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Old 03-28-2019, 01:47 PM
 
162 posts, read 60,611 times
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In the classic video game "Final Fantasy 7" there is a special attack during the final battle where a supernova travels through the entire solar system, and at one point it smashes through Jupiter, which makes Jupiter explode - like at 0:58 in this video:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTc9sLmOR0A&t=58s

Is this something that would happen in real life if we could somehow remove Jupiter's core?
Or is it just some artistic liberties?

Personally I feel that it's probably just there for dramatic effect, and that the real consequences would most likely be that the gases of Jupiter got diffused.
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Old 03-28-2019, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,904 posts, read 2,087,015 times
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If the core of a a planetary-sized body simply vanished, the remaining shell would implode. Unless M. Verne had really strong dinosaurs holding things up.

There would probably be a host of collateral issues involving orbital change and rebound of the shell masses, but that's about it. In the comparative blink of an eye, you'd have a smaller, very rubbly planet, probably with a halo of dust and rocks, and possibly shifting into a different orbit.
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Old 03-29-2019, 03:11 PM
 
162 posts, read 60,611 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
If the core of a a planetary-sized body simply vanished, the remaining shell would implode. Unless M. Verne had really strong dinosaurs holding things up.

There would probably be a host of collateral issues involving orbital change and rebound of the shell masses, but that's about it. In the comparative blink of an eye, you'd have a smaller, very rubbly planet, probably with a halo of dust and rocks, and possibly shifting into a different orbit.
Yeah, I highly doubt that it would explode like in that video, but that was probably meant as a dramatic effect.
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Old 03-29-2019, 05:18 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markus86 View Post
Yeah, I highly doubt that it would explode like in that video, but that was probably meant as a dramatic effect.
In a video game cut scene? Nah.
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Old 03-30-2019, 06:02 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
In a video game cut scene? Nah.
The entire Super Nova attack is pretty ridiculous, actually - you have this insane attack where a supernova blast travels through the entire solar system and destroys everything in its path, and then it just causes major damage to the characters.
You would assume that an attack like that was at least as powerful as Judgement Day in Final Fantasy 10, which completely destroys the entire party and leaves you hoping that you have Auto-Life or something on them.

One thing that does seem to make sense in the Super Nova attack though are the physics equations;
they seem surprisingly correct for the most part, considering how most people would assume that they were just there for decoration.
And you do after all need to have a very good understanding for math and physics to be able to create a 3-dimensional video game.
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Old 04-02-2019, 04:28 PM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,210 posts, read 799,766 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markus86 View Post
In the classic video game "Final Fantasy 7" there is a special attack during the final battle where a supernova travels through the entire solar system, and at one point it smashes through Jupiter, which makes Jupiter explode - like at 0:58 in this video:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTc9sLmOR0A&t=58s

Is this something that would happen in real life if we could somehow remove Jupiter's core?
Or is it just some artistic liberties?

Personally I feel that it's probably just there for dramatic effect, and that the real consequences would most likely be that the gases of Jupiter got diffused.
1) A supernova that 'travels through' the solar system really doesn't make sense. A supernova is explosion (more or less) of a star. One could affect our solar system, but the supernova itself would not travel through our solar system.

2) A supernova could not make a planet's core disappear, not a planet explode.

3) The effects of a supernova would be invisible to the human eye. They might include (for a relatively close supernova, which occur only once ever several hundred million years) invisible changes to the atmosphere which would make life on Earth vulnerable to extraterrestrial radiation. These are indirect effects which would play out over months and years.
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Old Today, 02:54 PM
 
1,638 posts, read 2,487,658 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Markus86 View Post
In the classic video game "Final Fantasy 7" there is a special attack during the final battle where a supernova travels through the entire solar system, and at one point it smashes through Jupiter, which makes Jupiter explode - like at 0:58 in this video:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTc9sLmOR0A&t=58s

Is this something that would happen in real life if we could somehow remove Jupiter's core?
Or is it just some artistic liberties?

Personally I feel that it's probably just there for dramatic effect, and that the real consequences would most likely be that the gases of Jupiter got diffused.
I say as a big fan of that game as well as a huge space geek, they took a lot of artistic liberties with that attack sequence.

A few things:

1) the object that destroys Jupiter is a comet I believe, not a supernova. The comet plows through the outer planets and hits the star causing it to go supernova and damage the characters.

2) a comet (shoemaker levy) actually did collide with Jupiter back in 1994 and Jupiter gobbled it up. Now, if a celestial body large enough to punch a hole clean through Jupiter actually did hit it, both objects would blow apart to create a huge debris field that would coelesce back into a new body after a set period of time.

3) to answer your question, are you talking about destroying a planetís core like what I mentioned above or are you talking like making a core disappear like wave a wizardís wand and ďabbra kadabbraĒ disappear? If weíre talking magic wands fantasy then things like mass, composition, and spin would all play a role in what would happen. For a planet like Jupiter, it might swell up quite a bit because itís composition is primarily gasses. Without the mass and gravity of the core holding it together it would swell. If it had a crazy spin like something like a neutron star then it might fly apart but it doesnít (if it had a spin like a neutron start then it would probably fly apart as it is now anyway even with the core). The magnetic field would also disappear with the core and Jupiterís moons would certainly change their orbits too. A few might even fly away due to the sudden loss of gravity.

If that sequence was scientifically accurate then it would end with Pluto and the comet both blowing up but itís a fantasy game so Iíll forgive it... this time
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