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Old 03-20-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: China
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2011-2012 Ocean Chlorophyll Concentrations (Southern Hemisphere)

In my ignorance of this science, I noticed quite a few high concentrations of chlorophyll around the edge of Antarctica. These are not all around the edge but only in specific places. Other areas of high concentrations in the rest of the southern hemisphere are often around coastal large population cities, so I was wondering why the high concentration areas in Antarctica should appear on this map as red areas.

Could there possibly be bases at these points perhaps or undersea geothermal activity?
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Old 03-22-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Living in a Post Truth World
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocpaul20 View Post
so I was wondering why the high concentration areas in Antarctica should appear on this map as red areas.
The linked article states that 'the false color images makes the data stand out'.

Quote:
Could there possibly be bases at these points perhaps or undersea geothermal activity?
From my high school biology classes (many, many years ago) I know that chlorophyll is involved in photosynthesis and that photosynthesis is how a plant uses sunlight to make chemical energy so that it can turn carbon dioxide and water into sugars and oxygen, which is how the plant survives/thrives/grows.

Photosynthesis works on light, not on heat (although light and heat are both forms of electromagnetic radiation). So I'd say that the high concentrations of chlorophyll aren't being caused by heat vents or "bases".

Wikipedia says that chlorophyll is a pigment, which means that the concentrations might just be accumulated plant debris. Take a look at the ring at the base of the world which reaches to New Zealand, Australia and South Africa - that's an area of the ocean where there's no land masses to interrupt the wind and ocean currents. The chlorophyll concentrations may just be where floating plant debris from around the southern hemisphere winds up after it gets blow around a bit.
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Old 03-23-2017, 01:08 AM
 
Location: China
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Quote:
Photosynthesis works on light, not on heat (although light and heat are both forms of electromagnetic radiation). So I'd say that the high concentrations of chlorophyll aren't being caused by heat vents or "bases".
We are probably talking algae blooms here not a mega-load of seaweed. So, I would say that algae blooms are often found around natural river deltas, where fertiliser and sewage flows out into the sea. These are obvious signs of mans inhabitation. These outflows could well be a few degrees higher than the surrounding sea and so would present a better environment for the algae which would mean they grow and multiply faster.

Link 1 Science Daily
Quote:
Some algal blooms are the result of an excess of nutrients (particularly phosphorus and nitrogen) into waters and higher concentrations of these nutrients in water cause increased growth of algae and green plants.
Link 2 NASA This NASA website does NOT seem to take into account that these algae patches may be the result of our bases dumping stuff into the sea (although we are supposed to remove all waste from Antarctica, the sheer size of the facilities makes it impractical)

Quote:
Photosynthesis works on light, not on heat (although light and heat are both forms of electromagnetic radiation). So I'd say that the high concentrations of chlorophyll aren't being caused by heat vents or "bases".
No-one is suggesting photosynthesis is driven by heat. There are other things as I suggested above, which are produced by bases, not just heat. There are also mineral hot springs found at the sites of undersea geothermal activity, so often heat and waste/minerals may be expelled by both the things I suggested.

So, I would ask again - Could there possibly be bases at these points perhaps or undersea geothermal activity?
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