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Old 02-05-2008, 07:16 PM
 
108 posts, read 281,037 times
Reputation: 33

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Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteSandsYucca View Post
I love Seattle. It is my favorite US city, and I was just up there for a few days, in fact.
Quote:
Yet, sorry, I can't handle all those clouds and rain. It gets me down. I love the warm, bright rays of the sun too much. I love seeing the moon and stars.
Quote:
Thank goodness for that rain up there, because it keeps Seattle green, and keeps people out.
So, you love Seattle, but don't think you could handle the rain and conclude by saying thank goodness for the rain because it keeps people out?

Is that a clever way of saying thank goodness that it rains a lot in Seattle otherwise you'd be tempted to move here?

 
Old 02-05-2008, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Midwest USA
95 posts, read 267,074 times
Reputation: 71
^Yes, I'm basically saying that I'm glad that rainy climate keeps that town from becoming too overrun with people moving in, like what we see in the sunny cities of the Sunbelt region. What do you think made LA grow into such a gargantuan urban area within just 200 years? Basically: The weather, the sun.

I'm not trying to be clever, I'm just saying that in a protective way of Seattle. That rain even keeps me out, and I love that city as my favorite.
 
Old 02-05-2008, 07:38 PM
 
108 posts, read 281,037 times
Reputation: 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by WhiteSandsYucca View Post
^Yes, I'm basically saying that I'm glad that rainy climate keeps that town from becoming too overrun with people moving in, like what we see in the sunny cities of the Sunbelt region. What do you think made LA grow into such a gargantuan urban area within just 200 years? Basically: The weather, the sun.

I'm not trying to be clever, I'm just saying that in a protective way of Seattle. That rain even keeps me out, and I love that city as my favorite.
I get it: you love Seattle from a distance and respect its privacy.

I think Seattle's low sprawl and green scenery have a lot of appeal to especially people who live or have lived in the Southwest region. I've heard many stories about overdevelopment, overcrowding, etc, in the Southwest that I can see, even in the abstract, someone liking that Seattle is relatively well preserved even if they wouldn't live here themselves.
 
Old 02-05-2008, 08:04 PM
 
2,063 posts, read 3,137,642 times
Reputation: 2685
Default In a nutshell...

Yup.. it's all true and then some. That's why me and the family are moving to Hawaii
Koale
 
Old 06-18-2008, 09:57 PM
 
Location: Georgia, on the Florida line, right above Tallahassee
10,148 posts, read 8,316,400 times
Reputation: 5967
Still a great thread.....

Quote:
Originally Posted by wythors View Post
I thought that I would sit down and write a bit about my perceptions regarding commonly asked questions on this forum. Bear in mind that these are my opinions and should in no way be construed as anything but that.

First my qualifications to make these comments: I was born in Seattle 45 years ago. I grew up in Kennewick, in eastern WA, and returned to the wet side (intentional mis-spelling) in 1977 for my sophomore year of high school. Over the last 30 years, I have lived in Bothell, Queen Anne Hill, Magnolia, Phinney Ridge, Mountlake Terrace, south Everett, north Lynnwood, Kirkland, Mill Creek, Woodinville, Anacortes, La Conner and Edmonds. Other than 18 months spent in the LA area, I have lived my entire life in Washington. I didn’t move here then move away. I don’t look at internet statistics and pretend that I know everything there is to know about Seattle. I live here and have made it my home for most of my 45 years. These are my impressions.

The weather

Yes, it rains in the Puget Sound area. A lot. We do have four seasons here: cool and rainy, cold and rainy, windy and rainy and Summer which lasts from July 1 through Labor Day. If you can’t deal with cloudy days for months at a time, don’t bother to come here. During November, December and January the cloudy, rainy days FAR outnumber the sunny days. We don’t normally have the hard, drenching rain common in the south and on the east coast. Seattle rain falls gently, inexorably, and continuously. It is not uncommon to go for weeks at a time in the cold and rainy season without seeing the sun. Temps rarely drop below the upper twenties and most of the rainy season it stays between 40 and 50.

Snow events are quite rare here. Typically, we will see one or two days a year with snow, rarely accumulating to over two or three inches which normally will melt by the next day. When it does snow, an inch is enough to completely paralyze the city. There are two reasons for this phenomenon: 1. Seattle is very hilly and a little bit of slickness wreaks major havoc. 2. The average Seattleite in their Cherokee or Hummer H2 has no clue about how to drive in the snow. Every 5 or 6 years we will have a “major” snow event where we receive six inches or more that sticks around for a few days to a week. These are very rare and nothing gets done during this time. Schools close, mail goes undelivered and many businesses shut down for the duration. Even the forecast of possible snow will result in supermarkets being picked clean of milk, bread, toilet paper and beer during the early evening prior to the forecasted “storm”.

Summers are the only real reason to live here. Summer temperatures normally stay in the upper 70’s to the low 80’s and humidity isn’t much of an issue here. Like snow, we will see one or two days a year of truly uncomfortable heat with temps reaching the mid to upper 90’s. From early July through August we have some of the most beautiful weather the country has to offer. If you’re going to visit, that is the time to do it.



Traffic

Traffic sucks. End of story. If you live someplace that will require you to drive on the freeway between the hours of six in the morning and six thirty in the evening, you’re going to be stuck in slow traffic to one degree or another every single day. Particular trouble spots are I5 southbound from north of Everett through downtown Seattle, northbound from Federal Way into downtown Seattle and 405 any time of day in any direction. I live in Edmonds, 12 ˝ miles from my office in downtown Seattle. If I can drive it with no traffic (say early on a Saturday morning) I can make it in just about 20 minutes. A good day on the freeway will take 45 minutes. My worst record is 2 ˝ hours during a snow commute last winter. If I drive, I will normally take surface streets which, while slower on average, give me a more consistent commute of about 40 minutes. That said, contrary to what many here say, the Seattle area has a very good transit system for commuters. If you are only relying on the bus system to get you to and from work on a timely basis, it’s fantastic. My bus ride is about 50 minutes each way and I can read a book, listen to music or people watch rather than feeling my blood pressure rise while I get cut off by another oblivious driver talking on their cell phone. I certainly wouldn’t try to make do with Metro as my only means of transportation, but as a commuting vehicle, it can’t be beat. There are Park & Rides everywhere and routes follow most major arterials.

The Islands

I crack up at all the people who seem to have this fantasy that they’re going to move to Seattle and live on an island, then commute by ferry. People, you have no idea. Let’s say you get yourself a job in Redmond at the Mighty Microsoft and find your perfect home on Bainbridge Island. You tell all the folks in Grand Forks that you’re moving to the Pacific Northwest to live on an island, you pack up the kids and you’re off. On the first day, you drive the 15 minutes from home to the ferry, then you sit in the ferry line for 20 minutes while they load the boat. The ride takes 35 minutes, another 20 minutes while they unload the boat, then you get to spend 40 minutes to an hour getting to Redmond. A little over 2 hours to get to work. Now it is time to come home. The evening commute eastbound on 520 tends to be very slow. Let’s say an hour to get back to the dock. Depending on when you get there and what the load is like, you may have to wait up to an hour for the boat. During summer, this could easily double or even triple. Another 35 minutes crossing time, 20 minutes to unload and 15 to get home. You’ve spent almost 5 hours of your day on the road and spent almost $30 for the ferry. If you try it as a walk-on passenger and take the bus to work, add another hour of travel time at least, though you don’t have to worry about the boat filling up. These issues apply to all ferry runs, plus you have to consider that the boats don’t run 24/7. You could easily be stranded on one side or the other during a late night outing or have to leave an event early to catch the last boat. I live about a mile from the Edmonds ferry dock. During the summer, on Friday nights and Saturday mornings the ferry line goes past the entrance to my neighborhood and the reader board normally will say a 90 minute to two hour wait. We will often come back from the coast through Kingston and take the ferry home. It is not uncommon to have to wait for one or even two sailings to get across on a Sunday evening. Unless you work on the island or within walking distance of the ferry, it is very impractical to do. Can it be done? Yes. But I thought a bit of a reality check might be in order for those considering it. I personally know several people that have done “the island thing” and have given it up because it is just too cumbersome. One of them is standing about 10 feet from me as I type this.

People

I suppose that there really is a “Seattle Freeze”, though as a native I’ve never given it much thought. I’ve always just put it down to transplants. Most of the people that I associate with are natives and are very friendly with other native Northwesterners. Most transplants that I come into contact with are very reserved and seem to have a hard time fitting in with the locals. Seattleites as a breed tend to be rather emotionally reserved and not appreciative of loud people or those that stand out from the crowd. Since it can be hard to strike up a conversation with random people, I’d suggest joining a club or a group dedicated to a subject that interests you. My wife and I joined a car club and my brother and his wife joined a book club. Take classes relating to your interests, join a church, join a gym, or go to the dog park. Otherwise, you’ll never meet anyone.

Home Prices

Recently, the median price of a home in King County surpassed a half million dollars. What I consider to be a livable home is going to cost you at least $350,000 anywhere in the greater Puget Sound area. A woman I work with is selling her 900 s/f cinderblock house in Mountlake Terrace (kind of a slummy neighborhood) at a price of $275,000! Homes built in recent years all seem to look the same and are built on postage stamp-sized lot. Be prepared to be able to hear your neighbor in the bathroom in the morning. Rent for a one bedroom apartment in a decent area of town is going to start at around the $800 mark. Two bedrooms are $950 and up. It is going to be expensive to live here.

”Where should I live?”

This is a question that nobody can answer but you. Everybody has a different opinion and will normally recommend the place that they live because they know that it’s the best. Places that I recommend based on personal experience: Edmonds, Mukilteo, parts of Lynnwood, Mill Creek, Lake Forest Park, and most Eastside communities (including Bothell, Kirkland, Redmond, Bellevue and Issaquah). I recommend these because they are what I consider to be “nice areas”, relatively affluent and lacking in major crime problems. Areas that I would specifically avoid are mostly neighborhoods in south Seattle and nearby communities: Rainier Valley, Burien, White Center, Seatac, and several others. If you’re going to work in downtown Seattle, I wouldn’t recommend living any further north than Everett, further south than Auburn or further east than Issaquah. The commutes from any farther away will be very prohibitive and you will end up spending three or more hours a day in your car.



In summary, Seattle is a beautiful place to be. Unfortunately, it is becoming increasingly overcrowded and unpleasant to live in. My 10-year plan is to sell my home and move north to Skagit or Whatcom county where it is still relatively uncrowded and less expensive to live. Seattle just isn’t Seattle for me any more.

As I stated in the beginning, these are just my opinions. I find it odd that there are so many non-residents or short-time residents here offering their insight into life in the Puget Sound area. As a life-long resident, I marvel at the misinformation provided.

More places to do research:

The Seattle Times
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
HeraldNet - Snohomish County's Online News Source
Homepage - News, Sports, Entertainment | TheNewsTribune.com | Tacoma, WA

Bookmark this if you're thinking about moving here:
WSDOT Seattle Area Traffic - I-5: Yesler Way
 
Old 06-20-2008, 04:09 AM
 
260 posts, read 556,882 times
Reputation: 160
I have to agree with just about everything you said.

I was born in Seattle 57 years ago. I've lived in the Northgate, Ravenna-Bryant, Wedgewood, Greenlake, Beacon Hill, Capital Hill, Lynnwood/Mukilteo, and now in Sequim.

Riding the ferries sounds romantic, but it's royal pain to have to do it. We have to take a ferry to come to Seattle, and that's after driving for 45 minutes over the Hood Canal Bridge to Kingston or Bainbridge. The traffic in Poulsbo is getting terrible so we tend to just stay home. Plus ferry rates go up every year.

I have no idea what the Seattle Freeze is, but it doesn't sound like I want to.

Home prices are getting higher, but that's just the trickle down effect from the rest of the country.

In 2001 we sold our 4,000 sq ft house for $275,000 in Lynnwood, while my childhood home of a 1908 farmhouse cottage (900 sq ft) sold for $295,000 because it was close the U of W (location, location, location). In 2004 we moved into a custom built home 14 miles outside of Sequim that cost us $300,000 to build. It's now worth more than half a million, but we can't sell it due to the housing market crash. I know because we had it on the market for 10 months. Everyone said it was too big, too expensive and too far from town.

So, again, we will stay put. We had planned to move Spokane to be closer to family, but after talking to my SIL for two hours on the phone tonight, I'm beginning to think not selling our house was a blessing.

I just recently saw a quote that said "Happiness is a close-knit, loving family, in another town."

By the way, Sequim gets much less rain and a lot more sunshine, and we are surrounded by lavender... Helps for that laid back feeling.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wythors View Post
I thought that I would sit down and write a bit about my perceptions regarding commonly asked questions on this forum. Bear in mind that these are my opinions and should in no way be construed as anything but that.

First my qualifications to make these comments: I was born in Seattle 45 years ago. I grew up in Kennewick, in eastern WA, and returned to the wet side (intentional mis-spelling) in 1977 for my sophomore year of high school. Over the last 30 years, I have lived in Bothell, Queen Anne Hill, Magnolia, Phinney Ridge, Mountlake Terrace, south Everett, north Lynnwood, Kirkland, Mill Creek, Woodinville, Anacortes, La Conner and Edmonds. Other than 18 months spent in the LA area, I have lived my entire life in Washington. I didn’t move here then move away. I don’t look at internet statistics and pretend that I know everything there is to know about Seattle. I live here and have made it my home for most of my 45 years. These are my impressions.

The weather

Yes, it rains in the Puget Sound area. A lot. We do have four seasons here: cool and rainy, cold and rainy, windy and rainy and Summer which lasts from July 1 through Labor Day. If you can’t deal with cloudy days for months at a time, don’t bother to come here. During November, December and January the cloudy, rainy days FAR outnumber the sunny days. We don’t normally have the hard, drenching rain common in the south and on the east coast. Seattle rain falls gently, inexorably, and continuously. It is not uncommon to go for weeks at a time in the cold and rainy season without seeing the sun. Temps rarely drop below the upper twenties and most of the rainy season it stays between 40 and 50.

Snow events are quite rare here. Typically, we will see one or two days a year with snow, rarely accumulating to over two or three inches which normally will melt by the next day. When it does snow, an inch is enough to completely paralyze the city. There are two reasons for this phenomenon: 1. Seattle is very hilly and a little bit of slickness wreaks major havoc. 2. The average Seattleite in their Cherokee or Hummer H2 has no clue about how to drive in the snow. Every 5 or 6 years we will have a “major” snow event where we receive six inches or more that sticks around for a few days to a week. These are very rare and nothing gets done during this time. Schools close, mail goes undelivered and many businesses shut down for the duration. Even the forecast of possible snow will result in supermarkets being picked clean of milk, bread, toilet paper and beer during the early evening prior to the forecasted “storm”.

Summers are the only real reason to live here. Summer temperatures normally stay in the upper 70’s to the low 80’s and humidity isn’t much of an issue here. Like snow, we will see one or two days a year of truly uncomfortable heat with temps reaching the mid to upper 90’s. From early July through August we have some of the most beautiful weather the country has to offer. If you’re going to visit, that is the time to do it.



Traffic

Traffic sucks. End of story. If you live someplace that will require you to drive on the freeway between the hours of six in the morning and six thirty in the evening, you’re going to be stuck in slow traffic to one degree or another every single day. Particular trouble spots are I5 southbound from north of Everett through downtown Seattle, northbound from Federal Way into downtown Seattle and 405 any time of day in any direction. I live in Edmonds, 12 ˝ miles from my office in downtown Seattle. If I can drive it with no traffic (say early on a Saturday morning) I can make it in just about 20 minutes. A good day on the freeway will take 45 minutes. My worst record is 2 ˝ hours during a snow commute last winter. If I drive, I will normally take surface streets which, while slower on average, give me a more consistent commute of about 40 minutes. That said, contrary to what many here say, the Seattle area has a very good transit system for commuters. If you are only relying on the bus system to get you to and from work on a timely basis, it’s fantastic. My bus ride is about 50 minutes each way and I can read a book, listen to music or people watch rather than feeling my blood pressure rise while I get cut off by another oblivious driver talking on their cell phone. I certainly wouldn’t try to make do with Metro as my only means of transportation, but as a commuting vehicle, it can’t be beat. There are Park & Rides everywhere and routes follow most major arterials.

The Islands

I crack up at all the people who seem to have this fantasy that they’re going to move to Seattle and live on an island, then commute by ferry. People, you have no idea. Let’s say you get yourself a job in Redmond at the Mighty Microsoft and find your perfect home on Bainbridge Island. You tell all the folks in Grand Forks that you’re moving to the Pacific Northwest to live on an island, you pack up the kids and you’re off. On the first day, you drive the 15 minutes from home to the ferry, then you sit in the ferry line for 20 minutes while they load the boat. The ride takes 35 minutes, another 20 minutes while they unload the boat, then you get to spend 40 minutes to an hour getting to Redmond. A little over 2 hours to get to work. Now it is time to come home. The evening commute eastbound on 520 tends to be very slow. Let’s say an hour to get back to the dock. Depending on when you get there and what the load is like, you may have to wait up to an hour for the boat. During summer, this could easily double or even triple. Another 35 minutes crossing time, 20 minutes to unload and 15 to get home. You’ve spent almost 5 hours of your day on the road and spent almost $30 for the ferry. If you try it as a walk-on passenger and take the bus to work, add another hour of travel time at least, though you don’t have to worry about the boat filling up. These issues apply to all ferry runs, plus you have to consider that the boats don’t run 24/7. You could easily be stranded on one side or the other during a late night outing or have to leave an event early to catch the last boat. I live about a mile from the Edmonds ferry dock. During the summer, on Friday nights and Saturday mornings the ferry line goes past the entrance to my neighborhood and the reader board normally will say a 90 minute to two hour wait. We will often come back from the coast through Kingston and take the ferry home. It is not uncommon to have to wait for one or even two sailings to get across on a Sunday evening. Unless you work on the island or within walking distance of the ferry, it is very impractical to do. Can it be done? Yes. But I thought a bit of a reality check might be in order for those considering it. I personally know several people that have done “the island thing” and have given it up because it is just too cumbersome. One of them is standing about 10 feet from me as I type this.

People

I suppose that there really is a “Seattle Freeze”, though as a native I’ve never given it much thought. I’ve always just put it down to transplants. Most of the people that I associate with are natives and are very friendly with other native Northwesterners. Most transplants that I come into contact with are very reserved and seem to have a hard time fitting in with the locals. Seattleites as a breed tend to be rather emotionally reserved and not appreciative of loud people or those that stand out from the crowd. Since it can be hard to strike up a conversation with random people, I’d suggest joining a club or a group dedicated to a subject that interests you. My wife and I joined a car club and my brother and his wife joined a book club. Take classes relating to your interests, join a church, join a gym, or go to the dog park. Otherwise, you’ll never meet anyone.

Home Prices

Recently, the median price of a home in King County surpassed a half million dollars. What I consider to be a livable home is going to cost you at least $350,000 anywhere in the greater Puget Sound area. A woman I work with is selling her 900 s/f cinderblock house in Mountlake Terrace (kind of a slummy neighborhood) at a price of $275,000! Homes built in recent years all seem to look the same and are built on postage stamp-sized lot. Be prepared to be able to hear your neighbor in the bathroom in the morning. Rent for a one bedroom apartment in a decent area of town is going to start at around the $800 mark. Two bedrooms are $950 and up. It is going to be expensive to live here.

”Where should I live?”

This is a question that nobody can answer but you. Everybody has a different opinion and will normally recommend the place that they live because they know that it’s the best. Places that I recommend based on personal experience: Edmonds, Mukilteo, parts of Lynnwood, Mill Creek, Lake Forest Park, and most Eastside communities (including Bothell, Kirkland, Redmond, Bellevue and Issaquah). I recommend these because they are what I consider to be “nice areas”, relatively affluent and lacking in major crime problems. Areas that I would specifically avoid are mostly neighborhoods in south Seattle and nearby communities: Rainier Valley, Burien, White Center, Seatac, and several others. If you’re going to work in downtown Seattle, I wouldn’t recommend living any further north than Everett, further south than Auburn or further east than Issaquah. The commutes from any farther away will be very prohibitive and you will end up spending three or more hours a day in your car.



In summary, Seattle is a beautiful place to be. Unfortunately, it is becoming increasingly overcrowded and unpleasant to live in. My 10-year plan is to sell my home and move north to Skagit or Whatcom county where it is still relatively uncrowded and less expensive to live. Seattle just isn’t Seattle for me any more.

As I stated in the beginning, these are just my opinions. I find it odd that there are so many non-residents or short-time residents here offering their insight into life in the Puget Sound area. As a life-long resident, I marvel at the misinformation provided.

More places to do research:

The Seattle Times
Seattle Post-Intelligencer
HeraldNet - Snohomish County's Online News Source
Homepage - News, Sports, Entertainment | TheNewsTribune.com | Tacoma, WA

Bookmark this if you're thinking about moving here:
WSDOT Seattle Area Traffic - I-5: Yesler Way
 
Old 06-20-2008, 04:16 AM
 
260 posts, read 556,882 times
Reputation: 160
Silver Wolf was filmed in Vancouver BC in Canada...

Quote:
Originally Posted by 41Willys View Post
I wanna check out north of Seattle. I just watched "Silver Wolf" with my daughter. It takes place in Northern Wa. I believe.

Taking away the quality of life Seattle had not too long ago makes alot of sense.
(I saw this comment in another thread)
 
Old 06-20-2008, 04:19 AM
 
260 posts, read 556,882 times
Reputation: 160
Whidbey Island is beautiful and fun in the summer and spring, but be prepared for lots of power outages there... They tend to get the brunt of the wind storms that come down the Straits.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 41Willys View Post
Never been there but hear so many good stories about it! (BC) It's kinda the same weather there no? I just saw "The last Mimzy" as well. It was suppose to be Seattle and Whidbey Island.
 
Old 06-20-2008, 04:23 AM
 
260 posts, read 556,882 times
Reputation: 160
Vancouver is getting like Seattle.. lots of people, lots of traffic and expensive to live there... but some of the best stores for shopping!!

Most movies that are suppose to take place in Seattle are actually filmed in Vancouver. There is a new movie that takes place in Forks (about an hour away from Port Angeles), but it was so expensive to get a film crew up there, they filmed it in Oregon and make it look like Forks and Port Angeles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sean98125 View Post
The Last Mimzy was also filmed in BC.

Vancouver is one of the world's great cities, in my opinion.
 
Old 06-20-2008, 10:00 AM
 
965 posts, read 3,340,652 times
Reputation: 141
Cody Banks?
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