U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 09-10-2007, 09:54 AM
 
124 posts, read 321,984 times
Reputation: 47

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Colts View Post
Honestly, I don't really care because I'm not a scientist or anything but I have to admit, it's easier to judge air temperature and body weight in English units
I'm sure that whatever system we grew up using will be the one we will feel more comfortable with, be it metric or English units.

The whole point that I was trying to make in starting this thread was that we aren't doing ourselves or our future generations any favors by using two systems. I don't see how anyone can argue that. The metric system isn't going away, and we are one of 3 developed countries that still uses English units (even though the metric system has been the "official system of measurement" since December 23, 1975):

Metric Conversion Act of 1975
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-10-2007, 11:07 AM
 
Location: Mableton, GA USA (NW Atlanta suburb, 4 miles OTP)
11,320 posts, read 20,687,626 times
Reputation: 3801
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtb83201 View Post
I'm sure that whatever system we grew up using will be the one we will feel more comfortable with, be it metric or English units.

The whole point that I was trying to make in starting this thread was that we aren't doing ourselves or our future generations any favors by using two systems. I don't see how anyone can argue that. The metric system isn't going away, and we are one of 3 developed countries that still uses English units (even though the metric system has been the "official system of measurement" since December 23, 1975):
What are the three countries? The US, the UK, and who?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2007, 03:44 PM
 
124 posts, read 321,984 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcsteiner View Post
What are the three countries? The US, the UK, and who?
Though all countries have made some effort to metricate, the US, Liberia, and Burma are the farthest behind. This map should help: Image:SI-metrication-world.png - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

this link is also useful: Metric usage and metrication in other countries

Last edited by mtb83201; 09-10-2007 at 03:55 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2007, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
20,918 posts, read 24,588,753 times
Reputation: 5939
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
Did you hear that NASA is going metric?

Of course you can stay with the monetary system you like and I'll stay with the one I like. Same for calendars too.

I'd hate to tell you that the United States Metric Association headquarters is in your town, Northridge.
As I said, you stay with the system you like and I'll stay with the one I like.

I wonder... what if a time measuring system was invented which proved to be "better" than the current time system.
And let's say that in this new system, a second is replaced by a "lunka." One lunka equals 1.855 seconds.

Would you honestly want to change to that?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2007, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Northridge/Porter Ranch, Calif.
20,918 posts, read 24,588,753 times
Reputation: 5939
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtb83201 View Post
I'm sure that whatever system we grew up using will be the one we will feel more comfortable with, be it metric or English units.

The whole point that I was trying to make in starting this thread was that we aren't doing ourselves or our future generations any favors by using two systems. I don't see how anyone can argue that. The metric system isn't going away, and we are one of 3 developed countries that still uses English units (even though the metric system has been the "official system of measurement" since December 23, 1975):

Metric Conversion Act of 1975
I hope the metric system does go away!

The reason why the metric system hasn't caught on in the U.S. is because more Americans don't want it than do want it. There is no reason to force a system of weights and measurements on a nation which doesn't want it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2007, 06:02 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
3,994 posts, read 7,921,141 times
Reputation: 1678
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtb83201 View Post
I'm sure that whatever system we grew up using will be the one we will feel more comfortable with, be it metric or English units.
Anything for that matter can apply to that statement. A British person over the age of 40 might be more comfortable with prices in Pounds, Shillings, and Pence than decimalized Pounds and (New) Pence or in Dollars and Cents.

As far as George Washington's mother was concerned, he was born on February 11, 1731. Britain and her colonies, including what is now the United States, Canada, Australia, etc. switched from the Julian (O.S) to the Gregorian Calendar (N.S.) on September 14, 1752 (N.S.). If we didn't switch in 1752, there would be a 13 day loss to convert instead of the 11 in the 18th Century and New Years' Day is on March 25 (Lady Day or Annunciation Day) not on January 1.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2007, 01:38 PM
 
124 posts, read 321,984 times
Reputation: 47
Default metric time

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fleet View Post
As I said, you stay with the system you like and I'll stay with the one I like.

I wonder... what if a time measuring system was invented which proved to be "better" than the current time system.
And let's say that in this new system, a second is replaced by a "lunka." One lunka equals 1.855 seconds.

Would you honestly want to change to that?
The French actually tried to make time metric in 1795. If "metric time" had succeeded, we would have 100 metric minutes in a metric hour. There would be ten metric hours in a metric day. Ten days a week, and so on. Pretty weird to think about.

I don't really like that idea, even though logically it may be less confusing than the system we currently use (ABT). At least we Americans don't insist on keeping time differently from the rest of the world. That would really drive everyone nuts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-11-2007, 10:44 PM
 
Location: Greater Houston
3,994 posts, read 7,921,141 times
Reputation: 1678
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtb83201 View Post
The French actually tried to make time metric in 1795. If "metric time" had succeeded, we would have 100 metric minutes in a metric hour. There would be ten metric hours in a metric day. Ten days a week, and so on. Pretty weird to think about.

I don't really like that idea, even though logically it may be less confusing than the system we currently use (ABT). At least we Americans don't insist on keeping time differently from the rest of the world. That would really drive everyone nuts.
Actually time is completely separate from the metric system. The preferred unit of time (in SI) is the second although the minute and the hour are accepted. In fact, Speed Limit signs are in kilometers-an-hour (km/h). Besides time, angles and dates (the calendar) are not covered by the metric system.

The Jeffersonian decimal measuring system was developed by Thomas Jefferson but it had kinks to be worked out just like the "metric time" proposal. Some day, someone will work out the kinks in our sexagesimal timekeeping system. Astronomers need an easier way to calculate date and time. I think the research and development has been delayed because the rest of the world is waiting for us to use metric for so long.

Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution gives Congress the power to "fix the standard of weights and measures" so the Jeffersonian system would replace the Colonial measures once Jefferson's report was completed. Congress didn't approve his system because they may have known about the innovations in France commissioned by King Louis XVI. (He was a better engineer than a politician for sure.) But other things came up and they were busy trying to keep a fledgling country together.

Last edited by KerrTown; 09-11-2007 at 11:00 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2007, 01:52 AM
 
Location: Chicago
38,691 posts, read 82,193,210 times
Reputation: 29146
Metric is for Eurosissies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2007, 09:24 AM
 
124 posts, read 321,984 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
Actually time is completely separate from the metric system.
I'm quite aware of that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Science and Technology
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top