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Old 07-01-2017, 09:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
I think I can accept the odds that my house does not sit on a fault line, or that a new one will not open up under my tank. I am most concerned about the inertia of the water, because that is definite. Is a 5'x10'x8' tank likely to simply topple over? Or will the inertia bust the tank joints?
I really don't know. It depends on how well built and how well anchored it is. Can you take your design plan to an engineer to get a professional opinion?
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Old 07-02-2017, 12:00 AM
Status: "Facing East." (set 18 days ago)
 
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
1,252 posts, read 355,705 times
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I would expect a lot of water to slosh out of your fish tank in a big quake. If it's built from strong materials and good support--maybe steel framing, possibly crossed on each side--it could hold together. Though I'm sure a humongous quake could break nearly anything.
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Old 07-02-2017, 07:34 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
15,425 posts, read 46,539,769 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
The reason for this question, is that I am contemplating building a fish tank that is one floor's height (5'x10'x8'). It will be resting on cement ground, with the tank's top open to the 2nd floor. I just wonder how the tank would behave in an earthquake.
I wouldn't trust glass in that situation, and at 8' tall, water pressure at the bottom (1/4 atm. +-) would be enough to consider bracing. In general, the tank would act as a unit of that mass ( a little over 11 tons). I'd have it on a skid plate of some sort, but I also agree that something of that size needs to be properly engineered by a professional.

(FWIW, septic tanks are often that size or larger, and survive fine.)
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Old 07-24-2017, 03:10 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,042 posts, read 45,691,867 times
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So do most swimming pools.


I would be wary of that large a water tank on a standard house foundation in SoCal. I suggest checking with the town building inspector to see if such a thing is even legal. Then with an earthquake familiar engineer for a design.

I would not build an indoor fish tank that big. I would put the fish outside in the fish pond.


that water tower should be quite earthquake resistant because the support legs are not vertical and are well braced. Wood is also a very flexible and shock absorbing material. Just look at the tall trees that have withstood a couple of thousand years of California earthquakes.
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Old 07-30-2017, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
9,185 posts, read 9,702,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I wouldn't trust glass in that situation, and at 8' tall, water pressure at the bottom (1/4 atm. +-) would be enough to consider bracing. In general, the tank would act as a unit of that mass ( a little over 11 tons). I'd have it on a skid plate of some sort, but I also agree that something of that size needs to be properly engineered by a professional.

(FWIW, septic tanks are often that size or larger, and survive fine.)
It has obviously already been engineered by a professional. Look at the steel plates and bolt pattern at connection points. When structures fail, it's always the connectors that fail, not the structural members themselves. As long as the wood has not decayed, it should be fine. The engineered plans should still be on file at the local building office if anyone is really concerned.
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Old 07-30-2017, 06:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Larry, I was referring to the tank the OP wanted to build, not the tank pictured. Sorry if there was confusion.
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