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Old 11-07-2019, 05:26 PM
 
13 posts, read 2,822 times
Reputation: 30

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Anomalies will become the norm. It's alarming that the drought conditions of the ever-longer summers (now beginning in May) are extending into, or re-appearing in, late fall/early winter. The NW can muddle through summer droughts (though not without significant stress to the trees and soil), but when those conditions become year-round, if only sporadically year-round, what then?

Let us hope and pray, that western WA isn't climatically becoming California. There's an awful lot of fire fuel in them that forests. Be d@mn careful what you wish for!
This is weather, not climate. Dry streaks happen and so do wet spells. Neither instance provides much evidence of climate change, which is measured on an entirely different timescale. Climate averages are based around on anomalies. Perfectly static weather does not exist, and never has or will.

And I encourage you to actually research climate data if it's an issue that concerns you so much. There isn't really any evidence to support a link between drier falls (or years) and warming temperatures in the PNW, as decades of actual weather data go to show. Rather than spreading hyperbole and alarmism, try dedicating your time on the issue to understanding and research.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:36 PM
Status: "Damp" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Seattle
2,058 posts, read 1,143,605 times
Reputation: 3792
I've had a over 50 autumns here and remember a number that were brighter and dryer than most- almost all the way to Thanksgiving.

No apologies or guilt for enjoying this one.
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Old 11-07-2019, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Seattle
5,424 posts, read 3,301,068 times
Reputation: 3828
It's my fault. Drought wherever I go.
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Old 11-07-2019, 06:56 PM
 
234 posts, read 111,107 times
Reputation: 275
week or 2 is not a drought enjoy the dry weather its rare around here
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:08 PM
 
2,618 posts, read 1,354,523 times
Reputation: 10892
It worries me. I want my rain back.
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Portal to the Pacific
5,505 posts, read 5,340,233 times
Reputation: 6832
Quote:
Originally Posted by fruityfred11 View Post
This is weather, not climate. Dry streaks happen and so do wet spells. Neither instance provides much evidence of climate change, which is measured on an entirely different timescale. Climate averages are based around on anomalies. Perfectly static weather does not exist, and never has or will.

And I encourage you to actually research climate data if it's an issue that concerns you so much. There isn't really any evidence to support a link between drier falls (or years) and warming temperatures in the PNW, as decades of actual weather data go to show. Rather than spreading hyperbole and alarmism, try dedicating your time on the issue to understanding and research.
Only time will answer if it is hyperbole, not you...
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Old 11-07-2019, 07:53 PM
 
1,701 posts, read 1,093,130 times
Reputation: 3081
It feels wonderful to be without so much rain. Please take the rain be where people pray for it.
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Old 11-07-2019, 08:13 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
80,130 posts, read 73,100,062 times
Reputation: 79098
Quote:
Originally Posted by fruityfred11 View Post
This is weather, not climate. Dry streaks happen and so do wet spells. Neither instance provides much evidence of climate change, which is measured on an entirely different timescale. Climate averages are based around on anomalies. Perfectly static weather does not exist, and never has or will.

And I encourage you to actually research climate data if it's an issue that concerns you so much. There isn't really any evidence to support a link between drier falls (or years) and warming temperatures in the PNW, as decades of actual weather data go to show. Rather than spreading hyperbole and alarmism, try dedicating your time on the issue to understanding and research.
I know this. But today's weather can become the next decade's climate. This could be the beginning of a trend; we won't know until years down the line. But I find it worrisome. I don't think this dry spell is limited to the PacNW. I think it may be related to the high front off of CA, prevention rain from reaching that state. It's possible, that global climate changes will be less localized than before. In any case, we'll find out eventually.
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Old 11-07-2019, 09:04 PM
 
13 posts, read 2,822 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by flyingsaucermom View Post
Only time will answer if it is hyperbole, not you...

Sounds like some very scientific logic you have there!
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Old 11-07-2019, 09:28 PM
 
13 posts, read 2,822 times
Reputation: 30
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I know this. But today's weather can become the next decade's climate. This could be the beginning of a trend; we won't know until years down the line. But I find it worrisome. I don't think this dry spell is limited to the PacNW. I think it may be related to the high front off of CA, prevention rain from reaching that state. It's possible, that global climate changes will be less localized than before. In any case, we'll find out eventually.

Luckily we already have decades of data to pour through if we wish to determine whether a climate trend may be emerging.

As an example, precipitation has been measured in the same location at Seatac since 1945. The decade by decade data suggests no long term trends or strong link to temperature warming

Seattle average annual precipitation by decade

2010-18: 42.92"
2000-09: 36.24"
1990-99: 39.93"
1980-89: 34.93
1970-79: 37.22"
1960-69: 38.89"
1950-59: 41.72"
1945-49: 39.27"

No clear long term trend, and this decade has actually been the wettest one to date. In other words, nothing would suggest that the PNW is fast becoming California weather-wise. And it's also no shock that we are experiencing a drier year in 2019, as it represents something of a regression to the mean after a very long wet stretch.
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