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Old 11-22-2019, 12:55 PM
 
40,407 posts, read 41,910,448 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matadora View Post
Writing a code does not mean you are an expert in AI research such as the one's I quoted above.
No it does not but it does give me better understanding and insight than most. The things you have quoted do not counter anything I have said.

Quote:
AI has been around for 60 years and it's is hardly in it's infancy stage. That's a misconception.
I once installed a bot on a forum using A.L.I.C.E.

https://www.pandorabots.com/pandora/...d616e35e36e881


It uses quite an extensive database of terms and phrases to identify patterns of speech. You'll get some decent responses most of the time, some can be quite humorous. On the backend you were able to add your own patterns, I was using it for a band's site and you could ask it when the next play date was. This was late 90's everybody thought I was goddamn genius.


The basis for this is actually quite old, I believe it goes back to the early 90's. It may appear to be somewhat intelligent but it's not really AI in any sense of the term at least how I would apply it. It's just dumb code limited to the structured data it has.


When I refer to AI I'm talking about things like Watson which is actually quite similar to A.L.I.C.E. on the front end. It's a whole different ball game on the back end because it's doing things that require it make decisions on it's own. Watson was breakthrough moment in AI technology and that is one place you may consider the moment real AI has it's beginnings.
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Old 11-22-2019, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matadora View Post
The simple truth is no machine has any intelligence -- its just a machine running as it was designed to.
True, for now. Eventually we will have self-learning machines that process new knowledge and experience, using that to continually improve themselves. At some point it will be hard to tell the difference between an AI and a human, and given long enough it will be impossible. However you define intelligence, a computer will be able to replicate it eventually.
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Old 11-22-2019, 02:17 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 °N, 🌄°W
11,216 posts, read 5,070,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Transmition View Post
True, for now. Eventually we will have self-learning machines that process new knowledge and experience, using that to continually improve themselves. At some point it will be hard to tell the difference between an AI and a human, and given long enough it will be impossible. However you define intelligence, a computer will be able to replicate it eventually.
A wise Prof. Stuart Russell of UC Berkeley stated:

“The other form of the singularity is the idea of machines redesigning themselves to be better and having that become a cycle. It’s a possibility, and I think that if you’re serious about creating human level AI, you’d better figure out how to make sure that doesn’t happen. If you can’t ensure that a machine doesn’t redesign itself in some physical form, you don’t have any control over it at all.

That’s a basic thing but I don’t think that’s the real issue. If we make machines that are more capable than we are that can have an impact at a global scale, that’s a more present risk.

It’s not about the ability to redesign itself, it’s about the ability to change the world. If a more capable AI is on the internet it has access to 5 billion screens, if it regulates electricity or the financial system, it can have an impact on a global scale and that impact won’t depend on whether it can redesign itself.”

He has links to a lot of good lectures on this topic linked on his personal homepage found on the UC Berkeley website.

Stuart Russell

Stuart J. Russell
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Old 11-22-2019, 02:41 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 °N, 🌄°W
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Transmition View Post
However you define intelligence, a computer will be able to replicate it eventually.
People who view animal brains as a computer have no understanding of the complexity of biology.
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Old 11-22-2019, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 °N, 🌄°W
11,216 posts, read 5,070,533 times
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AI fear-mongering is just wrong and is what many people promote.

This AI research professor has a great website about AI and the issues with people fear-mongering it.

From her website under AI and Society she writes:
I wrote this page because many people worry about the wrong things when they worry about AI.

It's not that there's nothing to worry about AI. It's that many people are confused about the word "intelligent" – they think it means "like a human." Humans are intelligent, but we're also tall, and we (mostly) walk on two legs. We don't think ostriches or giraffes are human, and we shouldn't think robots are human either. I hope that by writing this page, I can help us worry about the right things.
AI Ethics: Artificial Intelligence, Robots, and Society

Joanna J Bryson studied Behavioural Science at the University of Chicago, graduating with an AB in 1986.

In 1991 she moved to the University of Edinburgh where she completed an MSc in Artificial Intelligence before an MPhil in Psychology.

Bryson moved to MIT to complete her PhD, earning a doctorate in 2001 for her thesis " Intelligence by Design: Principles of Modularity and Coordination for Engineering Complex Adaptive Agents".

She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in Primate Cognitive Neuroscience at the Harvard University in 2002.

Her personal website is a great resource.

Joanna J. Bryson
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Old 11-22-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: southern california
56,777 posts, read 75,790,608 times
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Then robots will behave like people when threatening with termination they will lie cheat and fraud
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:11 PM
 
717 posts, read 1,040,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Matadora View Post
People who view animal brains as a computer have no understanding of the complexity of biology.
People who don't view animal brains as a computer have no understanding of biology.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 °N, 🌄°W
11,216 posts, read 5,070,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Transmition View Post
People who don't view animal brains as a computer have no understanding of biology.
It's clear you are a person who views animal brains as a computer, this demonstrates that you have no understanding of the complexity of biology, nor the difference between AI and animal intelligence.

Why Brains Are Not Computers, Why Behaviorism Is Not Satanism, and Why Dolphins Are Not Aquatic Apes

You are clearly stuck on the fallacy of anthropomorphizing inanimate objects.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:37 PM
 
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The complexity doesn't change the fact that anything can be modeled with a sufficiently powerful computer. You seem really hung up on current machines and refuse to acknowledge future improvements. Biology is just a lot of machines - it might be complicated in some cases but it's not impossible to simulate.
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Old 11-22-2019, 03:45 PM
 
Location: Pacific 🌉 °N, 🌄°W
11,216 posts, read 5,070,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Transmition View Post
The complexity doesn't change the fact that anything can be modeled with a sufficiently powerful computer. You seem really hung up on current machines and refuse to acknowledge future improvements. Biology is just a lot of machines - it might be complicated in some cases but it's not impossible to simulate.
LOL again you demonstrate no understanding of the complexities of biology.

One of the most basic objections to the identification of organisms and machines is that their behavior cannot be reduced to the activities and relations of their parts.

In contrast to a mechanical watch, whose activity is fully determined “from the bottom up” by the activities and organisation of its parts, organisms influence the activities of their parts.
For example, your muscles start to grow if you start to exercise. Moreover, the parts of a watch exist before the watch does. It is not the watch itself that builds its own parts.

Once you earn a BS in Biology you will understand the complexities of biology and why biological systems are not computers.

Are organisms basically living machines? The answer is NO!
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