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Old 07-27-2010, 05:25 PM
 
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NUB, in the year that I graduated (2000), there were 3 school districts in WA that had around 50% senior graduating rate: Highline SD (which I personally attended, but not graduated from), Everett SD, and Seattle Public Schools. This doesn't include seniors who then made up and finished summer school to graduate (late). From the (Highline SD) HS that I went to, 3% will go directly to a 4 year college/university. Conversely, Bellevue SD consistently has schools that are in the top 100 of America for a long time. Newport HS, for example, has 97% of students going directly to a 4 year college/university.

In the papers not too long ago, they were talking about that and talking about how far Everett come to improve that. Everett SD has an office/department set aside with staff with the intent of dealing with those who are high risk drop-outs. No mention of Seattle Public Schools doing that.

Seattle Public Schools also get mired down with a lot of problems which has been long existing, bad decisions and problems due to the parents being too... "sue-happy" or politically correct. This is what is on the Seattleite's mind... Seattle Public schools has very PUBLIC problems. Ideally, you'd want to be in the area where you're guaranteed that your child be going to the best schools of Seattle Public Schools. But they also do a lottery that limits space-- not to mention its heavily favored for the minority (there is a history of bussing).

I attended schools in the Highline SD... then transferred to Bellevue SD. All I can say is that Bellevue SD is just... amazing. Perhaps you don't realize that quality does make a huge difference and that what was I experience in Bellevue SD. QUALITY. In general, for your kids: you want quality education which is what Bellevue SD does: provides for every kids. This isn't to say say I didn't have great teachers in Highline SD, but the odds are stacked against them and they worked hard trying to reach each of us. This isn't to say that all will have a great experience with Bellevue SD.

Good quality schools are good quality schools, regardless of where its set.
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:31 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 5,084,354 times
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To Ira and Inkpoe: But knallday's family seems to want to find a good school IN Seattle for their kids for a more bigger city lifestyle.

Are you saying no good/awesome elementary, middle, or high schools exist in Seattle city limits!?
I just find that hard to believe and feel like that cant be true.

I know someone in Seattle that grew up in Capital Hill, went to high school somewhere there, and liked it a lot.

Well, Seattle has the University of Washington, which is one of the best colleges in the USA. And North Seattle CC and Seattle Central CC seem like great community colleges.

If Seattle is one of the "most educated" city of any size in America based on people with college degrees(Sometimes even ranked 1st-3rd), it must have some nice elementary, middle schools, and high schools in it.

Im sure there are nice schools in the suburbs below college, but this must be true with Seattle. I guess youre both saying its much more riskier for someone to be able to attend a good elementary, middle, or high school in Seattle than in a suburb. With the strict zoning laws, lottery thing, and other things, it somehow seems more complicated in Seattle.

NYC has the complete opposite of strict zoning laws with High schools. Someone can go as far as away as 2 hours one way( 4 hours both ways commute!) if they want to for high school in NYC. If someone doesnt get in ANY school, they usually then go to the high school closest to them.
Sooooooooooooooo different.

In my first high school, I had one hour and a half commute one way for one example.

Going to a high school closeby to where someone lives vs. further away can have its advantages and its disadvantages.

But then again there are people that go to school here with long commutes too. Just doesnt seem like that though for Seattle high schools students within the city.

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 07-27-2010 at 05:45 PM..
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:37 PM
 
5,565 posts, read 6,428,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaturalUrbanBalence View Post
To Ira and Inkpoe: But knallday's family seems to want to find a good school IN Seattle for their kids for a more bigger city lifestyle.

Are you saying no good/awesome elementary, middle, or high schools exist in Seattle city limits!?
I just find that hard to believe and feel like that cant be true.
Quote:
Originally Posted by knallday1 View Post
Hello, we are a young family moving to seattle area, but sure what area is best to live in....We are looking for great school district! My husband was offered a job in Kent, Wa but we don't want to move away from the city, we want city live and awesome schools. Can someone help us decide!!!
It would be helpful is some knows about schools with ESE programs!!
Thanks,
That's not what she's asking. She's asking for SCHOOL DISTRICTS. Had she asked what great schools are within Seattle Public Schools, we would've gladly answered that for her.
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:40 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 5,084,354 times
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To Inkpoe: I edited my post a lot right before you posted that post, so can you reread it?
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Old 07-27-2010, 05:54 PM
 
5,565 posts, read 6,428,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaturalUrbanBalence View Post
...

If Seattle is one of the "most educated" city of any size in America based on people with college degrees(Sometimes even ranked 1st-3rd), it must have some nice elementary, middle schools, and high schools in it.
You'd also have to factor in: not all residents with college degrees here are natives. They all came in for the great job opportunities with our great companies.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NaturalUrbanBalence View Post

Im sure there are nice schools in the suburbs below college, but this must be true with Seattle. I guess youre both saying its much more riskier for someone to be able to attend a good elementary, middle, or high school in Seattle than in a suburb. With the strict zoning laws, lottery thing, and other things, it somehow seems more complicated in Seattle.

Forget about the urbanity vs. suburbanity-- we're talking about quality of education.

That's just the thing: With Seattle Public, it's complicated.

It goes both ways: Some people enjoyed their experience within Seattle Public, and others don't.

I remember a poster (I think it was 415_sk?) recently talking about his experience growing up in the Seattle Public School and it was negative. He said his parents were trying to get him into the better schools within the district, but it never worked out for them and that he was one of the few white kids, obviously there some racial tensions as he mentioned at the time the big issue was Rodney King.

I will say this... I think it's insane that you had to go an hour and a half ONE WAY to a school. Did they provide you transportation? Because if my daughter has to do that, I'd be raising all sorts of heck with the school district.
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Old 07-27-2010, 06:22 PM
 
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Yeah. It does sound like Seattle public is more complicated and riskier than just going to a school in most of the suburbs. However, to some (or many) it is worth it. It depends on the personal circumstances.

When was there racial tensions in Seattle? Was that before the 1990s? I heard positive things about Washington state's racial history. The 1990s in Seattle didnt seem to have that much/if any racial tension. In the 1990s, I heard,Seattle had a two term black mayor that was very popular and being elected for two terms. Even NYC had racial tensions in the 1990s related to there being a black mayor, and he was elected for only one term, even though he seemed to be a great mayor. He was replaced by a white republican mayor in a city that is majority minority and mostly democrat. So it almost seems like Seattle had better racial harmony than NYC in the 1990s or something like that, which is interesting.

I chose to go to school that far away because I lived one neighborhood north of the South Bronx and didnt want to go to high school in the Bronx, or anywhere above the Upper East Side/Upper West Side in Manhattan. I didnt get admitted into Bronx Science, which pretty much was the only high school I would consider going to in the Bronx.

So I went to school to the Lower East Side in Manhattan. I took a subway and a bus, or two different subways and then a ten block walk to get there. There were other people that had commutes as long as mine one way or even longer! Like I said, some as long as 2 hours one way! Most of these people just didnt want to go to high school in those outer boroughs they lived in(Like me), because the local high schools where they lived were mostly not good.

Ironically, there were plenty of people that were high school students in that city and had short commutes too. My sister for one example, got into Bronx Science which was only 5 blocks from where we lived, so she had like a 10 minute commute by walking, lol. If I got into Bronx Science, I would have gone there.

Overall, I feel like the long commute was worth it for me because I DID NOT want to go to high school in the Bronx, except if it was for Bronx Science. But it was very stressful a lot of the time, and when I was doing that, it didnt feel worth it. But in retrospect, it did feel worth it, and Im glad I didnt have go to high school in the Bronx. Bronx is by far my least favorite borough in NYC.

Like I said, going to a high school closer or further away has its advantages and its disadvantages.

Actually, a friend/ex of mine that lives in Everett has at least an hour commute one way to the high school she goes to in Kirkland. Her mom drives her to Kirkland and she has to wake up at 4 AM because her mom has to go work at 6 am, and she doesnt seem to have other public tansportation options. And she usually sleeps at like 10-11pm(She really should sleep earlier). I dont know how she can live like that. I didnt believe her at first but she was serious! She says its worth it going to high school in Kirkland over Everett but I dont know. She is miserable because of it and cant wait until she graduates. I woke up at 7 am and school started at 9 am, so I didnt have it as stressful as she did.

Some people that had long commutes to high school did well in school, but others struggled, and some even transferred to high schools closer to them and started to do much better in school.

Interesting how she is able to go to a high school far away from Everett in the Seattle metro suburbs, but a high school student in Seattle has to go closeby(in the same neighborhood they live in) for high school lol.

Last edited by Thepastpresentandfuture; 07-27-2010 at 06:44 PM..
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Old 07-27-2010, 06:45 PM
 
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Seattle had a mandatory school busing program that ended not that long ago. It wasn't popular with either white parents or black parents ( or the kids). It made for very long bus rides, but not for the purpose of enhancing education necessarily. Seattle is only about 10% African-American, but the school district is 40 something percent African-American.
And, given that the north end schools are very white, it signifies that there's a lot of segregation in the schools. Not completely. There's economic disparity as much as racial. The south end schools have far lower test scores, and much higher minority populations. The school board is walking a tightrope. They would like to raise the level of education in those neighborhoods, but they've already alienated middle class parents, and don't want to risk the success they have in the good schools they still have, but since the average income of the family of the median Seattle public school student is far lower than the city as a whole, they can't ignore the folks that can't afford to go to private schools.
So there's a ton of politics involved, and rarely does it benefit the students.
But yes, Seattle does have some great ( I don't know, maybe a dozen good elementary schools, half a dozen good middle schools, 1-2 good high schools?) public schools, and that's mostly because of heavily involved parents willing to fight.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:03 PM
 
Location: Florida
919 posts, read 1,196,744 times
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Knallday1, I too live in Miami and have been here visiting the Seattle area since the beginning of July. If I were to move here with young kids I will consider the east side 1st, primarily Bellevue. Again that's me. It all comes down to what you prioritize and value. Based on your op it seems like Bellevue may be what you are looking for. Plus, downtown Seattle is not far away. Commuting to and from has to be taken into consideration as well as type of lifestyle you are seeking. In my opinion there are pros and cons to living in Seattle and the east side.
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Old 07-27-2010, 08:15 PM
 
Location: North Baltimore ----> Seattle
6,476 posts, read 6,025,684 times
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Here's what I notice about Seattle: Even those in low-paying service sector jobs can read, write and speak like an adult. That is certainly untrue elsewhere. To me, it's a very unscientific measure of the public schools of a place.
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Old 07-27-2010, 10:12 PM
 
5,565 posts, read 6,428,419 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NaturalUrbanBalence View Post
Interesting how she is able to go to a high school far away from Everett in the Seattle metro suburbs, but a high school student in Seattle has to go closeby(in the same neighborhood they live in) for high school lol.
Actually, a lot of the public schools here have an Open Enrollment policy. Basically if there is space in the school, kids that live outside the school district can come in and attend that school (which sounds like what you did). However, the Open Enrollment will NOT provide transportation to the (out of the district) kids and its has limits as to how many kids can come in. Some will use the lottery or have the "first come, first serve" policy to determine who can come in.

Your friend is obviously doing that. Not surprise, Kirkland is part of the Lake Washington SD which is up there with Bellevue SD.




What Ira says is correct: the southern portion of the Seattle Public School is what drags the scores for the district.

For those students who decide they want to attend another SD, what options do they have? Tukwila SD and Highline SD (which abuts Seattle Public boundaries) are equally low performing. Mercer Island could work as it's close enough and very highly regarded, but again the limited space and high competition for those spots. Its not the norm here for a student to be traveling that long a distance to a good school as most parents have to work (bad traffic) and our public transit outside Seattle Metro isn't that (great/reliable/quick-- take your pick).

When I was attending (Highline SD) HS, I noticed a lot of the Black guys were transferring to Rainier Beach HS. One of my classmate said it was because they wanted to be around their own kind. I don't know if this trend was exclusive to my HS. That probably also adds into the 40 something percentage of AA folks.
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