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Old 03-19-2018, 02:05 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
5,576 posts, read 1,522,774 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Diogenes View Post
What is your view of life in relation to none life.

And where is the boundary between the two.
Autonomy, for the most part, as it relates to science and technology.
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Old 03-19-2018, 02:55 PM
 
27,608 posts, read 38,997,552 times
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One is. One isn't.
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Old 03-23-2018, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Germany
3,494 posts, read 642,975 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
A follow-up question: Why is there any need to define a boundary? I suspect religion or philosophy trying to intrude.
A topic about religion was what started me wondering this, yes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jacqueg View Post
I have to say, though, that I don't spend a lot of thinking about this. It seems kind of - trivial. I think it makes more sense to spend more time delving into the phenomena around us than trying to make those phenomena fit into rigid categories. The universe is simply not obligated to care about our traditional divisions.
In an everyday sense, yes, it is trivial. I am interested in abiogenesis, and I don't think the scientists working in that field would agree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jonesg View Post
I find that hard to believe , life isnt special?
As someone described it to me, it's just chemistry in a bag.

Quote:
Originally Posted by TimAZ View Post
The universe has been around for 13+ billion years. If sentient, immortal machines are possible, then why isn't the universe overrun by them?
I can think of many reasons. Intelligent life arose once; the robots don't care about traveling; intelligent life arose but killed itself off before sentient robots; usw.
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Old 03-24-2018, 09:27 AM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
17,084 posts, read 7,634,193 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Diogenes View Post
A topic about religion was what started me wondering this, yes.



In an everyday sense, yes, it is trivial. I am interested in abiogenesis, and I don't think the scientists working in that field would agree.
When I said trivial, I didn't mean uninteresting. I meant that we are still grappling with how to determine which are the right questions. There's nothing yet to be tying ourselves in knots over.
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Old Yesterday, 02:16 PM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
20,150 posts, read 18,740,536 times
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Found this article on minimum DNA bacteria interesting. Especially the Do-it-yourself section. Those bacteria are so simple in terms of DNA that scientists hope to build their own bacteria from scratch. Create life, in other words. Um, maybe they already do? The article was from 2006...

https://www.nature.com/news/2006/061...061009-10.html
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Old Yesterday, 04:34 PM
 
290 posts, read 73,598 times
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I wonder, does life exist solely for nature to more efficiently increase the net entropy of the system? It seems that way. Perhaps then that can be another definition of life -- a system contains life if it increases in net entropy more efficiently compared to a long-term equilibrium state.
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Old Today, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,293 posts, read 386,026 times
Reputation: 2915
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Diogenes View Post
A topic about religion was what started me wondering this, yes.



In an everyday sense, yes, it is trivial. I am interested in abiogenesis, and I don't think the scientists working in that field would agree.



As someone described it to me, it's just chemistry in a bag.



I can think of many reasons. Intelligent life arose once; the robots don't care about traveling; intelligent life arose but killed itself off before sentient robots; usw.
I agree, there are many possible reasons. I find it bothersome that, when looking back over the incredible time period that life has been on earth, when looking at the myriad creatures that have evolved over time only to vanish, during such staggering opportunities over time for its development, intelligence capable of producing a technology apparently happened only once. I’m not sure, given that perspective, why such a trait might be that common throughout the universe. It was a once in a eon occurrence here under what many say are ideal conditions for life.

The other thing is, because we are intelligent and it has worked for us, does not mean that intelligence is a universal meaure of success. Many other creatures are more successful than us if you look instead at numbers, biomass, length of survival over time as a species, etc.
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Old Today, 11:31 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
4,572 posts, read 1,781,029 times
Reputation: 6475
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Diogenes View Post
What is your view of life in relation to none life.

And where is the boundary between the two.
I could hold a rock in my hand and say the rock is dead and my hand is alive. But that's limited. The rock contains matter, with moving (though not to the eye) electrons and protons.

I choose to see the dynamism of the universe, and that practically everything is alive and vibrant. Just because I can't see that personally, and it acts in a way foreign to my view of day-to-day life on a larger scale, doesn't lessen its significance.

Boundaries are well-abused tendencies of man. Man loves to unnaturally divide up matters to the point of stupidity. The universe is more about connections and interconnections.

Last edited by Thoreau424; Today at 11:48 AM..
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Old Today, 11:43 AM
 
Location: West Coast of Europe
20,150 posts, read 18,740,536 times
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Moving electrons are not the same as life. Is the power cord of my computer a living being, a snake maybe?
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Old Today, 11:50 AM
Status: "Freedom - Diversity - Unity" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: Mars City
4,572 posts, read 1,781,029 times
Reputation: 6475
^ I'm considering "life" to mean more than just breathing creatures. The universe sees "life" in broader terms than our shallow minds. And I'll continue to learn about the interconnections among matter and beings, that you don't see or acknowledge.
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