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Old 07-24-2017, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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A long time ago I read an article contending that the big dinosaurs were slow and clumsy. That was based on studying bone strength and structure as well as length. IMHO the authors forgot to check against living animals. I used their equations on the weight/dimensions of elephants and rhinos. No matter what the calculations concluded the elephants can walk and rhinos can run really fast even though they do not have a similar sized predator to worry about. One of the problems was the models were not based on flexible living bone with shock absorbing muscle and cartilage to reduce the peak loadings.


The dino gurus point out that the allosaur was contemporary with the plant eating hadrosaur. The former ate the latter probably after an ambush. The hadrosaur could fight back with a heavy tail used as a club. The allosaur has hollow bones and was relatively fragile.


The T. Rex lived millions of years later in a dry prairie environment. It hunted Triceratops which were big rhinos with even bigger spears on it's head and most likely traveled in herds. It also had a bone plate protecting its neck. The problem for T. Rex was it had to catch these things and somehow kill them without getting stabbed. As we have some Triceratops skeletons with T. Rex bite marks on the skeletons it is apparent that the big hunters were fast enough to catch their prey and kill it.
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Old 07-24-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: New England
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Mammalian predators evolved long canines strategically spaced to match the jugulars/ carotids of their prey. T.rex had plenty of time to evolve the same, but didn't. ??? It may not be as obvious as you think.

How many carnivourous Roos are there-- another group, bipedal with bulky tail for balance and short fore limbs?
T-Rex had to rip into armored prey, most dogs don't.
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Old 07-24-2017, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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Dogs eat armadillos when they can.
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Old 07-24-2017, 06:09 PM
 
Location: New England
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Originally Posted by GregW View Post
Dogs eat armadillos when they can.
Never seen it myself, have you?
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Old 07-24-2017, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Melbourne, Australia
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Originally Posted by functionofx View Post
Never seen it myself, have you?
That's news to me as well.
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Old 07-25-2017, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Texas
40,429 posts, read 44,430,320 times
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Originally Posted by GregW View Post
. As we have some Triceratops skeletons with T. Rex bite marks on the skeletons it is apparent that the big hunters were fast enough to catch their prey and kill it.
Bites on a skeleton only mean that at some point it chewed on it. It doesn't mean that it killed it.
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Old 08-05-2017, 09:28 AM
SFX
 
Location: Tennessee
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Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
There's the old observation: How fast does an antelope need to run in order to survive?-- just a little faster than the fastest lion... And how fast does the lion need to run in order to survive?--just a little faster than the slowest antelope.
There is another one.

Two hikers see a bear coming at them. One of them starts tightening his laces, while the other is ready to run.

"What are you doing that for, we can't outrun a bear!"

The other man says, "I don't have to outrun the bear. I just have to outrun you."
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Old 08-08-2017, 10:32 AM
 
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Default No dinosaurs allowed, unless they're a service dinosaur.

Dinosaurs were chosen for extinction, natural selection and all. . I think we have remnants in the form of gators, crocs and camain. I think Australian animals(mammals?) are throwbacks, as well as certain fish. You know that one at the bottom of the ocean that dangles a worm-like protuberance, then POW, it's Tales from the Crypt for the poor fishy who took the bait. I think we have plenty of descendants of dinosaurs to deal with, and I say that because the kinfolk we have now are not nice creatures. '
. Oh, and what about Komodo Dragons, and the Galapagos assortment of very weird creatures. Definitely a testament.
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Old 08-08-2017, 12:53 PM
 
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Actually natural selection was favoring the dinosaurs. They dominated for the planet for millions of years. Then an asteroid came and wiped them out. If anything this was natural selection on earth being undone by a greater cosmic force. I think the extinction was a random meaningless cosmic event. Asteroids were flying everywhere and some will
hit a planet somewhere.

Last edited by davidt1; 08-08-2017 at 01:41 PM..
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