your field, and try to "transition" into tech while looking for opportunities. This will still allow you to keep a career (unless you essentially can semi-retire). Doing that will also allow you to continue to meet and build a network of folks.
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Old 02-14-2015, 10:50 AM
 
7,376 posts, read 12,526,857 times
Reputation: 6934
Thanks both of you for the input. Looks like I have a lot of thinking to do before I decide to commit to this.
Seems like a lot to learn and a lot to take in.
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Old 02-14-2015, 11:34 PM
 
519 posts, read 555,627 times
Reputation: 950
If I knew then what I know now, I would have gone into petroleum engineering. But even that is looking a bit grim with the O&G companies downsizing. There's a lot of money there but it's subject to economic fluctuations.
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