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Old 07-01-2017, 06:21 AM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
441 posts, read 198,372 times
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Need a little physics here. The below picture is from Mendocino CA, right in the heart of earthquake zone.

In an earthquake (God forbid), wouldn't the huge inertia easily bring down the tower?

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Old 07-01-2017, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
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Been to that tower many times. It's been thru many earthquakes and is still standing.
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Old 07-01-2017, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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And it will continue standing until the day it doesn't.

It looks well-maintained though.
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Old 07-01-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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Nope. Vertical earth movement wouldn't do much, as the tank is nowhere near the size needed to stress the support structure. With horizontal movement, the triangular bracing is solid.

A crude and easy way to understand just how reliable that structure is is to tilt the photo to the right, first so that the support leg is vertical - still looks strong and stable, doesn't it? Next tilt it enough so that the center of mass of the tank rests on top of that right leg. It is still structurally sound even at that extreme. We also can't see how or if the bottom of the tank is attached to the platform. If it can slide a few inches, then it is even more stable.

Just a WAG, but in a worst case scenario, my be is on the tank breaching, which would leave the structure standing but wet.
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Old 07-01-2017, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
441 posts, read 198,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Nope. Vertical earth movement wouldn't do much, as the tank is nowhere near the size needed to stress the support structure. With horizontal movement, the triangular bracing is solid.

A crude and easy way to understand just how reliable that structure is is to tilt the photo to the right, first so that the support leg is vertical - still looks strong and stable, doesn't it? Next tilt it enough so that the center of mass of the tank rests on top of that right leg. It is still structurally sound even at that extreme. We also can't see how or if the bottom of the tank is attached to the platform. If it can slide a few inches, then it is even more stable.

Just a WAG, but in a worst case scenario, my be is on the tank breaching, which would leave the structure standing but wet.
The reason for this question, is that I am contemplating building a fish tank that is one floor's height (5'x10'x8'). It will be resting on cement ground, with the tank's top open to the 2nd floor. I just wonder how the tank would behave in an earthquake.
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Old 07-01-2017, 06:55 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
441 posts, read 198,372 times
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This is from the quake of 1906. So ground can travel that much. Do you think the water tower could've survived this quake? (Or did it? I'm not sure when those towers were built)

And how would a 5'x10'x8' tank fare?

[IMG][/IMG]
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Old 07-01-2017, 08:22 PM
 
17,928 posts, read 13,604,410 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
This is from the quake of 1906. So ground can travel that much. Do you think the water tower could've survived this quake? (Or did it? I'm not sure when those towers were built)

And how would a 5'x10'x8' tank fare?



Well, if a tank or other structure is built so that it straddles a fault line, and the ground on either side of the fault moves horizontally to the degree as shown in the picture, it is going to suffer major damage or be destroyed. But if the structure is built to one side of the fault and is sufficiently structurally sound, it would survive.

Last edited by Mike555; 07-01-2017 at 09:21 PM.. Reason: Changed build to built.
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Old 07-01-2017, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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That's the thing. We know where previous faults have been.

I know of no law that says that an earthquake is obligated to only use previous faults.

Modern building codes in California have saved countless structures and lives. But I think any structural engineer would tell you that you are only playing the odds, there can be no guarantee.
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Old 07-01-2017, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Mendocino, CA
441 posts, read 198,372 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike555 View Post
Well, if a tank or other structure is built so that it straddles a fault line, and the ground on either side of the fault moves horizontally to the degree as shown in the picture, it is going to suffer major damage or be destroyed. But if the structure is build to one side of the fault and is sufficiently structurally sound, it would survive.
I think I can accept the odds that my house does not sit on a fault line, or that a new one will not open up under my tank. I am most concerned about the inertia of the water, because that is definite. Is a 5'x10'x8' tank likely to simply topple over? Or will the inertia bust the tank joints?
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Old 07-01-2017, 09:19 PM
 
Location: Sierra Nevada Land, CA
6,700 posts, read 7,057,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhbj03 View Post
This is from the quake of 1906. So ground can travel that much. Do you think the water tower could've survived this quake? (Or did it? I'm not sure when those towers were built)

And how would a 5'x10'x8' tank fare?

[IMG][/IMG]
Actually said water tower tank did do well in 1906. With that said, my main concern is the wet floor from a mild shaking your fish tank would cause.
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