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Old 03-11-2019, 06:42 PM
 
6,041 posts, read 1,740,428 times
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There's a new book:

The Uninhabitable Earth: Life After Warming
By David Wallace-Wells,

and PBS did an interview with the author:

https://qa.pbs.org/video/david-wallace-wells-severity-climate-change-ot0rdx/

and they consider it such an important book that they're posting the first chapter on their website:

https://www.pbs.org/newshour/arts/read-a-chapter-from-the-uninhabitable-earth-a-dire-warning-on-climate-change?ref=hvper.com
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Old 03-12-2019, 09:03 AM
 
12,747 posts, read 15,065,041 times
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good for them...so called climate change is a naturally occurring event in my mind...if you can even call it an event.

I don't know what the big worry is when we can't even acknowledge the damage done by nuclear power plants like the Fukishima and Chernoble disasters.
Nuclear power plants leave much more to be concerned about (in my opinion) as the devastation from them is truly horrific, and still happening now, and probably will continue.
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Old 03-14-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,427 posts, read 31,289,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by purehuman View Post
good for them...so called climate change is a naturally occurring event in my mind...if you can even call it an event.

I don't know what the big worry is when we can't even acknowledge the damage done by nuclear power plants like the Fukishima and Chernoble disasters.
Nuclear power plants leave much more to be concerned about (in my opinion) as the devastation from them is truly horrific, and still happening now, and probably will continue.
Those were minor events compared to what humans are doing to the planet....Global warming has heated the oceans by the equivalent of one atomic bomb explosion per second for the past 150 years, according to analysis of new research.

https://www.theguardian.com/environm...omb-per-second
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:49 PM
 
339 posts, read 84,330 times
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It's a big planet and has been heated to much higher temperature ranges before. Once we humans die out, the planet's biosphere will gradually return to normal after a few thousand years and new life forms will start evolve. Who knows, a new species of sapient creatures may even arise, then wonder about us and learn new lessons.
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Old 03-16-2019, 04:07 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,405 posts, read 28,218,869 times
Reputation: 12099
Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
It's a big planet and has been heated to much higher temperature ranges before. Once we humans die out, the planet's biosphere will gradually return to normal after a few thousand years and new life forms will start evolve. Who knows, a new species of sapient creatures may even arise, then wonder about us and learn new lessons.


Over in Alaska the remains of forests are still being found under areas that have been covered by ice for thousands of years, so I imagine that these parts of the world have been quite warm in the past.

Here is another example:
https://www.livescience.com/52867-ph...il-forest.html
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Old 03-16-2019, 11:24 PM
 
Location: Victoria, BC.
30,427 posts, read 31,289,755 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post


Over in Alaska the remains of forests are still being found under areas that have been covered by ice for thousands of years, so I imagine that these parts of the world have been quite warm in the past.

Here is another example:
https://www.livescience.com/52867-ph...il-forest.html
You realize that in pre-history Alaska has not always been located where it is now, right?
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Old Yesterday, 12:34 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,538 posts, read 883,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sanspeur View Post
...Global warming has heated the oceans ...

When you boil water, do you put the pan over the flame?...Or under it?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rjshae View Post
... Once we humans die out, the planet's biosphere will gradually return to normal ....

Good post...But what's "normal?"

Quote:
Originally Posted by sanspeur View Post
You realize that in pre-history Alaska has not always been located where it is now, right?

Point well taken...However: as Alpine glaciers have receded in recent years, long dead tree stumps dated to the Roman Warm Period have been exposed. Those trees didn't germinate under the glaciers.


Odd, but Julius Caesar didn't mention glaciers in his Commentaries, although he had to cross the Alps with his troops several times and he was quite explicit & complete about describing the natural history & various natural phenomena he encountered on his exploits north of Italy....And Europe hasn't wandered a whole lot in the last 2000 yrs...


..Two and a half centuries before Caesar, Hannibal lost most of his troops and almost all of his elephants in the bitter cold & snow trying to cross those same Alps.


Weather & climate are naturally cyclic. We're not seeing anything we haven't seen before-- many times.
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Old Today, 01:03 PM
 
339 posts, read 84,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Good post...But what's "normal?"

Radiative forcing returns to an equilibrium state with all influences being caused by non-human factors.
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Old Today, 01:12 PM
 
339 posts, read 84,330 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Weather & climate are naturally cyclic. We're not seeing anything we haven't seen before-- many times.
Not quite. Yes, climate change is normal. What's different is the rate of change. Rapid change introduces environmental stressors that can disrupt the ecosystem and lead to mass extinctions. The biggest danger is that we reach an ecological tipping point, such as from a mass release of methane from the arctic tundra. That's why I think we should be investigating ideas like geoengineering techniques for removal of extreme methane excess.
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