U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
 [Register]
Seattle area Seattle and King County Suburbs
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-19-2011, 09:33 PM
 
304 posts, read 792,915 times
Reputation: 232

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by usernametaken View Post
I am thinking of looking for some in Seattle to replace what I do for a small company in Ohio. Any recommendations regarding the importance of contacts versus online applications? I am not in IT or computer science.
Sorry, I don't understand your question. Importance of contracts vs. online applications???
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-19-2011, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
757 posts, read 1,265,692 times
Reputation: 587
Contacts! i.e., people you know who already work in these places.

And I asked about contract work because you said something about it in another thread.

Thanks!
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 10:57 PM
 
3,117 posts, read 4,119,129 times
Reputation: 2872
Quote:
Originally Posted by seattlerain View Post
Not everybody wants to live in the suburbs...
As people get older, most of us realize that the hassles of living in a city center greatly outweigh the benefits, especially as we outgrow the whole "go get crunked every Friday night" lifestyle. Living in a downtown area is largely a young person's game. It's not to say some don't do it essentially forever, but they're the minority. Most of us go for a yard, space, schools, quiet, etc.


And a +1 to the person who pointed out that thankfully in this country we can buy the house we want, not the house we need. Yes, the house I live in is very large, and yes, only 2 of us live in it. Why? Because that's what we want. People need to worry about their own situations, we'll manage ours.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:20 PM
 
9,638 posts, read 24,975,829 times
Reputation: 5321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
As people get older, most of us realize that the hassles of living in a city center greatly outweigh the benefits, especially as we outgrow the whole "go get crunked every Friday night" lifestyle. Living in a downtown area is largely a young person's game. It's not to say some don't do it essentially forever, but they're the minority. Most of us go for a yard, space, schools, quiet, etc.


And a +1 to the person who pointed out that thankfully in this country we can buy the house we want, not the house we need. Yes, the house I live in is very large, and yes, only 2 of us live in it. Why? Because that's what we want. People need to worry about their own situations, we'll manage ours.
Well said. I've noticed a lot here on C-D, where people are asking for facts and get opinions or judgments, questions like " Where can I get a good price on a Cadillac Escalade?" and they'll get answers like " Dude, you should get a bicycle or at worst a Prius."
Re: city vs suburbs- there are a lot of neighborhoods within the Seattle city limits that are nothing like living downtown...wide streets with leafy trees, quiet, etc, but they're not exactly the suburbs either. What would you call those neighborhoods, neighborhoods like View Ridge or Magnolia? It's not really urban, and not really suburban.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:40 PM
 
Location: WA
4,246 posts, read 8,138,589 times
Reputation: 2364
It's true. We're all actually a bunch of homeless people using public internet at the library.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
I didn't sell a house in California to come up here. I still own a house almost 3 times as big as the OP's in one of the nicest parts of town. Secret? Hard work and smart investing. It's not rocket science.

To the OP - here's the deal: You'll find a lot of people on this site whining about how expensive it is to live here, but you have to keep in mind that the odds are you're not in the same boat they're in, nor would you be. Your 72K as an engineer in Michigan is probably worth 105K out here. You tack on a reasonably successful S/O, and you're making at least 160K a year, which is more than enough to afford a half a million dollar home.

You will find that this particular site is not all that indicative of the actual cross-section of the city. For example, you'll find a lot of people here who attempt to claim you should/could/will eschew the "car lifestyle". That's great if you're 23 and living in some 1 bedroom in Belltown thinking it's so great to be in the "middle of it all", and have a stance of it being more important to scrounge 5 bucks out of the couch to buy a latte instead of being able to swing a car payment. It's not so feasible when you grow up and realize that a house in the suburbs is the way to go. You'll hear people say you'll need to work 15 hours a day just to survive here - keep in mind these will be the people who don't have a solid earning potential, which it appears you do. You need to evaluate an area as it pertains to YOUR life and YOUR preferences and YOUR potential, not what other people say is and isn't feasible for you.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:46 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,008 posts, read 11,321,573 times
Reputation: 4125
To the OP:

I'm originally from Chicago, and can say that living here is like living in Chicago, only a tad more expensive, especially for groceries. The good news is that there's no state income tax.

If you got a similar job here, expect to get paid ~$110k a year. That would be the going rate AT LEAST.

The high prices comes with the territory. These are a few of the many reasons:

1) Restrictive land use and zoning rules
2) High COL because the average income is high (King Co. is 17th in the nation): $75k is the average here. Lots of Boeing, Microsoft, Amazon, pharmacy/biomed, etc. types work here, as well as lots of small business owners who make it (a friend of mine, an old TA ironically, got married and moved to Wallingford and they both make $250k combined... and they make the least of all the families they've met and inferred / deduced that).
3) Inertia. There's a lot of people (banks included) who feel they'd rather hold onto a property and take the measly 1% hit due to inflation and then sell eventually rather than take the 20%+ hit that their property value has fallen.


And, people here are a lot less desiring to own land and a house because they don't see the economic benefit, and this was true before the recession. If rental rates are 20% less than what it would cost to own a property, then it makes almost no sense to buy at the time.

If anything, it teaches people to save responsibly and/or work for that house if they want it that badly.

Also, look south of I-90 ... I'm sure you'll find more properties that are more reasonable. And unlike Chicago, we don't have (many) crime infested cesspools to avoid.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:47 PM
 
1,490 posts, read 3,326,588 times
Reputation: 702
The mistake many self-righteous Seattleites make is they automatically assume that if someone like Xanathos buys a huge house, his priorities are somehow out of whack. Who's to say that's true? It's nonsense to leap to that conclusion. Maybe an Escalade was a recently-deceased uncle's prize possession. There can be such a passive-aggressive conformity at times.

Preachy people are a turnoff, whatever they are preaching.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-19-2011, 11:53 PM
 
1,490 posts, read 3,326,588 times
Reputation: 702
Quote:
Originally Posted by usernametaken View Post
Contacts! i.e., people you know who already work in these places.

And I asked about contract work because you said something about it in another thread.

Thanks!
I'll explain...in some professions, companies will hire people (contractors) for "temporary" work, though the contractors are well-paid, can make 30-100 bucks an hour, depending on their skill set. There is usually a cap on how long you can be a contractor (Microsoft requires a significant break between contracts) but you may be offered a permanent position if you stand out.

You are generally responsible for your own benefits (or your agency may offer a basic package) and if you work through an agency, they handle your payroll taxes and FICA, etc.

Generally, contractors are easier to fund than employees and often come out of a different budget pool, so companies hiring after a recession often use contractors to keep up before a permanent position can be justified, approved and posted.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2011, 12:07 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
3,455 posts, read 6,549,264 times
Reputation: 3588
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
As people get older, most of us realize that the hassles of living in a city center greatly outweigh the benefits, especially as we outgrow the whole "go get crunked every Friday night" lifestyle. Living in a downtown area is largely a young person's game. It's not to say some don't do it essentially forever, but they're the minority. Most of us go for a yard, space, schools, quiet, etc.


And a +1 to the person who pointed out that thankfully in this country we can buy the house we want, not the house we need. Yes, the house I live in is very large, and yes, only 2 of us live in it. Why? Because that's what we want. People need to worry about their own situations, we'll manage ours.
Did you notice that I said nothing about the size of your house...why are you being so defensive about it?

Did you notice that I said nothing about living in the "center city"? Please don't put words in my mouth.

FYI, there is an ever growing number of empty nesters moving to the city...because that is what they want to.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-20-2011, 02:08 AM
 
3,117 posts, read 4,119,129 times
Reputation: 2872
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlohaHuey View Post
I'll explain...in some professions, companies will hire people (contractors) for "temporary" work, though the contractors are well-paid, can make 30-100 bucks an hour, depending on their skill set. There is usually a cap on how long you can be a contractor (Microsoft requires a significant break between contracts) but you may be offered a permanent position if you stand out.
Not entirely true. You have to take a long break after 1 year with Microsoft if you're an a-dash contractor. If you're a v-dash contractor, you can stay there as long as you like.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Settings
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2020 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top