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Old 10-18-2007, 08:21 AM
 
3,557 posts, read 6,705,794 times
Reputation: 2262
Washington State has 3 floating bridges. Only two of them ever sank.
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Old 10-18-2007, 11:58 AM
 
40 posts, read 136,018 times
Reputation: 22
Sean, are you serious...2 out of 3. That's scary.
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:23 PM
 
Location: The Great State of Texas, Finally!
5,224 posts, read 7,493,264 times
Reputation: 2191
With a little help from the weather, yea.
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Old 10-18-2007, 12:41 PM
 
52 posts, read 155,403 times
Reputation: 18
That IS scary....were there people on it?? Why does WA have floating bridges anyway? Why not have normal bridges?
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Old 10-18-2007, 01:02 PM
 
5,601 posts, read 12,267,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GR8Scott View Post
Sean, are you serious...2 out of 3. That's scary.

I really don’t think you should be that scared, GR8Scott. Personally, I’d be more scared about steel bridges failing like the one that recently collapsed in Minnesota. Both the Hood Canal bridge and the I-90 bridge sank during windstorms.

The Hood Canal bridge drawspan was open at the time to relieve pressure and closed to traffic because of the weather. The winds at the time were 80 MPH, gusting to almost 120 MPH. There’s always been a controversy about the bridge being built on salt water where it is subject to tide fluctuations but the bottom line for the February 1979 sinking was specifically the wind.

The I-90 bridge was under renovation and was closed to traffic to begin with. Some blame that disaster on bad decisions and errors pertaining to the reconstruction process that the bridge was undergoing at the time. The actual sinking in 1990 was due to water getting into the pontoons due to a storm which was happening. The bridge no longer has a drawspan to open during a wind storm but is engineered to now sustain high winds. The old I-90 bridge did have a drawspan and a buldge in the middle where motorist had to swerve twice around this obstacle and to add to that danger, it had reversible lanes where rush hour where traffic would be swerving around this buldge with only inches to spare between oncoming traffic. Oh, the memories!

The point is, that during high winds, conditions are monitored closely and traffic will be stopped. This is especially true on the SR-520 bridge where the wind conditions are monitored very closely and the bridge closed if warranted. It’s known that the SR-520 bridge is under-engineered and eventually will fail if not replaced soon. That is scary for its own reasons.

Here is a news clip for King5 of the I-90 bridge sinking on YouTube for those who have not seen it:


YouTube - I90 Bridge Sinks

We’ve posted this vid before but here is a simulation of a failure of the SR-520 bridge from the WDOT website on YouTube:


YouTube - SR 520 Floating Bridge - Simulated failure by wind storm
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Old 10-18-2007, 01:07 PM
 
5,601 posts, read 12,267,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chelsielea View Post
That IS scary....were there people on it?? Why does WA have floating bridges anyway? Why not have normal bridges?
No, Chelsielea, nobody was injured in either incident as both sinkings had some lead time as, again, both were storm related so they knew the problems were developing.

Floating bridges are sometimes more economically feasible than to build another type of bridge in these types of applications.
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Old 10-20-2007, 12:59 AM
 
62 posts, read 367,436 times
Reputation: 66
We used to have yearly earthquake drills in elementary school. Other than that, the thought of earthquakes rarely crosses my mind. Sometimes when I am stuck in traffic atop the Lake Union bridge I might get a fleeting "what if."

Just my opinion but the big earthquake in 2001 was the Big One, it was just very close to the surface so it didnt cause a lot of damage, but it was high on the richter scale. Glad I was out of town for that one, heh heh.

Dont worry about earthquakes. You have more of a chance of being struck by lightening and getting hit by a car all in the same day. Don't live your life in fear. Besides, you have excellent chances of survival in earthquakes. think about the poor people in the midwest whose lives are in danger due to tornados, or east coast hurricanes? We are lucky in Seattle to not have such fears.
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Old 10-20-2007, 01:03 AM
 
62 posts, read 367,436 times
Reputation: 66
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean98125 View Post
Earthquakes? It's the volcanoes you have to worry about.

They say when Mount Rainier blows its lid mud/lava is going to cover the entire south seattle valley, Kent, Renton, Auburn...yikes!
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Old 11-27-2007, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Sumner, WA
330 posts, read 544,715 times
Reputation: 192
The ground of the Auburn/Kent and Puyallup Valleys have been filled by previous mud flows from Mt. Rainier. This is shown in an exhibit at the Washington State History Museum in Tacoma. So it is likely that when Mt. Rainier erupts again, the flows will reach these valleys again. The government has posted signs all around the valley designating paths to take to go up the neighboring hills/cities in case of lahars.

But I am definitely concerned about the big one. It is likely going to be centralized in Southern California, but, as listed at the end of the movie title The Great Los Angeles Earthquake, the entire Western half of North America is expected to feel something from it. Seattle and Portland are to expect a 9.0 when the Big One its, just as if the epicenter was in the Northwest.
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Old 11-27-2007, 05:47 PM
 
97 posts, read 291,292 times
Reputation: 33
I would be more concerned about Tsunami's rather than the wake of a massive quake. Many structures are up to code and if our recent earthquakes are any indication of how well the city preformed and will preform, we will be doing pretty good when a big one hits. Concerns are mostly for Tsunami's and Mt. Rainier. The largest Tsunami in history was from eons ago and happened near Vancouver, British Columbia from some quake in the middle of the pacific. Mt. Rainier will most likely devestate the town of Orting and somewhat hurt Puyallup. Auburn's White River will hurt the city as well but I am not familiar how developed it is around that river.
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