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Old 11-07-2017, 05:28 PM
 
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I'm looking for a textbook hence the emphasis on "fun."

I'm looking for a easy to read book that touches on string theory. Black Holes vs. White Holes. Planets vs. Anti Planets. Matter vs. Anti Matter. The whole fascinating galaxy and infinite possibilities. Does this book exists?
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Old 11-08-2017, 02:49 AM
Yac
 
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I'm not a huge fan of the topic, but i have a close friend who is and he has recommended me books on astrophysics from mr Neil deGrasse Tyson many times. From what a quick google search shows me, there's quite a lot of them too.
I don't think you can get more "fun" in this topic.
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Old 11-08-2017, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yac View Post
I'm not a huge fan of the topic, but i have a close friend who is and he has recommended me books on astrophysics from mr Neil deGrasse Tyson many times. From what a quick google search shows me, there's quite a lot of them too.
I don't think you can get more "fun" in this topic.
Tyson is also all over the youtubes.

Both the original 'Cosmos' featuring Carl Sagan and the remake featuring Tyson are available on youtube and well worth watching.

Another physicist who is fun is Richard Feynman. But he's considerably harder to follow than Tyson, so think of him as the upper division course that requires more advanced math.
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Old 11-08-2017, 10:12 AM
 
18,164 posts, read 13,881,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FreshFresh View Post
I'm looking for a textbook hence the emphasis on "fun."

I'm looking for a easy to read book that touches on string theory. Black Holes vs. White Holes. Planets vs. Anti Planets. Matter vs. Anti Matter. The whole fascinating galaxy and infinite possibilities. Does this book exists?
While I don't know if any one book covers all the specific areas you mentioned, an excellent, easy to read book by physicist Brian Greene called 'The Elegant Universe' addresses the subject of strings or superstrings, hidden dimensions, and the quest for the ultimate theory of everything. It addresses the subject of black holes from the perspective of string theory and M-theory. The fabric of space-time, warps, general relativity, the special theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, matter vs anti-matter are covered.

https://www.amazon.com/Elegant-Unive.../dp/039333810X
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Old 11-08-2017, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
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So much depends upon your level of education and understanding. The greater subject area is called "cosmology" and the goto starter book for many people is Hawking's "A Brief History of Time."

Tyson is popular because he makes things easy for people. Unfortunately, in doing that he over-simplifies and infers stuff that isn't correct. Sagan was far better at bringing science to the public. I can't even watch Tyson because his glib grates on me too much. I end up yelling at the screen before shutting him off.

Matter vs. anti-matter is a subset of cosmology and once you understand even a little of it the limitations are enough that you may soon turn elsewhere. Sci-fi popularized the idea of anti-matter and has played on that riff for decades, to the point that it is no longer close to reality.
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Old 11-08-2017, 08:37 PM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
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A Brief History of Time is a good place to start. I'd caution against general-interest books that focus on strings as I'd label those "speculative science fiction" right now.
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Old 11-09-2017, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Missouri, USA
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"The Science of Interstellar" by Kip Thorne covers the science in the movie "Interstellar." It's an easy read, with not just pictures by gorgeous pictures. It doesn't cover white holes, string theory, or antimatter, at least not much, but it tells much about black holes, time dilations, futuristic technology and the snazzier sorts of topics much of science fiction entertainment contains but doesn't cover in much detail.

"The Black Hole War: My Battle with Stephen Hawking to Make the World Safe for Quantum Mechanics" by theoretical physicist Leonard Susskind is probably less interesting for the layperson in my opinion, but nonetheless is intended for the more or less layperson to read. I was confused in parts of it, but the author puts a respectable amount of effort into explaining things to the layperson as best as they are able. I thought it was easier to understand than Stephen Hawking's "A Brief History of Time." It's quite fun. Hawking seems like a scientist struggling to translate his ideas into words in "A Brief History of Time" to me. Susskind seems more like a professional author, and scientist, who knows how the layperson's mind works already. The book delves into advanced topics though. The author describes a multiple decade long disagreement he and Stephen Hawking had about the nature of black holes. This one would likely be interesting for the experts too.
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Old Yesterday, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
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I recommend Neil deGrasse Tysons's new book called Astrophysics for People in a Hurry.

He also has another book called Origins: Fourteen Billion Years of Cosmic Evolution.

As stated Neil's books reach a broad audience because he want to be an educator and understands that a lot of folks are intimated by physics. He tells stories that can reach almost anyone and help them to understand the concepts of physics applied to the Cosmos.

Stephen Hawking as a good book called the Grand Design.

Lawrence Krauss and Brian Green also have some good books worth reading.
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Old Today, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 N, 🌄W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Tyson is popular because he makes things easy for people.
I think he's popular because he can tell a story better than most. He is funny and can be quite charming at times.
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Unfortunately, in doing that he over-simplifies and infers stuff that isn't correct.
He only does a tiny smidgen of this...nothing too harmful...just a bit off on when trying to apply physics to biology or chemistry. However he is a very bright and very insightful man and I truly enjoy his book and talks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
I can't even watch Tyson because his glib grates on me too much. I end up yelling at the screen before shutting him off.
WOW that's heavy. I see no glib...just a naturally silly fellow who tends to entertain himself while speaking. Nothing wrong with that.

When I feel, (the way you feel towards Neil), about the ignorance of the human race...I seek out talks by Neil and Krauss and instantly feel better.

He's certainly a very likable man.

Neil deGrasse Tyson - Interview with Larry King

Last edited by Matadora; Today at 03:25 PM..
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