U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
 
Old 04-11-2017, 07:07 AM
Status: "On a time-out until June 26th" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Living in a Post Truth World
3,811 posts, read 3,398,158 times
Reputation: 2844

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
So then the chips are scanned by a reader, sort of like a scanner at a store's checkout counter (although that's optical scanning). Okay, when the employee leaves the company, the company's database shows the ID isn't in the system. So does the employee keep the same chip implanted, or does he have it removed ad replaced when changing employers? Seems to me new systems aren't always standardized.
No, more likely the identifier on the chip is reused.

Running off of memory here instead of re-reading the linked article in the OP, but the chip is used for more than security access at a corporate job. It's also used as a payment method at stores. Because of it's extra functionality, it wouldn't make sense to have the chip removed/replaced when you change jobs.

Think of the chip functioning as a combo personal ID and debit card. When you change jobs, you don't get a new social security card.
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-12-2017, 02:49 PM
 
4,544 posts, read 6,934,258 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
No, more likely the identifier on the chip is reused.

Running off of memory here instead of re-reading the linked article in the OP, but the chip is used for more than security access at a corporate job. It's also used as a payment method at stores. Because of it's extra functionality, it wouldn't make sense to have the chip removed/replaced when you change jobs.

Think of the chip functioning as a combo personal ID and debit card. When you change jobs, you don't get a new social security card.
Thanks! I think I get it. The chip contains an ID that is yours alone. Once it's been read and entered by a company's system, you're good to go. If you leave the company, the only thing that's removed, is the ID data in the company's own database.

At what age would such ID chips be inserted? You mentioned Social Security cards as an example of an ID that's essentially unique to you and doesn't change. Social Security recommend applying for an SS card at birth. Not sure that a debit card is a good example. Debit cards are only valid as long as you maintain the same source that issued the card. For example, if you obtain a debit card from a bank or financial institution, the card is invalid if you change to a different bank meaning that you'd need to apply for a new card.

Many hospitals and medical facilities seem to use ID cards that are swiped to open doors, etc. Most of those ID cards (that I've seen) are worn like a badge and have the employee's name written for non-employees to see the persons name. With a chip, no one except the company would have any idea who you are or that you work there, unless the company requires identifiable uniforms. If they leave the company, they usually have to turn in their ID cards.

It's hard to envision an implanted chip that transmits data. Seems that such a chip would require some kind of power source. Why bother with an implant. I would think a fingerprint, eye, or face scanner would work as well.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2017, 03:04 PM
Status: "On a time-out until June 26th" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Living in a Post Truth World
3,811 posts, read 3,398,158 times
Reputation: 2844
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Thanks! I think I get it. The chip contains an ID that is yours alone. Once it's been read and entered by a company's system, you're good to go. If you leave the company, the only thing that's removed, is the ID data in the company's own database.
Yes, that's basically the gist of it.

Quote:
At what age would such ID chips be inserted?
As it's currently voluntary, there's not set age for having one inserted, except probably that the person has reached the age of majority in his/her country and is having it voluntarily inserted.

Quote:
Many hospitals and medical facilities seem to use ID cards that are swiped to open doors, etc. Most of those ID cards (that I've seen) are worn like a badge and have the employee's name written for non-employees to see the persons name. With a chip, no one except the company would have any idea who you are or that you work there, unless the company requires identifiable uniforms. If they leave the company, they usually have to turn in their ID cards.
Yes, but any secure facility issues ID cards to their employees. I've got one myself, but now that I work at a building which isn't as secured as the others at my company, I haven't used it in years.

Quote:
It's hard to envision an implanted chip that transmits data. Seems that such a chip would require some kind of power source. Why bother with an implant. I would think a fingerprint, eye, or face scanner would work as well.
Like my ID card, the chip wouldn't necessarily need a battery. Electromagnetic inductive charging from a card reader provides the energy to active my ID card and make it transmit its ID number. It may work the same for the implanted chip.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-13-2017, 07:26 PM
 
4,544 posts, read 6,934,258 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Yes, that's basically the gist of it.
Thanks.

Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
As it's currently voluntary, there's not set age for having one inserted, except probably that the person has reached the age of majority in his/her country and is having it voluntarily inserted.
Yes, I understood that. However it wouldn't exactly be voluntary if an employer requires it, apart from if you want to work there, you would be required have a chip implanted. If you don't want to have the chip implanted, then you won't be allowed to work there.

With regard to the OP article, apparently it's being tested rather than a corporate-wide requirement.
"Epicenter, which is home to more than 100 companies and some 2,000 workers, began implanting workers in January 2015. Now, about 150 workers have them."
That works out to about 13.3% of Epicenter's workers.

The article says (regarding the technology) that it's been used for pets, tracking deliveries, "Itís just never been used to tag employees on a broad scale before." Exactly. Except for pets, it isn't implanted under the skin. You definitely wouldn't want to have an MRI scan done with such an implant.

The article also talks about (regarding implants) that people have had devices implanted to monitor heart issues, cochlear implants, etc. That's not really the same thing though, in that a medical implant devices are health or life saving devices. But as you or someone else mentioned earlier, some people have implanted objects for the purpose of body modification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Yes, but any secure facility issues ID cards to their employees. I've got one myself, but now that I work at a building which isn't as secured as the others at my company, I haven't used it in years.
I understand. I've also worked where ID cards were required for all employees, to clock in and clock out, and some employees has additional data that also allowed their card to be used as a door key. It used a magnetic strip for data.

It may be currently a voluntary thing for people of the age of consent. If the chip is to basically remain with the person it implanted in regardless of where they may work, then why not make it applicable for a wider range of uses by simply using a Social Security number as identification? Granted, not all people and/or countries have Social Security or require birth certificates. Instead, I'm thinking more as it might apply in the US. I mentioned babies because Social Security is trying to encourage registering babies at the same time a birth certificate is issued. It's not requirement by Social Security, but I think a lot of hospitals are trying to recommend it to new parents.
https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10023.pdf


Quote:
Originally Posted by djmilf View Post
Like my ID card, the chip wouldn't necessarily need a battery. Electromagnetic inductive charging from a card reader provides the energy to active my ID card and make it transmit its ID number. It may work the same for the implanted chip.
It makes me wonder. While the chip on my CC is pretty small, it's larger than I'd want to have embedded under the skin, unless the chips are even smaller, which they might be. I can think of some practical uses, such as an ID tag with name, address, phone number, etc., could be handy for older folks or kids who might get lost and don't remember where they live. Regardless, I think I'd be apt to skip it though. Among some of the potential problems in the workplace, there's the matter of giving up privacy for a certain amount of minor convenience. We've already had to sacrifice enough of that as it is. It'd have to be pretty widespread in use globally first. Using an implanted chip to open a few doors doesn't appeal to me. It's not that hard to use a card, although admittedly, cards can be lost or stolen.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-14-2017, 04:42 AM
Status: "On a time-out until June 26th" (set 17 days ago)
 
Location: Living in a Post Truth World
3,811 posts, read 3,398,158 times
Reputation: 2844
Like I said on the second post of this thread, the chip implant is currently voluntary. If it becomes a forced requirement, then I'll be alongside you on the barricades.

The concern about humans being tracked like cattle goes back to the Bible. It's all tied up with the concept of the 'mark of the beast' - the followers of the anti-Christ would carry his mark. And during WW2 the Nazi authorities tattooed identification numbers onto prisoners at Auschwitz, leading credence to the concept of a government treating people like cattle.

Since probably the 1930's, there have been some fringe theories that the government was going to force everyone to get some sort of permanent identifying number marked on their bodies. With the introduction of UPC codes on consumer products back in the 1970's, one of the prevailing fringe theories was that the federal government was going to be tattooing bar codes on everyone's forearms and that one wouldn't be allowed to purchase gasoline unless one presented his bar code tattoo for scanning. In the past few years, when Apple introduced a finger print scanner for unlocking an iPhone, there were some theories that it was part of a conspiracy to obtain everyone's fingerprints.

To sum it up, while there historically has been concern about the possibility of forced body modification for nefarious purposes, it hasn't happened here - people just wouldn't stand for it.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 07:34 AM
 
29,607 posts, read 32,844,504 times
Reputation: 23949
IMO we are heading toward a time when a computer to human brain interface is achieved thereby allowing some one complete access to all existing technology at a mere thought, a small enough chip can be implanted to accommodate this ability.will make for some interesting job applications between those that have the implant and those that dont.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 06:06 PM
 
4,544 posts, read 6,934,258 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
IMO we are heading toward a time when a computer to human brain interface is achieved thereby allowing some one complete access to all existing technology at a mere thought, a small enough chip can be implanted to accommodate this ability.will make for some interesting job applications between those that have the implant and those that dont.
Jambo, care to hazard a guess as to how long it might take to actually achieve such a scenario?
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 09:10 PM
 
Location: At the Lake (in Texas)
1,911 posts, read 1,637,654 times
Reputation: 4325
Would NEVER accept an implanted tracking device in my body, EVER, NEVER.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-17-2017, 11:50 PM
 
29,607 posts, read 32,844,504 times
Reputation: 23949
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Jambo, care to hazard a guess as to how long it might take to actually achieve such a scenario?
At a guess, within the next 50 years.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-18-2017, 09:28 AM
 
4,544 posts, read 6,934,258 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
At a guess, within the next 50 years.
Available to the general public? Or just a select few?
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $99,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top