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Old 10-05-2017, 05:53 AM
Yac
 
5,521 posts, read 5,778,620 times

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Have you guys considered not fighting ? I know people of science of all kinds have a long history of being petty, vindictive and aggressive towards each other.. but maybe this is one of those things we shouldn't cultivate here ? Not mocking each others and whatnot ?
Just a thought.
Yac.
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Old 10-06-2017, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
15,702 posts, read 25,327,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Elliott_CA View Post
Climate change is costly and deadly... in 2017. Climate change made hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria worse due to abnormally warm Gulf of Mexico waters coupled with sea level rise.
Strongest hurricanes in Atlantic by wind speed: Allen, Irma, Wilma - Business Insider
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Old 10-06-2017, 07:28 PM
 
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Untrue. You can't be serious. Those past events seem to show that catastrophic hurricanes and storms happened before and frequently. The Florida Keys Hurricane in 1935 produced 185 mph wind same as Hurricane Irma in 2017.
That's a time span of 82 years. How can this be? Is climate change a hoax?

Last edited by davidt1; 10-06-2017 at 07:43 PM..
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Old 10-06-2017, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
15,702 posts, read 25,327,664 times
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Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
Untrue. You can't be serious. Those past events seem to show that catastrophic hurricanes and storms happened before and frequently. The Florida Keys Hurricane in 1935 produced 185 mph wind same as Hurricane Irma in 2017.
That's a time span of 82 years. How can this be? Is climate change a hoax?
Take a look at Patricia
Strongest hurricanes in Atlantic by wind speed: Allen, Irma, Wilma - Business Insider
Quote:
With measured winds of 200 MPH, Hurricane Patricia became the strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded anywhere on Earth. Let that sink in for a moment.
By the way, over in Fairbanks, Alaska when the sun is out at this time of the year the temperature reaches from 20 to 40 degrees warmer during the day than during the night. Its cloudy right now and the temperature is around 49 degrees. The forecast for tonight is for low '30s. Hard frost on my car windshield's this morning
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Old 10-07-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
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There is increasing evidence that hurricanes are getting stronger due to global warming.

It is unclear whether global warming is increasing hurricane frequency but there is increasing evidence that warming increases hurricane intensity.

What is the link between hurricanes and global warming?

The data in these graphs is pretty clear on the increasing intensity of hurricanes.
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Old 10-07-2017, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
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Originally Posted by Matadora View Post
There is increasing evidence that hurricanes are getting stronger due to global warming.

It is unclear whether global warming is increasing hurricane frequency but there is increasing evidence that warming increases hurricane intensity.

What is the link between hurricanes and global warming?

The data in these graphs is pretty clear on the increasing intensity of hurricanes.
Perhaps that's true, but in past years we have had stronger hurricanes than now.
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Old 10-08-2017, 12:54 AM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
7,990 posts, read 2,924,152 times
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Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Perhaps that's true, but in past years we have had stronger hurricanes than now.
Thanks!

The 4 Hurricanes that you mention in your link Irma - 2017, Patricia - 2015, Wilma 2005, Allen 1980, all fall within the graph from my link as supporting evidence that hurricanes are more intense then in the past.
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Old 10-08-2017, 01:09 AM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
7,990 posts, read 2,924,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davidt1 View Post
Untrue. You can't be serious. Those past events seem to show that catastrophic hurricanes and storms happened before and frequently. The Florida Keys Hurricane in 1935 produced 185 mph wind same as Hurricane Irma in 2017.
That's a time span of 82 years. How can this be? Is climate change a hoax?
Regardless if you think it's a hoax or not the fact's show otherwise.

Regardless of how, who, or what you think is responsible for the global warming that is occurring...we can do something to reverse it.

What’s the difference between skepticism and denial? They can look similar because denial arguments are often presented as if they were real skepticism. But when you look under the surface, they’re actually polar opposites.

Skepticism is at the heart of the scientific method. A genuine skeptic doesn’t come to a conclusion until they’ve considered the evidence. That’s why it took many years for the scientific community to accept the fact that the Earth is warming because of human greenhouse gas emissions. Scientists were skeptical until the evidence became overwhelming.

In contrast, someone who denies well-established science...comes to a conclusion first, and then rejects any evidence that conflicts with their beliefs. This is a common trait found in deniers.
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Old 10-08-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
15,702 posts, read 25,327,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matadora View Post
Thanks!

The 4 Hurricanes that you mention in your link Irma - 2017, Patricia - 2015, Wilma 2005, Allen 1980, all fall within the graph from my link as supporting evidence that hurricanes are more intense then in the past.
Yes, but if global warming is accelerating, the stronger hurricanes should have been in 2016 and 2017.
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Old 10-08-2017, 01:40 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
7,990 posts, read 2,924,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
Yes, but if global warming is accelerating, the stronger hurricanes should have been in 2016 and 2017.
You have a huge misconception about how global warming plays out.

To determine whether warmer temperatures affect hurricane intensity, one study began by defining the potential destructiveness of a hurricane based on the dissipation of power, integrated over the lifetime of a hurricane. The Power Dissipation Index is found to increase since the mid-1970s, due to both longer and more intense storms. Hurricane intensity is also highly correlated with sea surface temperature.



Global warming is accelerating and hurricanes are becoming more intense. The data is there if you care to actually look at it.

Data is only as good as the measuring device being used. Technology evolves and with that comes more accurate data. The the reason more hurricanes are being observed may be due to an improved ability to observe them, thanks to aircraft, radar and satellites.

TIKE index




Global satellite data since 1981 can be used to extend analysis of hurricane intensity to each ocean, looking for any trend in wind speed (Elsner 2008 - link to paper). Figure 3 plots the long term trend in maximum wind speed (eg - whether hurricanes are getting stronger or weaker) against different strength hurricanes.




This tells us not only whether hurricanes are overall getting stronger but also how different strength hurricanes are being affected. Overall, there is a statistically significant upward trend (the horizontal red line). But more significantly, Elsner found weaker hurricanes showed little to no trend while stronger hurricanes showed a greater upward trend. In other words, stronger hurricanes are getting stronger. This means that as sea temperatures continue to rise, the number of Category 4 and 5 hurricanes hitting land will inevitably increase.


I have provided you with a lot of valid data. I suggest you take some time to understand this data.
Attached Thumbnails
NYTs: FAQs and Answers on Climate Change-hurrican-intensity-vs.-sea-surface-temperature.jpg   NYTs: FAQs and Answers on Climate Change-north-atlantic-tropical-storms-observing-techniques.jpg   NYTs: FAQs and Answers on Climate Change-maximum-wind-speed.jpg  
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