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Old 06-24-2012, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Capital Hill
1,600 posts, read 2,774,304 times
Reputation: 842

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Guts&GLori View Post
Hi All: I've read several previous threads relating to the (perceived) pros and cons of a move to Seattle, but I would sincerely appreciate some fresh perspectives. My husband and I live in the Twin Cities area of MN and have long considered a move to Seattle. I'll be honest, the majority of our visits have been during the more desirable months (July/August/September), so we're somewhat leary of what Seattle's weather is TRULY like overall. We're accustomed to stretches of grey skies (maybe not quite as many as in Seattle), either with near unbearable humidity - and bird size mosquitoes - in the Summer or sub-zero temperatures and mounds of snow/ice in the Winter. We both work in healthcare (although I'm making a leap to Animal Studies/Ecology) and are well-educated. Socially, we're very liberal and are also avid environmentalists and vegans. We love the ocean and almost all outdoor activities. Seattle seems like a great "fit" for us personally, but we've hesitated because of it's reputation for being constantly gloomy. We have friends that live in the Seattle suburbs and they've related that it is - indeed - cloudy a lot but they don't feel it lives up to it's given bad reputation. We've contemplated Seattle and SF, but SF seems like financial suicide and maybe a tad too materialistic for us (simply my experience/opinion ... I don't mean to offend anyone). I would greatly, greatly appreciate true Seattleites experiences on weather, culture, economy, etc. Thank so very much! Blessings!
Sometimes we have some sun, like today, Sunday, the sun came out at about 2:00PM. It's been smi-sunny. At least it was enough to let us know that there is a sun somewhere beyond those dark clouds. If you want to see some real sun, just go up into an airo-plane. You will see a real nice sun because those clouds are really quit low. It's like mother-nature has us cover with a wet blanket to protect us from cancer causing effects of the sun. I don't know about yesterday, I think it was real stormy and rainy, as all the other days before that. Seems like all these days of darkness are all the same, they kind of melt into each other like one dismall eternal dark millenniumal sameness. No beginning, no end, all just the same darkness, mud, rust, and rain. : think::t hink:
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Old 06-24-2012, 11:15 PM
 
18,974 posts, read 11,734,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vinylly View Post
If you want to see some real sun, just go up into an airo-plane. You will see a real nice sun because those clouds are really quit low.
This is really true. Flying in the winter is funny because you go for many days with no sun in sight, then the plane flies above the clouds and wow, who knew that was there?

Today got really nice, better than many expected, but this has been a pretty wet spring except some days in April/May.

If you've been reading these posts for a while, you will see a lot of locals that love the place but like to poke fun and even over-emphasize its faults. We've all done it and this is a place that's really not trying to sell itself. We get a lot of newcomers without trying.

At the same time, there are some that really didn't handle the weather well at all. It seems to have had such a lasting effect on them that they continue to post here complaining long after they have moved somewhere else.

So the answer is, everyone is different. How you handle the weather will really depend on how sensitive you are to limited light for certain periods of the year, whether you're vulnerable to SAD, etc. Some can live here for years, not be bothered, then all of a sudden they are. Because everyone is different, you'll see debate over it but to me, that is more honest than if everyone was a local booster, refusing to acknowledge that it could be an issue for newcomers. We say the opposite - don't just visit in the summer and think that's the way it always is, come here during the worst months first and maybe rent before you buy.
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Old 06-25-2012, 12:45 AM
 
182 posts, read 282,584 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kayela View Post
Well - I'm originally from South Dakota (lived 30 miles from MN), and I can definitely say that I FAR prefer Seattle's winter grey to sub-zero temps and blizzards. Those people who moan about the damp cold here have never lived near MN's lakes in the winter! We have little wind to speak of, it's always nice enough to be outside, there are few insects in the summer, and I don't need my 'South Dakota coat' unless I go snowshoeing up in the pass and even then it's a bit much. Quite frankly to me it's always nice here. I LOVE not having to deal with swarms of mosquitos in the summer! You can make the most of every nice evening. Between July and late-Sept I pretty much never eat inside.
Quote:
I've been to the bay area numerous times and although the weather is milder, it's more $$, and most importantly - it doesn't have the mountains and the number of outdoorsy things to do that Seattle offers.
Other than the Marine headlands, MT Tamalpais, Redwood forests, Stinson beach and the pacific ocean - all of which are either connected to or no more than 45 min from San Francisco - you are right
.

I believe the Ski resorts are about an hour from Seattle whereas they are about 3 hrs from San Francisco though. If you love skiing or cold weather type activities Seattle is a better fit.

Last edited by Count David; 06-25-2012 at 01:23 AM.. Reason: fixed quoting
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Old 06-25-2012, 01:26 AM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,414 posts, read 25,114,536 times
Reputation: 13401
OP, you may also be a good fit for Denver/Boulder, that is, if you were still willing to deal with the snow and were willing to live without Seattle's water.

Keep in mind, that this is coming from somebody who thinks Seattle has Denver beat in every way except for two (weather and cost-of living).
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Old 06-25-2012, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Twin Cities
19 posts, read 40,845 times
Reputation: 12
I am so appreciate for all of your insightful, honest comments. I will admit, that my mood and energy levels can be greatly affected by sunshine (or lack of it) during a Midwest Winter, but it's hard to really know if it's the lack of sun alone or the combination of - often - sub-zero air/wind temperatures and, sometimes, endless mounds of ice/snow (as Kayela from SD can understand) for five to six months. My husband tends to think it's the overall weather pattern. We've also thought of the Denver area, as we have family that lives near Littleton, but we just haven't quite found our niche there. Coming from the "Land of 10,000+ Lakes" and having the mighty Mississippi River in our backyard, we absolutely love being near open water. Our dream is to be near the ocean or a bay/sound leading to it. We also love greenscapes and the Denver metro seems brown and dry. We are very socially liberal and felt that Denver was more "traditional" or right-wing on social issues (please correct me if my experiences or perceptions don't ring true). We are incredibly huge environmentalists, animal lovers, and vegans. Considering all of this, we've really leaned towards Seattle and, possibly, the SF Bay area. I/we love the social side and sun of the SF Bay, but it is more crowded, crazy expensive and, seemingly, more pretentious. We're pretty granola.

I think Seacove's suggestion to visit Seattle during the "bad" months is a good plan. We thought of taking another trip out there in November. I again want to say "Thank you" again to everyone! There have been so many threads on Seattle and it's weather, social scene, economy, etc., but your new perspectives have been really helpful. We simply want to make our geographic move as best informed as possible and put our heart and souls into it. I'd love to hear more from you all...
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Old 06-25-2012, 11:56 AM
 
18,974 posts, read 11,734,876 times
Reputation: 10038
If you come in December you might want to book a night on the Christmas Ships. The schedule is usually announced around Thanksgiving so people can choose their dates. They go to a different area each night (but repeat several times during the month of December) and on the shore there are bonfires where people can gather and listen to the choir from the leading ship. It's done by Argosy Cruises, here's an article on it.
Entertainment | Every night, Christmas Ships ferry the merry | Seattle Times Newspaper

Wicked will be playing in November at the Paramount Theatre WICKED > The Paramount Theatre
The Addams Family and Elf at the 5th Avenue Theatre Boxoffice - 5th Avenue
King Tut will still be in Seattle before all the artifacts are returned to Egypt permanently in January: http://www.pacificsciencecenter.org/...the-exhibition We went yesterday and Mummies: Secrets of the Pharoahs on playing on IMAX was a good add on.

You could visit Snoqualmie Falls Visiting Snoqualmie Falls | Discover Washington State and stay a night at Salish Lodge Salish Lodge & Spa - Seattle's Luxury Hotel Resort & Spa

Definitely take a ferry to Bainbridge Island or drive to Mukilteo and take the ferry to Whidbey Island, stop in Coupeville and cross Deception Pass.
Deception Pass State Park-Whidbey Island Washington.
Seattle Ferry Route Maps

I'm not a skier (prefer snow to stay in Snoqualmie so I can visit it) but that will be the season.

That is also a great time to visit a little Bavarian town called Leavenworth:
Visit Leavenworth Washington - The Official Site of the Leavenworth Chamber of Commerce

Now if you visit and you're doing all of that, you probably aren't going to get too depressed. Which is the thing. If you're busy and getting out all the time, there's less likelihood you're going to get depressed. But when you're in the routine of working, you don't always have the time to do all the fun things that make this area so great and that's when there's a chance the overcast skies can get to you.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:08 PM
 
510 posts, read 785,114 times
Reputation: 284
Have you looked into Portland, Oregon. Similar to Seattle, yet the environmentally concerned are a little more active. The city is 'greener' with their bike system and transit, and how they restrict expanding the city into the Willamette Valley. The Portland granola crowd (generalization) seem to be more of a younger, hippy group; in Seattle it is more of older yuppies trying to be trendy. Example: Portland--organic wool and hemp clothes, maybe drive a Prius/ride a bike, concerned with everything earth impacting. Seattle--wear synthetic REI or Patagonia (North Face is sooo yesterday), almost required to drive a Subaru Outback, drinks the most exotic coffee, environmentally concerned with the big, popular environmental trends. Again, just kind of what I've observed.
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:13 PM
 
101 posts, read 175,681 times
Reputation: 69
Cons
1. Too expensive to live here IMO
2. People are not very friendly, especially true if you are used to people from the SE
3. Traffic is terrible
4. It is cold (need a jacket) 10 months out of the year (Save July, August)

Pros
1. Beautiful Scenery
2. Lots of outdoor activities available
3. Low crime rate
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Old 06-25-2012, 02:14 PM
 
18,974 posts, read 11,734,876 times
Reputation: 10038
Quote:
Originally Posted by rainforest338 View Post
Have you looked into Portland, Oregon. Similar to Seattle, yet the environmentally concerned are a little more active. The city is 'greener' with their bike system and transit, and how they restrict expanding the city into the Willamette Valley. The Portland granola crowd (generalization) seem to be more of a younger, hippy group; in Seattle it is more of older yuppies trying to be trendy. Example: Portland--organic wool and hemp clothes, maybe drive a Prius/ride a bike, concerned with everything earth impacting. Seattle--wear synthetic REI or Patagonia (North Face is sooo yesterday), almost required to drive a Subaru Outback, drinks the most exotic coffee, environmentally concerned with the big, popular environmental trends. Again, just kind of what I've observed.
You're not wrong. Seattle is much more corporate than Portland and some say has a colder feel to it.

Portland is the real deal if that is what you're looking for

Portlandia - Dream of the 90s - YouTube

Portland was not for us at all but many love it and say it's homier than Seattle.
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Old 06-25-2012, 06:52 PM
 
510 posts, read 785,114 times
Reputation: 284
Another comment for weather...just take a look at a map and you'll see mountains running down the west coast--Cascades and Sierras. The way it was explained to me is that mountainous stretch is kind of the dividing line for Arctic fronts--to the west we get lots of Pacific fronts wet, 'warm' and windy. Occasionally we get Fraser River Valley outflows which are like mini-Arctic blasts and give us the rare Strait/Sound effect snows. To the east of the mountains, the Pacific fronts lose a lot of the wind and moisture, but still bring moisture to the eastern part. They also get more of the arctic air which keeps them colder and 'drier' during winter storms. Similar to how the rockies funnel the cold air over to the plains states.
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