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Old Today, 05:03 AM
 
95 posts, read 33,869 times
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I have already gone through the book "MatLab: An Introduction With Applications, 4th Edition" by Amos Gilat, and that was a great introductory textbook.
However, I also of course realise that there are lots of things that aren't covered in that book, so do you know where I can go from here if I want to learn as much as possible about the topics that you are likely to run into in an Engineering Physics program?
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Old Today, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Westwood, MA
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Find a project. That's absolutely the best way to learn Matlab. Are you in an Engineering Physics program? See if you can find a professor who needs something done. If not, find something that is challenging and interesting and make it.

Honestly, though, I wouldn't put too much time into mastering Matlab. It's useful, but python is where the growth will be in the next 20 years.
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