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Old 07-11-2019, 06:30 AM
 
5,211 posts, read 2,342,563 times
Reputation: 14896

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
You're probably correct, there goes two minutes of my life, sigh. I went back and re-read the answers others gave him and saw that he's not really looking for the formula required to do the calculation, he's trying to figure out how to express it in Excel, which is really a different question than the one I answered with the link anyway. I'm no Excel expert, but I've seen this done by others - I think it's a pretty standard macro he's looking to accomplish, probably available in an Excel tutorial on You Tube, I would think. The internet has really spoiled me to the point where I was able to retire without having to do my own cipherin' anymore, LOL. During my career, I had little practical use for calculus, quite a bit for algebra, and knowing trig was essential.

Kids, Math truly is Necessary, unless you want to spend your working years asking whether your customer wants fries with his order. You can look stuff up on the web, but unless you fully understand all the concepts, it's all Greek.
I'll say it again. No calculus is needed to derive the formula for the area of a partial circle. You don't even need to derive it at all, as it's readily available by a Google search, which took me less than 2 minutes. It's kind of a lengthy formula which means you have to be careful in typing it in so all your parentheses line up correctly.


Use the diameter of the tank and its length and type in the formula in Excel just like you would any other Excel formula. No macros. No need for Excel tutorials.


Done!


OP apparently did not want to do this. It was not clear to me whether OP actually understood the process of determining the volume of water in a cylindrical tank lying on its side, but at any rate, he clearly wanted to be given a fish rather than being taught how to fish.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:27 AM
 
Location: McAllen, TX
3,568 posts, read 2,393,349 times
Reputation: 4246
We'll never know since the OP high tailed out of here. According to him, he had used Excel for 20 years, it sure didn't seem like it.
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Old 07-11-2019, 07:34 AM
 
5,211 posts, read 2,342,563 times
Reputation: 14896
Quote:
Originally Posted by gguerra View Post
We'll never know since the OP high tailed out of here. According to him, he had used Excel for 20 years, it sure didn't seem like it.
Isn't "how to enter a formula for a calculation" about the second or third thing you learn to do in Excel?
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:27 PM
 
28,243 posts, read 39,914,600 times
Reputation: 36758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Curly Q. Bobalink View Post
You're probably correct, there goes two minutes of my life, sigh. I went back and re-read the answers others gave him and saw that he's not really looking for the formula required to do the calculation, he's trying to figure out how to express it in Excel, which is really a different question than the one I answered with the link anyway. I'm no Excel expert, but I've seen this done by others - I think it's a pretty standard macro he's looking to accomplish, probably available in an Excel tutorial on You Tube, I would think. The internet has really spoiled me to the point where I was able to retire without having to do my own cipherin' anymore, LOL. During my career, I had little practical use for calculus, quite a bit for algebra, and knowing trig was essential.

Kids, Math truly is Necessary, unless you want to spend your working years asking whether your customer wants fries with his order. You can look stuff up on the web, but unless you fully understand all the concepts, it's all Greek.
Ahh, math.

After 8 years I had forgotten all my trig and got a job as a draftsman - Many moons ago. Still on a drafting table moons ago - and I was told on Friday that I needed trig to do the job. I went to a store and bought a book "Plane and Spherical Trigonometry" that had questions and answers. With my wife's help I relearned trig over the weekend. I went to work Monday and told the checker that what I did. Much skepticism from everyone of course. They still sell that book

So he handed me the standard test they gave. Aced it.

A few years later we got a job forming a soccer stadium in Ridyah. The engineer gave it to me because I was the only one with an HP41, card reader, and printer. He wanted the abilty to print the numbers for the curves. It required Calculus. Uh, nope. So he had one of the interns teach me enough Calculus in an afternoon to do the job. I credit the intern with making it happen. This kid was probably the smartest person I've ever known, yet he had the ability to explain Calculus to someone like me in a manner I could easily grasp. The requirements were narrow so it wasn't like I was suddenly a Calculus wiz kid.

The stadium was a hyperbolic paraboloid. I still remember the engineers face when he saw my face after he told me that. He sort of smiled a little and said, "A horse saddle."
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:29 PM
 
28,243 posts, read 39,914,600 times
Reputation: 36758
Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
I'll say it again. No calculus is needed to derive the formula for the area of a partial circle. You don't even need to derive it at all, as it's readily available by a Google search, which took me less than 2 minutes. It's kind of a lengthy formula which means you have to be careful in typing it in so all your parentheses line up correctly.


Use the diameter of the tank and its length and type in the formula in Excel just like you would any other Excel formula. No macros. No need for Excel tutorials.


Done!


OP apparently did not want to do this. It was not clear to me whether OP actually understood the process of determining the volume of water in a cylindrical tank lying on its side, but at any rate, he clearly wanted to be given a fish rather than being taught how to fish.
I reread the OP and I wonder if it is circular. They never said so as far as I can find. Perhaps that is why the insistence of using a chart.
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Old 07-11-2019, 01:48 PM
 
5,211 posts, read 2,342,563 times
Reputation: 14896
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
I reread the OP and I wonder if it is circular. They never said so as far as I can find. Perhaps that is why the insistence of using a chart.


He did write "Working on a project. putting together a spreadsheet to calculate fluid quantities in tanks/cylinders". But you're right, it is not totally explicit that the horizontal tank is a true cylinder (think of heating oil tanks that are oval in cross section).


But I think it was the suggestion of using thought to solve the problem that drove him off. Someone who isn't prepared to spend a couple minutes looking up a formula and a couple more minutes typing it into Excel, probably isn't prepared to distinguish between a horizontal tank of circular cross section and a horizontal tank of some other cross section.
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Old Today, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Holly Springs, NC
1,312 posts, read 729,657 times
Reputation: 1908
Quote:
Originally Posted by Des-Lab View Post
Mods: feel free to close or delete this. I came here looking for help. What has me confused might be second nature to others. I thought I explained it as clearly and succinctly as I could.
Assuming you haven't abandoned this thread, please know that what makes sense to you (because you're looking at the data) may not make sense to someone else and vice versa. I use Excel all day, every day and I'm having difficulty visualizing exactly what you want done.

You say type one value in one cell and return a corresponding value in another cell - what is the "other cell"? How is your spreadsheet configured? Without seeing what you want in Excel format, we can't help.

You said you want to:
- Create a table
- Populate cell "a" with a value
- Have cell "b" return a value based on the value entered in cell "a".

this sounds like a classic VLOOKUP. I think why people are struggling is trying to understand what you believe makes it so difficult. It sounds like there may be some information missing from your explanation that may just be an afterthought for you.

If you screenshot what you want your final result to look like that would be helpful.
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