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Old 08-22-2009, 04:15 PM
 
294 posts, read 566,393 times
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Tesla Motors Releases Teaser Shots of Model S Sedan | Popular Science

You can't buy one until 2011, but Tesla Motors' Model S sedan looks so good on the road, we might just tack one of these shots to our bedroom wall
By Mike Spinelli Posted 08.21.2009 at 2:49 pm 5 Comments

Tesla Model S, Side View: Top speed of the Tesla Model S, formerly code-named White Star, will be limited to 120 mph. Three battery pack options will offer a range of 160, 230 or 300 miles on a charge, which can be handled in 3 to 5 hours by 120V or 240V outlets, or in 45 minutes by way of a 480V supply. Of course, Tesla points out, you could just swap out the battery in 5 minutes. Tesla Motors
View Photo Gallery

Tesla's new teaser photos may be the first ones showing the new Model S sedan in mid-flog, but don't expect to catch one along the coast highway just yet. Tesla says the first deliveries of the $57,400 all-electric sedan (with a $7,500 government rebate check in hand, the price will drop just below 50 large) will commence in 2011. The company says they've already taken more than 1,000 pre-orders, along with deposits of $5,000 a pop. Here's to you, early adopters.


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Old 08-22-2009, 05:25 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,718,279 times
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There is something I don't get with electric cars. What do you do when the batteries are empty? With a gasoline powered car, you stop for 2 minutes at a gas station and then continue your ride. What people do with electric cars? How long it takes to recharge it?
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Old 08-23-2009, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Sango, TN
24,889 posts, read 20,317,258 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
There is something I don't get with electric cars. What do you do when the batteries are empty? With a gasoline powered car, you stop for 2 minutes at a gas station and then continue your ride. What people do with electric cars? How long it takes to recharge it?
The more they are adopted, the more likely that there will be "recharge stations" here and there.

Think of it, parking garages with plug ins rented by the hour, rest areas with plug ins that can be rented, and service stations doing the same.

When taking a trip of longer than 300 miles, its highly recommended that you take a significant break along the way. So its a 500 mile trip, and you stop at 250 to recharge the battery. I'm sure that a computer on the car can tell you how many miles you have left to drive at your current rate of consumption.

Generally, most of these folks will be using the car close to home, most Americans don't drive 300 miles a day. When you get home, you plug your car in for the night.
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Old 08-23-2009, 04:02 PM
 
Location: Bellingham, WA
9,745 posts, read 13,659,852 times
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480V!! It looks like a winner in the $50,000 luxury sedan market, and maybe eventually Tesla could create an economy car with that sort of range. I wouldn't mind owning an electric, small, 3 door hatchback. I might miss shifting gears, but I could get over that.
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:13 PM
 
5,532 posts, read 5,718,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
The more they are adopted, the more likely that there will be "recharge stations" here and there.

Think of it, parking garages with plug ins rented by the hour, rest areas with plug ins that can be rented, and service stations doing the same.

When taking a trip of longer than 300 miles, its highly recommended that you take a significant break along the way. So its a 500 mile trip, and you stop at 250 to recharge the battery. I'm sure that a computer on the car can tell you how many miles you have left to drive at your current rate of consumption.

Generally, most of these folks will be using the car close to home, most Americans don't drive 300 miles a day. When you get home, you plug your car in for the night.
Yes, but under current conditions, how can electric cars substitute gasoline driven cars? In all discussions, they portray the electric car as a viable alternative to today's transportation (except for price which is likely to come down with mass production). But even if you have charging stations along the way, will you be ready to wait 5 hours for your car to charge?
I remember years ago, when I first heard about electric cars, there was a suggestion to exchange batteries at a gas station. Batteries will be packed in standard modules (like a drawer) and gas stations will provide freshly charged batteries. But such solution is not even discussed today.
A Danish scientist, suggested an elevated monorail on existing highways. Vehicles will travel like train cars (3" intervals) at 150 mph and at the same time recharge their batteries. Exits will be provided at pre-planned intervals. This makes more sense then waiting 5 hours for a charge.
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Old 08-24-2009, 07:59 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
5,122 posts, read 5,969,427 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Memphis1979 View Post
The more they are adopted, the more likely that there will be "recharge stations" here and there.

Think of it, parking garages with plug ins rented by the hour, rest areas with plug ins that can be rented, and service stations doing the same.

When taking a trip of longer than 300 miles, its highly recommended that you take a significant break along the way. So its a 500 mile trip, and you stop at 250 to recharge the battery. I'm sure that a computer on the car can tell you how many miles you have left to drive at your current rate of consumption.

Generally, most of these folks will be using the car close to home, most Americans don't drive 300 miles a day. When you get home, you plug your car in for the night.

Well, as the OP states, it takes about five minutes to swap out a battery. I suppose there could be battery swapping stations as well. Takes about the same amount of time as filling the tank. A batterry is a battery. The discharged batteries can be charged at the "station" and swapped into the next vehicle that comes in. This would also insure that batteries beyond their useful life get recycled properly as well.

Getting the batteries to a standardized type, and size so all brands of electric vehicles could use them would be the best way to go.

What a great looking vehicle though. Totally mainstream appearance. Not toy like, oddball shaped stuff like a prius, or some of the other attrocities some of the manufacturers have put out there. This is the kind of car that will allow electric vehicles gain acceptance......

Now let's see an electric crew cab 4X4 dually, that can haul a 15,000 lb boat/trailer combo down the hiway at 55mph. Until then, it'll be Diesel for me.
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:52 PM
 
26,911 posts, read 38,161,464 times
Reputation: 34854
Quote:
Originally Posted by oberon_1 View Post
Yes, but under current conditions, how can electric cars substitute gasoline driven cars? In all discussions, they portray the electric car as a viable alternative to today's transportation (except for price which is likely to come down with mass production). But even if you have charging stations along the way, will you be ready to wait 5 hours for your car to charge?
I remember years ago, when I first heard about electric cars, there was a suggestion to exchange batteries at a gas station. Batteries will be packed in standard modules (like a drawer) and gas stations will provide freshly charged batteries. But such solution is not even discussed today.
A Danish scientist, suggested an elevated monorail on existing highways. Vehicles will travel like train cars (3" intervals) at 150 mph and at the same time recharge their batteries. Exits will be provided at pre-planned intervals. This makes more sense then waiting 5 hours for a charge.
You're missing the point.

Developers are not claiming that their electric cars (for the foreseeable future) are going to replace all gasoline powered vehicles. They are designed to be used for commuting, not cross-country travel. You need to keep in mind that the majority of Americans drive less than 40 miles a day except when they travel. So you have an electric commuter and a gasoline traveler.

That top end Tesla could get me to my favorite casino and back with some driving around at the casino end and still have about one hundred miles travel left. That casino is 130 miles away.

The Volt may be the variation that brings about cross-country travel in an electric, but it will be done using gas! The difference is the gasoline engine (tiny) will keep the batteries charged and the batteries will power the electric motors that drive the car. I'm waiting to see just how efficient that system will really be...
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Old 08-25-2009, 12:54 PM
 
26,911 posts, read 38,161,464 times
Reputation: 34854
Quote:
Originally Posted by yachtcare View Post
Well, as the OP states, it takes about five minutes to swap out a battery. I suppose there could be battery swapping stations as well. Takes about the same amount of time as filling the tank. A batterry is a battery. The discharged batteries can be charged at the "station" and swapped into the next vehicle that comes in. This would also insure that batteries beyond their useful life get recycled properly as well.

Getting the batteries to a standardized type, and size so all brands of electric vehicles could use them would be the best way to go.

What a great looking vehicle though. Totally mainstream appearance. Not toy like, oddball shaped stuff like a prius, or some of the other attrocities some of the manufacturers have put out there. This is the kind of car that will allow electric vehicles gain acceptance......

Now let's see an electric crew cab 4X4 dually, that can haul a 15,000 lb boat/trailer combo down the hiway at 55mph. Until then, it'll be Diesel for me.
Does it have to travel more than 10 blocks before a charge?
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Old 08-25-2009, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Missouri
3,722 posts, read 2,974,785 times
Reputation: 1606
The thought certainly has come to the Tesla engineers, but why not build a vehicle with two battery packs. While one is used up, the other one is charged by the spinning wheels or transmission shaft. If it takes 5 hours to charge, well a 300 mile trip is about 5 hours. What are the technical obstacles?

It's a very good looking car.
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Old 08-27-2009, 11:13 AM
 
5,092 posts, read 9,605,812 times
Reputation: 3941
Quote:
Originally Posted by geofra View Post
The thought certainly has come to the Tesla engineers, but why not build a vehicle with two battery packs. While one is used up, the other one is charged by the spinning wheels or transmission shaft. If it takes 5 hours to charge, well a 300 mile trip is about 5 hours. What are the technical obstacles?

It's a very good looking car.
Ummm, that would be a mechanical load on the other battery actually driving the car, running it down faster. Net would be less than zero.

The real "fix" is to grid power the roadway and let the electric cars pick their power up from the roadway. This is totally safe and costs less than 1/2 of the price of gasoline and all power would be from in US -- meaning no more imported oil (see why we are NOT doing this?). South Korea (Not US) is already working on the prototypes.
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