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Old 04-21-2011, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Capital Hill
1,603 posts, read 1,271,543 times
Reputation: 779
We can't. That's why Seattle has one of the largest population of the 'sleepless' and 'homeless' in the nation. Sleepless because all we do could do was worry about how to pay the mortgage and homeless because we couldn't.
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Old 04-21-2011, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,119 posts, read 1,855,029 times
Reputation: 2506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinylly View Post
We can't. That's why Seattle has one of the largest population of the 'sleepless' and 'homeless' in the nation. Sleepless because all we do could do was worry about how to pay the mortgage and homeless because we couldn't.
The statement about the homeless is really not true. The reason there are so many here is because of the mild weather- homeless travel here because it's a bit easier to live "on the street" in this weather than in the freezing weather you get in so many other parts of the country. There have been all kinds of news programs and documentaries about this- that is why there are a lot of homeless all up and down the west coast.

And to the OP, it's been discussed here a lot already- but it just depends on where you live. Sure if you want to be in close to the core of the city you will pay an arm and a leg- but with so many people earning high wages here, it seems a lot of people can afford that. But get a bit farther out and costs are a LOT lower. Someone mentioned Renton, Auburn, etc. I live on the north end- Lynnwood- and it's far cheaper up here as well. There are new homes (not condos, regular houses) around 1500 square feet that can be had for around 250K. There are condos up in this area for under 200K.
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:36 PM
 
21 posts, read 22,183 times
Reputation: 12
Can't answer your questions too much but us natives do get very mad if you say you are from Seattle, but really you live in Bellevue, Renton, or Shoreline. Seattle is very different from those two cities, even though they are less than half an hour away. Seattle suburbs are pretty conservative compared to the city itself. Can't compare Seattle to redneck Wyoming!
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:44 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 958,113 times
Reputation: 1394
People here choose to live in smaller, dumpier houses & have less disposable income. I've noticed that many do not have attractive furniture. It's the price people pay in order to live in a beautiful area w/ lots of things to do. Many take out huge mortgages.
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:46 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 958,113 times
Reputation: 1394
Quote:
Originally Posted by jm31828 View Post
The statement about the homeless is really not true. The reason there are so many here is because of the mild weather- homeless travel here because it's a bit easier to live "on the street" in this weather than in the freezing weather you get in so many other parts of the country. There have been all kinds of news programs and documentaries about this- that is why there are a lot of homeless all up and down the west coast.

And to the OP, it's been discussed here a lot already- but it just depends on where you live. Sure if you want to be in close to the core of the city you will pay an arm and a leg- but with so many people earning high wages here, it seems a lot of people can afford that. But get a bit farther out and costs are a LOT lower. Someone mentioned Renton, Auburn, etc. I live on the north end- Lynnwood- and it's far cheaper up here as well. There are new homes (not condos, regular houses) around 1500 square feet that can be had for around 250K. There are condos up in this area for under 200K.
True, but then you live in suburbia. And many people make a major move to our city in order to experience an urban Seattle neighborhood. I didn't move here from NC in order to live in Lynnwood, you know? Just saying.
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Old 04-21-2011, 11:51 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 958,113 times
Reputation: 1394
Quote:
Originally Posted by ijoe13 View Post
About a year ago, my wife and moved from Cleveland to Seattle. We left behind our suburban 3 bedroom, 1.5 bath condo to a renter and moved into a 650 sq/ft. apartment in downtown Seattle and are much happier with our lives. We're enjoying ourselves much more in the city. Also, as of a month ago, we're car free and loving it. Public transit, cabs and zipcar have worked out very well for us.

I know what the original OP must feel since he/she is used to a big house, new car, etc (the Midwestern mentality). But you have to remember, in the big picture, those things tend not to mean as much as really enjoying life.

Good luck!

Joe
OK, I felt this way 10 years ago. But now I have 2 children, and a need for more space. Families will pay more here than in the Midwest, though like you said, may have a qualitatively different experience.
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Old 04-22-2011, 12:06 AM
 
2,528 posts, read 1,911,416 times
Reputation: 1222
Quote:
Originally Posted by ap517 View Post
Can't answer your questions too much but us natives do get very mad if you say you are from Seattle, but really you live in Bellevue, Renton, or Shoreline. Seattle is very different from those two cities, even though they are less than half an hour away. Seattle suburbs are pretty conservative compared to the city itself. Can't compare Seattle to redneck Wyoming!
And it's one of the stupidest things some of the people up here do. It's the strangest xenophobic BS I think I've seen in this country, and not something you ever see being brought up in other metro areas. Every major city has outlying suburbs. It's the rule of the game. If you live in a suburb of a city, you're "from" that core city. It's why you live in the area. You're paying the same taxes to the same county. You're making the same drives to the same restaurants. You're attending the same events and rooting for the same sports teams.

Hell, my home in Mercer Island is CLOSER to the core of Seattle than certain parts of Seattle are. If "West Seattle Gal" (I'm not picking on you, just using your user name as a nice example) and I were to each leave our houses at the exact same time to set out for the Bank of America building, I'd get there first unless she was living right near the ship docks, and even then I'd probably beat her. That's a fact. Just because I choose to actually have things like a yard and a house that's not either small or a run down dump like a huge chunk of Seattle houses are, and to get away from some of the noise does not mean I don't "live here". Especially when it's a foregone conclusion that those of us in the suburbs pretty much universally pump more into the local economy than the actual city residents themselves. Sorry, but what area you live in is not defined by whether you write "Seattle, WA" in the return address portion of a letter you mail or not.
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Old 04-22-2011, 12:40 AM
 
1,235 posts, read 958,113 times
Reputation: 1394
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xanathos View Post
And it's one of the stupidest things some of the people up here do. It's the strangest xenophobic BS I think I've seen in this country, and not something you ever see being brought up in other metro areas. Every major city has outlying suburbs. It's the rule of the game. If you live in a suburb of a city, you're "from" that core city. It's why you live in the area. You're paying the same taxes to the same county. You're making the same drives to the same restaurants. You're attending the same events and rooting for the same sports teams.

Hell, my home in Mercer Island is CLOSER to the core of Seattle than certain parts of Seattle are. If "West Seattle Gal" (I'm not picking on you, just using your user name as a nice example) and I were to each leave our houses at the exact same time to set out for the Bank of America building, I'd get there first unless she was living right near the ship docks, and even then I'd probably beat her. That's a fact. Just because I choose to actually have things like a yard and a house that's not either small or a run down dump like a huge chunk of Seattle houses are, and to get away from some of the noise does not mean I don't "live here". Especially when it's a foregone conclusion that those of us in the suburbs pretty much universally pump more into the local economy than the actual city residents themselves. Sorry, but what area you live in is not defined by whether you write "Seattle, WA" in the return address portion of a letter you mail or not.
Mercer Island is one of the most expensive areas here, so it doesn't really serve as a good example for someone asking "how do you afford it?" & earning a wage in the 70K range. Mercer Island is essentially a bridge away from downtown and is generally considered to be part of Seattle. And it's more of a rich man's paradise than a suburban area like Lynnwood, so it's no wonder you guys "pump more" into the economy.
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Old 04-22-2011, 07:24 AM
 
Location: Bothell, Washington
2,119 posts, read 1,855,029 times
Reputation: 2506
Quote:
Originally Posted by west seattle gal View Post
True, but then you live in suburbia. And many people make a major move to our city in order to experience an urban Seattle neighborhood. I didn't move here from NC in order to live in Lynnwood, you know? Just saying.
But the city is about so much more than the downtown core- all cities are. If someone is from Lenexa, Kansas they are still in "Kansas City", if someone is in Daly City they are still in "San Francisco", and though I live in Lynnwood I am still in "Seattle". That is how it is for many people- you move to a city you usually live in its suburbs, due to a wide variety of reasons. Just as your preference in moving here was not to live in Lynnwood, my preference in moving here was not to live in an overpriced area in an overcrowded "close in" neighborhood.
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Old 04-22-2011, 09:16 AM
 
205 posts, read 290,344 times
Reputation: 138
Quote:
Hell, my home in Mercer Island is CLOSER to the core of Seattle than certain parts of Seattle are. If "West Seattle Gal" (I'm not picking on you, just using your user name as a nice example) and I were to each leave our houses at the exact same time to set out for the Bank of America building, I'd get there first unless she was living right near the ship docks, and even then I'd probably beat her. That's a fact. Just because I choose to actually have things like a yard and a house that's not either small or a run down dump like a huge chunk of Seattle houses are, and to get away from some of the noise does not mean I don't "live here". Especially when it's a foregone conclusion that those of us in the suburbs pretty much universally pump more into the local economy than the actual city residents themselves. Sorry, but what area you live in is not defined by whether you write "Seattle, WA" in the return address portion of a letter you mail or not.
I'm not so sure you'd win the race from Mercer Island to downtown, especially when the 520 gets tolled in a few months and the traffic moves to I-90. How are the residents of Mercer island pumping more money into the Seattle economy than us poor Seattle home owners paying property taxes to the city of Seattle on our small run down shacks?
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