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Old 02-11-2018, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Lafayette, LA
3,256 posts, read 2,435,805 times
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My dad was the very first cable customer in our hometown mid-late 70s. I canít remember the name of the company, but they were later bought out by Cox.
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Old 02-11-2018, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
6,894 posts, read 2,100,534 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crazee Cat Lady View Post
I remember that....I was a teenager and My friends family got it first and I feel in love, so begged my parents to get it...I worked a part time job and told them I would pay for it (but they decided that they would flip the bill themselves and loved it when they got it! It was seven dollars a month back then, lol!!!) (When the bill went up decades later to over a hundred dollars a month....I cut the cord, got an antenna and Roku....I like this even better than cable,but I have a few paid roku channels.)

Before Cable we had only five channels in Louisville Kentucky....now in Lexington Kentucky there are over
a twenty channels you can get over the air....plus with Roku there are literally thousands of channels.

I went from antenna to cable, at $4.95 per month, when it was first available. It carried 3 channels, two from 105 miles away and with abysmal picture quality. Seven years ago, I went back to an antenna I built myself (from Popular Mechanics plans). The cable cost about $55. per month then, with no premium or sports channels, when I made the final switch. This one indoor antenna picks up all the local digital channels and I don't have time to watch even half the programs I might record (with the DVR I bought at the same time). After I had paid $495. for the DVR, including a two-terrabyte harddrive and $10. for the antenna materials, my cost since then for TV reception and recording, has been zero. The DVR doubles as an external harddrive, when connected by USB to my computer and as a stand-alone Internet set-top box, when connected to my broadband modem.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/cul...al-tv-antenna/

Last edited by Steve McDonald; 02-11-2018 at 06:00 PM..
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Old 02-11-2018, 06:52 PM
 
3,750 posts, read 2,745,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Heh. I remember our family's first black and white tv, first color tv, then cable - which only had the existing networks plus this new thing called "HBO." HBO actually had a variety of movies!
I remember my first Betamax, first VHS, dumping cable for satellite, first tivo, and then ...
dumping satellite, downgrading tivo to only OTA channels, finding the quality of the old B&W movies often superior to color ones. If things continue the way they are, I may just end back up with only books.
Ah memories. For most of my childhood, I had a black and white Goldstar 12" TV in my bedroom that did not even have a coaxial input. I did not possess a color, cable ready TV until I was 17 which I received as a graduation gift. Oh and that Goldstar was a hand-me-down from my grandparents.

My earliest memories of playing with TV in general were of the 19" Zenith color TV my parents had in the living room. It had 2 large knobs, one for the VHF dial and another below it for the UHF dial. We received a total of 4 VHF stations and 4 UHF stations that were watchable with the set-top rabbit ears and UHF loop antenna. I remember being very excited one time when I discovered a 5th UHF station at channel 68 but no one else in the family cared. I was also curious about another 4 VHF stations that always came in fuzzy/snowy. Turns out they were duplicate network affiliates for NBC/CBS/ABC etc serving nearby cities. I did not understand the broadcasting structure at that age so I was always trying to get a better picture on those stations even though it would have been pointless.

At some point in the early 80's my parents signed up for cable and we had one of those Jerrold boxes that someone else posted a picture of up-thread. Cable was a good deal back in the 1980's but corporate consolidation has led to price increases and declining product quality. It is ironic that many of us are reverting to technology that people abandoned 25 to 30 years ago. I have an outdoor antenna array configured that gets me 63 channels and the funny thing is that now it is beneficial to get duplicate network affiliates because the digital sub-channels can vary for network affiliates on the same primary network. I receive NBC and CBS from both Boston and Portland Maine as well as ABC from Boston and Manchester New Hampshire and the digital sub-channels are more often than not different. That wasn't the case in the analog days of broadcast TV.

Last edited by AtkinsonDan; 02-11-2018 at 07:06 PM..
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Old 02-11-2018, 06:57 PM
 
Location: Living on the Coast in Oxnard CA
15,346 posts, read 25,355,703 times
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I was born in 1965.

As far back as I remember we had channels 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 9, 11, and 13. I remember as kids we used to say we had 13 channels. We never had channel 1 and channels 6,10 and 12 never came in that good.

My parents never got cable when I was a kid.

When I moved to my first long term apartment we had free cable with 24 channels that the apartments provided. For an additional fee we could get more and we never did.

First real cable set up with a box and all was when we bought out home back in 2010. Now we have over 500 channels.
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Old 02-11-2018, 07:41 PM
 
588 posts, read 117,328 times
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I remember one time in the late 80s when my aunt lived in eastern connecticut and didnt get hardily anything on her TV... Me and my cousin went up to the roof and attached a wire to this post hwere an antenna went and hooked it up to the TV....

MAN SHE GOT EVERY CHANNEL!! (2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,etc)

She was quite happy!!! (Yes antennas usually helped )
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Old 02-11-2018, 09:28 PM
 
23,831 posts, read 30,857,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouldy Old Schmo View Post
Who remembers going from three or four networks with an antenna to getting at least double that with cable?
LOL? Seriously? You must be pretty young!!

I kept cable for about 6 months and decided it wasn't worth it. That was about 30 years ago, and have never had it since.

Last edited by ChessieMom; 02-11-2018 at 09:43 PM..
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:29 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,222,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ohiogirl81 View Post
What a bizarre thing to get nostalgic about - going from free TV to a constantly escalating monthly bill.

57 channels and there's nothing on.

We never had only three or four channels - we had a giant rotating antenna that pulled in stations from three states and one Canadian province.
Nobody is making anyone BUY cable television. We still have free TV.

And ALL your three states had the same networks NBC, CBS, ABC + UHF early on. Very small differences in content. With the possible exception of PBS 1969 depending on definition. And since you go back that far, I'm sure you remember the day when most of the real content was evening - and nobody could record shows. Until the rise of cable. My grandmother never put the TV on until the evening news and NOT during dinner.

THE RISE OF CABLE

The force that would challenge the dominance of the three major television networks and offer Americans the choice of dozens and potentially hundreds of television channels—cable TV—began quietly in a few geographically isolated towns. Large antennas erected in high places gave everyone connected the chance to receive all the channels available in the nearest city. By 1960 the United States had about 640 such CATV (community antenna television) systems. It soon became apparent, however, that the "television deprived" were not the only viewers who might want access to additional channels and additional programming. In New York City, cable operators contracted to broadcast the home games of the local basketball and hockey teams. By 1971 cable had more than 80,000 subscribers in New York. Then networks specifically designed to be distributed by the cable system began to appear: Time Inc.'s Home Box Office (HBO) in 1975; Ted Turner's "superstation," soon renamed WTBS, in 1976; C-SPAN (live broadcasts of the House of Representatives), ESPN (sports), and Nickelodeon (children's programming), all in 1979. Turner followed with the Cable News Network (CNN) the next year.



History of Television


Bizarre to say that going from three channels to MANY isn't a positive.

Bizarre to say "there's nothing on". (I suspect you're not a television watcher?)

That's fine, and there's a case to be made against the government's takeover of a private enterprise like television to restrict personal freedoms and advance political agendas. And of course that television can be like hypnosis and brain Novocaine preventing individuals from actually experiencing life.

Bizarre to criticize people who are, though, on a harmless discussion about such a major life changing part of the American experience, IMO.

But that doesn't seem to be your complaint. It seems to be with content and price. Exactly what content would you like to see that can't be found on hundreds of channels? And why should it be free? Hard to understand the complaint.

DECADES ago you could watch everything from Sesame Street and TONS of other kid's programming, Rollerderby to The Victory Garden, Travel, Politics, Health, Science, Animals, Comedy, History, Masterpiece Theater, Woodworking, Cooking, Cars, Dance, Opera, Theater, Nature, Painting, This Old House, Sewing....the list is endless. And most of that list was just on free PBS!

TV History -Archive of American Television
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:31 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,222,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
LOL? Seriously? You must be pretty young!!

I kept cable for about 6 months and decided it wasn't worth it. That was about 30 years ago, and have never had it since.
Outlier.
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Old 02-12-2018, 05:59 AM
 
10,608 posts, read 13,222,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AtkinsonDan View Post
Cable was a good deal back in the 1980's but corporate consolidation has led to price increases and declining product quality. It is ironic that many of us are reverting to technology that people abandoned 25 to 30 years ago.
I don't know a single person who would say there's declining product quality. Stagnant? Maybe.

And I assume when you say cable you're including satellite.

My guess is you're not familiar with what exactly IS on.

Like every single sports event in the entire world, for starters.

My millennial son won't relocate ANYWHERE that he can't get the sports package that he wants on Satellite.

I don't know a single person who didn't cut the cord because of price. Obviously these are also people who can be satisfied with more limited content or finding the content they need /want on their computers.

So don't forget to factor in the price of that internet service in your budget.

Yes the industry is changing. And dollars are SHIFTING to new markets, not disappearing.

Netflix Has Record-Breaking Fourth Quarter In 2017, Exceeds $11B In Revenue

So it's true that cable and satellite have to work harder for their revenue. But IMO, a very limited pool of cord cutters are just using ONLY antennas.

And THAT'S why I can get Netflix on my Comcast cable box (not a smart TV, a literal Comcast option)!
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Old 02-12-2018, 07:26 AM
 
7,922 posts, read 4,329,278 times
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i still have cable, and dish, cable the only way I can get internet. I have had cable since 1972
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