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Old 04-20-2023, 07:11 PM
 
12,517 posts, read 8,736,601 times
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I think a 2x4 will be strong enough. I'd be more concerned about that much weight outboard of ths centerline rolling that side of the *** downward. Depends on the size of the ***. Ok for some reason it didn't like y.a.k
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Old 06-25-2023, 11:56 AM
 
Location: The South
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I have had three quarters of physics many many years ago and I have forgotten all of it, but I will bet a small amount of money your motor ain’t gonna break a 2 x 4. As for the attachment of the 2 x 4 to the boat, it depends.
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Old 06-30-2023, 01:33 PM
 
Location: SCW, AZ
8,180 posts, read 13,255,388 times
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I am baffled that the "Horsepower" is still used as a measurement.
I mean, if this was 1923, I could understand but come on!

Also, what kind of horse are we talking about?
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Old 06-30-2023, 03:25 PM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
4,116 posts, read 2,328,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
I am baffled that the "Horsepower" is still used as a measurement.
I mean, if this was 1923, I could understand but come on!

Also, what kind of horse are we talking about?
Are you serious?

It's the kind that equates to 746 watts. Or 33,000 ft-lbs/min. Or 550 ft-lbs/sec.
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Old 07-02-2023, 01:27 PM
 
Location: SCW, AZ
8,180 posts, read 13,255,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rabbit33 View Post
Are you serious?

It's the kind that equates to 746 watts. Or 33,000 ft-lbs/min. Or 550 ft-lbs/sec.
I mean, it is not even a round, easy to remember number to begin with!


Maybe a donkey or a mule equates to a better or more of a round number, have they looked into that?



























OK, fine, I was joking! ....kinda.

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Old 07-02-2023, 05:11 PM
 
23,487 posts, read 69,725,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
I am baffled that the "Horsepower" is still used as a measurement.
I mean, if this was 1923, I could understand but come on!

Also, what kind of horse are we talking about?
Now now, don't get the family joules in an uproar!

Standard workhorse, at the introduction of steam power, this explains it:

https://www.thoughtco.com/where-did-...e-from-4153171

A horsepower is 1/10th of ten horsepower.
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Old 07-04-2023, 04:32 PM
 
Location: SCW, AZ
8,180 posts, read 13,255,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
A horsepower is 1/10th of ten horsepower.
So, you are saying 1 tenth or 10 horses is 1 horse?

There is just too much math wizardry going on here for me to catch up...


So, again, we are stuck with a term that was coined like 250 years ago but I suppose there really isn't anything more relatable.

If I ever encounter an intelligent lifeform from outerspace, I cannot wait to ask them how many HP their spacecraft has!
I know, they will likely to zap me with their laser gun afterwards but it'd be so worth it to see their face.
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Old 07-05-2023, 12:02 PM
 
23,487 posts, read 69,725,913 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TurcoLoco View Post
So, you are saying 1 tenth or 10 horses is 1 horse?

There is just too much math wizardry going on here for me to catch up...


So, again, we are stuck with a term that was coined like 250 years ago but I suppose there really isn't anything more relatable.

If I ever encounter an intelligent lifeform from outerspace, I cannot wait to ask them how many HP their spacecraft has!
I know, they will likely to zap me with their laser gun afterwards but it'd be so worth it to see their face.
It gets worse - much worse.

The Sumerians arguably had the most advanced understanding of how to set up math so that it worked in most situations. It goes downhill from there. Cubits and such were based upon average human dimensions, and the Romans used seeds and such. The English had the 20 ounce pint, where we have a 16 ounce one. Where's my beer? Shinkflation! Napoleon and his crew tried to turn everything into Base ten, I guess because they could only count on fingers (although Stalingrad must have presented problems with frostbite). That institutionalized a system worse than the Sumerian, in that fractions had to be used instead of having divisions by 2,3,4,6, etc. come out nicely. Did you know they also wanted a 10 hour clock? People refused, thank goodness.

Then those horses got the bits in their mouths, but because Watt got mentally stuck on Base ten, there were ten of them instead of a team of eight (much more common at the time). Had there been 8 horses with a bit in each of their mouths, that would have been a byte. We could, instead of having a standard horsepower, have a bit of horsepower, and then if we had a team could proclaim "Byte me!"

However, in computers, Base 2 was a faulty ivory tower. It was based on an "on-off" state. In basic electronics that is a simple on-off relay. However, had we been using the Sumerian math it is more likely the early computer geniuses would have gone with the THREE states possible - positive, zero or neutral, and negative (reversed polarity). That is a relay where if you apply a positive voltage it goes in one direction to make a connection, but if you reverse the voltage it goes in the opposite direction.

Instead, there is a megabyte, that is a unit that equals either 1,048,576 (220) bytes or 1,000,000 (106) bytes, depending on the device's manufacturer. And a billion? Read it and weep - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billion

A horsepower might seem quaint, but at least it doesn't make your head spin.
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Old 07-07-2023, 02:11 PM
 
Location: SCW, AZ
8,180 posts, read 13,255,388 times
Reputation: 7821
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
It gets worse - much worse.

The Sumerians arguably had the most advanced understanding of how to set up math so that it worked in most situations. It goes downhill from there. Cubits and such were based upon average human dimensions, and the Romans used seeds and such. The English had the 20 ounce pint, where we have a 16 ounce one. Where's my beer? Shinkflation! Napoleon and his crew tried to turn everything into Base ten, I guess because they could only count on fingers (although Stalingrad must have presented problems with frostbite). That institutionalized a system worse than the Sumerian, in that fractions had to be used instead of having divisions by 2,3,4,6, etc. come out nicely. Did you know they also wanted a 10 hour clock? People refused, thank goodness.

Then those horses got the bits in their mouths, but because Watt got mentally stuck on Base ten, there were ten of them instead of a team of eight (much more common at the time). Had there been 8 horses with a bit in each of their mouths, that would have been a byte. We could, instead of having a standard horsepower, have a bit of horsepower, and then if we had a team could proclaim "Byte me!"

However, in computers, Base 2 was a faulty ivory tower. It was based on an "on-off" state. In basic electronics that is a simple on-off relay. However, had we been using the Sumerian math it is more likely the early computer geniuses would have gone with the THREE states possible - positive, zero or neutral, and negative (reversed polarity). That is a relay where if you apply a positive voltage it goes in one direction to make a connection, but if you reverse the voltage it goes in the opposite direction.

Instead, there is a megabyte, that is a unit that equals either 1,048,576 (220) bytes or 1,000,000 (106) bytes, depending on the device's manufacturer. And a billion? Read it and weep - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billion

A horsepower might seem quaint, but at least it doesn't make your head spin.
I didn't know that (I really do not know a LOT of things)!
Now that you mentioned it, it got me thinking (not something I do often or well, btw), why not 10 hours, or even better 20 hours in a day? Whatever point of reference we were using, can be changed thus changing everything else along with it. For example, the concept of a "second" can be equaled to a time duration that is longer than the duration of a standard second. So, even if people were still using 60 seconds in a minute rule, then naturally a minute would be a longer time duration as an hour would be.
So, we could, technically, end up having 20 hours in a day! Then either the hourly rate for work would have to be adjusted or the typical 8-hour shift would have to be adjusted down to something like 6.5 hours.

Hmmm ....never mind!
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Old 07-07-2023, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Sunnybrook Farm
4,116 posts, read 2,328,374 times
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I don't KNOW how the division of time into 24 hours came about, but there are two points to consider.

1) 24 hours, 60 minutes, 60 seconds are quantities that divide most easily into the largest number of subdivisions without remainders. This was relevant when there were no calculators.

2) I have read that before the development of commonly available clocks, few people told time by hours and minutes as we do now. Well, hobbing the gears of a clock is a whole lot easier if you're working with gear ratios that are easily divisible without remainders. It's simply not possible to make a gear with other than whole numbers of teeth.
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