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Old 04-27-2017, 01:48 PM
 
19,056 posts, read 14,375,922 times
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these Max Planck institute folks are amazing!

capturing and sequencing human DNA over 100K years old from soil samples - no bones needed.

Quote:
Although a rich record of Pleistocene human-associated archaeological assemblages exists, the scarcity of hominin fossils often impedes the understanding of which hominins occupied a site. Using targeted enrichment of mitochondrial DNA we show that cave sediments represent a rich source of ancient mammalian DNA that often includes traces of hominin DNA, even at sites and in layers where no hominin remains have been discovered.
Neandertal and Denisovan DNA from Pleistocene sediments | Science

they need to collaborate with this group:
Quote:
Controversial study claims humans reached Americas 100,000 years earlier than thought
Broken mastodon bones hint that Homo sapiens wasn’t the first hominin to get to the New World.
https://www.nature.com/news/controve...hought-1.21886
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Old 04-27-2017, 02:49 PM
Status: "Trying to make sense of it all" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: NW Nevada
11,614 posts, read 9,086,087 times
Reputation: 10496
Very interesting. I had always wondered why no evidence of such as the Neanderthals has never been found in North Am. There have been some things found here in N NV that have caused some consternation among the archeological community. The sites have been locked down, and everything that they have found is not being talked about publically. Not far away from where I used to live I found some stone tools made from Jasper and red obsidian that didn't match up with anything I hade ever seen from the people known to have populated the region. The Indian tribes anyway.


They were extremely crude, but obviously man shaped. I gave them to a friend who works at the University and his eyebrows went up. He wanted to know where I found them but buddy or no, I wouldn't tell him. Didn't want my stomping grounds locked off such as I had seen happen not far from where I found the stuff. And why the hush up about what was actually found when these sites were fully examined? Initially, one site was mammoth remains, but only that much was known in the end. That was because the people who found it were just hikers.


After they told the University types about it they swarmed the area, locked it up and flat refuse to talk about what they found after excavating and studying it. Of course they don't want throngs people looking to score artifacts or remains, but with the security they put up that was hardly a concern. I'd love to know what they found. But nobody's talking.


This mastodon find just gives me goose bumps. 'm surprised they're even talking about it at all after some things I've seen.
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Old 04-27-2017, 07:21 PM
 
4,547 posts, read 6,939,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
There have been some things found here in N NV that have caused some consternation among the archeological community. The sites have been locked down, and everything that they have found is not being talked about publically.
Perhaps the main reason for not talking about or revealing the locations of dig sites is to try to preserve them by preventing unauthorized people from wandering around potentially causing damage, vandalism or theft which could ruin or contaminate artifacts. These things are important parts of history. It's not just about archeologists digging up stuff. It also often involves cataloging and taking precise measurements about specific locations, depth and size of the artifacts. Many times, grids are used to help identify where the objects are (or were) within the grid. Sometimes that can help better understand things to piece together the historical and even cultural importance of the objects and the location.
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Old 04-27-2017, 09:02 PM
Status: "Trying to make sense of it all" (set 3 days ago)
 
Location: NW Nevada
11,614 posts, read 9,086,087 times
Reputation: 10496
Quote:
Originally Posted by NightBazaar View Post
Perhaps the main reason for not talking about or revealing the locations of dig sites is to try to preserve them by preventing unauthorized people from wandering around potentially causing damage, vandalism or theft which could ruin or contaminate artifacts. These things are important parts of history. It's not just about archeologists digging up stuff. It also often involves cataloging and taking precise measurements about specific locations, depth and size of the artifacts. Many times, grids are used to help identify where the objects are (or were) within the grid. Sometimes that can help better understand things to piece together the historical and even cultural importance of the objects and the location.
I mentioned that as being a possibility. But I mean they locked these places down. And it was already known where the sites were. Regardless why not talk about what they found? They put a lid on everything.
All anyone ever knew is that there was a mammoth, and the locals who found it told that much. They did call the University. Otherwise things probably would have been pillaged. Excavated with less than proper methods I'm sure.
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Old 04-28-2017, 12:36 AM
 
4,547 posts, read 6,939,947 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
I mentioned that as being a possibility. But I mean they locked these places down. And it was already known where the sites were. Regardless why not talk about what they found? They put a lid on everything.
All anyone ever knew is that there was a mammoth, and the locals who found it told that much. They did call the University. Otherwise things probably would have been pillaged. Excavated with less than proper methods I'm sure.
Were they still working at the dig site? Universities can be painfully slow to release information.
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Old 04-28-2017, 07:36 AM
 
19,056 posts, read 14,375,922 times
Reputation: 10011
Quote:
Originally Posted by NVplumber View Post
This mastodon find just gives me goose bumps. 'm surprised they're even talking about it at all after some things I've seen.
I'm honestly surprised it was published, given that it claims these smashed bones indicate human presence 100,000 years earlier than most scientists figure that humans were in the Americas. I'm gonna need more evidence than that.. which is where the DNA-from-soil comes in.

then again, if they found no human DNA at the site, that still isn't conclusive, as absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.
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