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Old 10-19-2010, 11:09 PM
 
10 posts, read 20,621 times
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Default Social/Political climate in Kirkland/Redmond area?

I'm wondering if any locals can give us the dish on the social and political feel in the Kirkland/Redmond area. We are narrowing our search to these cities because of the great schools and safety for our family. City data reports a stronger Hispanic population in Redmond than almost anywhere else in Seattle. This is important to us as a Hispanic/Caucasian family. We are concerned that although Issaquah/Sammamish are beautiful with good schools, it may be more politically conservative in that particular congressional district. We're looking for a friendly little city to raise our family, with a strong economic base. My husband feels lke Kirkland might be "hipper" (which he likes). But also hoping for something more "down to earth" with less of a "snobby" mentality. What should we expect about the culture of these places?
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Old 10-20-2010, 12:12 AM
 
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The eastside, the 8th congressional district, which represents Issaquah/Sammamish has never elected a Democrat to congress, yet in the last three Presidential elections have favored Democrats ( Gore, kerry, Obama), so they're not THAT conservative. Plus the Republican in office, Dave Reichert, is smooth enough that he gets some support from Democrats because he has a pretty consistently pro environment voting record.
Redmond is a nice place, and even has a little bit of farmland left, but is physically large, and some of it is so far from downtown Redmond that you'll feel that you're on Mars.
Kirkland isn't all hip and trendy. Downtown Kirkland, sure. But other parts are less stuffy. Houghton is a nice part of Kirkland, so is Juanita. Kingsgate is less nice, with a fair number of run down 60's-70's apartment buildings.
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Old 10-22-2010, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Yakima, Wa
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I will be in a similar situation when I move back to Washington (if I can get a damn job). I wonder about the same things because my girlfriend is hispanic and when I was growing up in Washington we looked down on many hispanic immigrants since they were usually poor and uneducated. In Washington the hispanic community didn't used to be very well integrated, like it is in Texas, but I haven't lived there for over ten years so I don't know if it's any different now.

I do know that Bellevue is the most diverse city on the Eastside, but I don't think there's much of a hispanic population there.
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Old 10-22-2010, 03:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlB328 View Post

I do know that Bellevue is the most diverse city on the Eastside, but I don't think there's much of a hispanic population there.
Hmm... I see a lot of them around the Crossroads, Eastgate, Overlake area. There's also a lot in Bellevue DT area, where the jobs are. In comparison to TX though, we don't have as much Hispanic people.

Bellevue SD itself has a Spanish Immersion program K-12, so I guess that's saying something?
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Old 10-22-2010, 03:45 PM
 
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The entire area, no matter which part you go to, tends to lean a little to the left. It's not extreeeeeeeeeeeeme left, though (as it is in Portland). You'll find that just about anywhere in the area you head to is going to be somewhat in the middle. Redmond will largely be no different. It's full of techies. Which means that it's socially liberal but fiscally tends to be a bit more conservative (we're all for equality and don't hold any ethnic biases per se, but we're also successful and don't want to have the government transfer the earnings from all of our hard work to someone who won't work).

Now that being said, I don't know of too many people who choose a place to live based on how their neighbors lean politically. At least not up here. I know in Portland that's all anybody did, but again - those guys are extremists down there.
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Old 10-22-2010, 08:29 PM
 
Location: South Whidbey Island
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
The entire area, no matter which part you go to, tends to lean a little to the left. It's not extreeeeeeeeeeeeme left, though (as it is in Portland). You'll find that just about anywhere in the area you head to is going to be somewhat in the middle. Redmond will largely be no different. It's full of techies. Which means that it's socially liberal but fiscally tends to be a bit more conservative (we're all for equality and don't hold any ethnic biases per se, but we're also successful and don't want to have the government transfer the earnings from all of our hard work to someone who won't work).

Now that being said, I don't know of too many people who choose a place to live based on how their neighbors lean politically. At least not up here. I know in Portland that's all anybody did, but again - those guys are extremists down there.
I'm not the OP, but I find that info refreshing for me too. I'm a moderate, but I probably lean a little left on social issues. I'm a strong fiscal conservative though. I guess I can add that to the list of positives for living up there.
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Old 10-24-2010, 11:49 PM
 
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This is really helpful. It may seem absurd that I posed this question in the first place but this is actually one of the big real estate lessons we learned in 06'. We sold at the height of the market in Los Angeles and bought a great home in Rocklin, CA (20 miles east of Sacramento). On paper, everything looked great, great schools, parks, and it was even voted "one of the best places to live" in U.S. News Report (which is why I question their formula). We hated it and after two years, left everything behind to move back to the S.F. Bay Area. Because it was CA and so close to the capital, we never thought to ask about social/politics. Turns out, it was the most conservative district in the state, openly racist, no jobs and everywhere around us were signs opposing gay marriage. Every prop we ever voted for was shot down. To be surrounded by such overwhelming racism was really shocking to us and we refused to have our daughter raised around that mentality. Now, she has developed friendships with diverse families and we would like to make sure we don't make that mistake again. We don't feel the need for extreme liberal POV, but tolerance is essential.
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Old 10-25-2010, 03:08 AM
 
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I never really understood why Californians were always shocked at what a *#&!hole Sacramento is. Most people only have to visit there for a couple of days to realize what a dump the entire area is. There's a reason why it's affordable by California standards.
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Old 10-25-2010, 11:45 AM
 
Location: South Whidbey Island
1,752 posts, read 1,426,830 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sgomezlcsw View Post
This is really helpful. It may seem absurd that I posed this question in the first place but this is actually one of the big real estate lessons we learned in 06'. We sold at the height of the market in Los Angeles and bought a great home in Rocklin, CA (20 miles east of Sacramento). On paper, everything looked great, great schools, parks, and it was even voted "one of the best places to live" in U.S. News Report (which is why I question their formula). We hated it and after two years, left everything behind to move back to the S.F. Bay Area. Because it was CA and so close to the capital, we never thought to ask about social/politics. Turns out, it was the most conservative district in the state, openly racist, no jobs and everywhere around us were signs opposing gay marriage. Every prop we ever voted for was shot down. To be surrounded by such overwhelming racism was really shocking to us and we refused to have our daughter raised around that mentality. Now, she has developed friendships with diverse families and we would like to make sure we don't make that mistake again. We don't feel the need for extreme liberal POV, but tolerance is essential.
I almost moved to one of the areas east of Sacramento myself. Out of curiosity, what did you find openly racist? That surprises me a little. I mean, your post almost sounds like a list of liberal talking points against the right. You've got "no jobs", racism, and intolerance. Just wondering if you assumed they were racist because they were conservative, or did you actually witness racism? If it's the latter, then I definitely made the right move by not moving there.

Last edited by CarawayDJ; 10-25-2010 at 11:54 AM..
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Old 10-26-2010, 01:44 AM
 
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Unfortunately, we did witness racism, homophobia and classism. The surprising part to us was that we witnessed and experienced this among the public social service agencies who have direct contact and power over the community members they are supposed to be helping. For example, social workers using racial slurs against clients and quick removal of children from families rather than providing support services and assistance first. There is a reason that houses are now worth less than half of what they were 2-3 years ago. Plus, it was 100-115 degrees almost every day from May through Oct. Oh, and boring too, unless you wanted to spend your life at the mega-mall. You definitely made the right choice!
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