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Old 03-26-2018, 05:08 AM
 
Location: Here
1,022 posts, read 339,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighSpeed View Post
Well, the follow-up Q&A session would be very interesting actually. ...you definitely don't have to be a physics major to know about the human-killing g-forces involved but the acceleration thing is a popular question that's being thrown about and I bet it would be thrown at SpaceX or Elon Musk during an interview soon.
Huh?

Musk's hyperloop involves a maximum speed of 760 mph. Do you know how long it takes to accelerate to 760 mph at a mere 0.5G? Less than a minute and a half. Do you know how inconsequential 0.5G is? You'll occasionally experience 1.5G on a commercial airliner. And even than is nothing. The hyperloop obviously allows for a linear acceleration rate.

Note that this article is not about Musk's hyperloop, which may or may not be feasible. But the G-forces of the device are as complete a non-issue as they are for commercial air travel.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Keep in mind that the SST was very limited in where it could operate. Sonic booms. Depending on the noise levels created by this method it might be a non-starter.
That's why the Concorde was effectively limited to linking coastal cities on transoceanic routes. When it flew the New York-Mexico City route, it couldn't simply bear SW like normal airliners do - crossing VA/NC/GA/AL and then out over the Gulf of Mexico. It had to head south over the Atlantic. It would then kick it down to subsonic speeds to cross the Florida peninsula before becoming supersonic again over the Gulf.
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Old 03-26-2018, 11:43 AM
 
3,799 posts, read 925,028 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighSpeed View Post
If you're talking about the teleportation that has become standard procedure in many quantum physics lab around the world according to MIT Technology Review. They've teleported something from earth to a distance as far away as an orbiting satellite.

Of course being able to teleport a whole human being is probably well beyond a century away. Now the biggest mass that I know of which has been teleported is a clump of photons

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6...arth-to-orbit/
Well, I doubt they would allow the public to even hear about the ability to 'teleport' people or materials. If that was released, it would devastate the global economy. Think about how many jobs and industries are supported by transportation of people and materials.
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Old 03-26-2018, 01:32 PM
 
25,540 posts, read 37,001,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighSpeed View Post
If you're talking about the teleportation that has become standard procedure in many quantum physics lab around the world according to MIT Technology Review. They've teleported something from earth to a distance as far away as an orbiting satellite.

Of course being able to teleport a whole human being is probably well beyond a century away. Now the biggest mass that I know of which has been teleported is a clump of photons

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/6...arth-to-orbit/
I've known people who would qualify.
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:09 PM
 
307 posts, read 199,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Huh?

Musk's hyperloop involves a maximum speed of 760 mph. Do you know how long it takes to accelerate to 760 mph at a mere 0.5G? Less than a minute and a half. Do you know how inconsequential 0.5G is? You'll occasionally experience 1.5G on a commercial airliner. And even than is nothing. The hyperloop obviously allows for a linear acceleration rate.

Note that this article is not about Musk's hyperloop, which may or may not be feasible. But the G-forces of the device are as complete a non-issue as they are for commercial air travel.



That's why the Concorde was effectively limited to linking coastal cities on transoceanic routes. When it flew the New York-Mexico City route, it couldn't simply bear SW like normal airliners do - crossing VA/NC/GA/AL and then out over the Gulf of Mexico. It had to head south over the Atlantic. It would then kick it down to subsonic speeds to cross the Florida peninsula before becoming supersonic again over the Gulf.
Hulsker, this thread is strictly about SpaceX's plans to use its BFR rockets to transport humans from city to city (e.g. New York - to - Paris) in under 1 hour, a trip that takes hours and hours using traditional airplanes.

Thanks for acknowledging about the existence of the Hyperloop however it's completely unrelated. Do try to keep your responses relevant to the thread :-)
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Old 03-26-2018, 02:33 PM
 
307 posts, read 199,311 times
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Let's keep this relevant to the OP. About the plans of using rockets to transport people from city to city.
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Old 03-26-2018, 06:58 PM
 
4,076 posts, read 2,233,258 times
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LAX to NYC in 29 minutes isn’t really interesting. Add the requisite airport time, etc. and it’s still painful.

What is interesting to me is SYD to NYC in less than an hour. That trip takes around 22 hours now when you count the layover.
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Old 03-26-2018, 11:33 PM
 
307 posts, read 199,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markjames68 View Post
LAX to NYC in 29 minutes isnít really interesting. Add the requisite airport time, etc. and itís still painful.

What is interesting to me is SYD to NYC in less than an hour. That trip takes around 22 hours now when you count the layover.
who knows. it could very well become the standard. Wilbur Wright once said "No flying machine will ever fly from New York to Paris", and he was the visionary that ****ing invented the first airplane.

...so this bids us to be optimistic at the very least!
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Old 05-13-2018, 09:31 AM
 
8,485 posts, read 8,693,585 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighSpeed View Post
It's nothing short of remarkable. However, still, I'd like to get some comments, thoughts, venting, or questions on this.
New York city to Singapore, maybe I could see flying by rocket.

But Norwegian is now flying from NYC area to Dublin, Belfast or Edinburgh in a plane with 38 US gallons of fuel per seat. I can't see most people expending the necessary fuel to power a rocket.

Need I remind people that we had a plane, the Concorde that could fly JFK to London in 3.5 hours, but used 1 ton of fuel per seat. Eventually people decided the cost was too high compared to flying the same distance in 7 hours in a bed overnight if you have the money. Even if you could get the time down to half an hour, what makes you think people will think expending 5 tons of fuel would be worth it?
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Old 05-13-2018, 11:44 AM
 
25,540 posts, read 37,001,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PacoMartin View Post
New York city to Singapore, maybe I could see flying by rocket.

But Norwegian is now flying from NYC area to Dublin, Belfast or Edinburgh in a plane with 38 US gallons of fuel per seat. I can't see most people expending the necessary fuel to power a rocket.

Need I remind people that we had a plane, the Concorde that could fly JFK to London in 3.5 hours, but used 1 ton of fuel per seat. Eventually people decided the cost was too high compared to flying the same distance in 7 hours in a bed overnight if you have the money. Even if you could get the time down to half an hour, what makes you think people will think expending 5 tons of fuel would be worth it?
People with money. If the rich will pay for it a company will try to make a profit on it.
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