U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
 [Register]
Seattle area Seattle and King County Suburbs
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-12-2009, 12:58 AM
 
1,294 posts, read 3,013,426 times
Reputation: 384

Advertisements

I have a question regarding the recent H1N1 outbreaks. I have been keeping up with sites like Seattletimes and Seattlepi and I was wondering is it really as bad as the media is making it out to be over there?

I read about the 2,000 or so at WSU and the PAX (international) outbreak and I am wondering are the two related? What caused 2,000 people at WSU to be infected this quickly? Are people dying from it (I have not heard any deaths being related) or have most of them been treated by now and what's their condition? Do you have enough vaccines to go around?

I am really worried about the recent outbreak there, and it is right before we move. Are they expecting more cases there as the fall/winder approaches? The reason I ask is we want to bring the kids. I know it is spreading everywhere in the world but as of late Washington state seems to be at the center of the news.. Sorry about all the questions but can someone who has been able to follow this more locally clear this up for me?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-12-2009, 01:21 AM
 
56 posts, read 156,408 times
Reputation: 20
The fact is, H1N1 is not much different in terms of symptoms or severity than seasonal influenza. What makes it different is that we have no previous immunity to it, making it much more likely for you to catch the flu, although unless you are are senior, small child, or someone with previous health conditions, you are extremely unlikely to become extremely sick or die from it. It's estimated that 50% of the US population with catch the H1N1 virus. So of course there is reason for serious concern about the flu, but I would treat it just like the regular flu.

The news has a tendacy to exaggerate. I wouldn't get the vaccine unless you are high risk (i.e. senior citizen, pre-existing health conditions, etc.). Just continue to do as anyone should normally be doing; periodically washing hands with soap, covering your coughs with your arm, getting enough sleep, drinking fluids, etc.

CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu
Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Swine Flu - Influenza A | Reuters.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 06:29 AM
 
948 posts, read 853,885 times
Reputation: 415
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders15 View Post
I have a question regarding the recent H1N1 outbreaks. I have been keeping up with sites like Seattletimes and Seattlepi and I was wondering is it really as bad as the media is making it out to be over there?

I read about the 2,000 or so at WSU and the PAX (international) outbreak and I am wondering are the two related? What caused 2,000 people at WSU to be infected this quickly? Are people dying from it (I have not heard any deaths being related) or have most of them been treated by now and what's their condition? Do you have enough vaccines to go around?

I am really worried about the recent outbreak there, and it is right before we move. Are they expecting more cases there as the fall/winder approaches? The reason I ask is we want to bring the kids. I know it is spreading everywhere in the world but as of late Washington state seems to be at the center of the news.. Sorry about all the questions but can someone who has been able to follow this more locally clear this up for me?
Schools, even colleges, are prime breeding grounds for passing viruses around (flu, mono, menengitis, etc.) Close quarters and kids are very social. WA schools aren't the only ones with high rates of infection. Atlanta, GA and Florida are seeing high rates of this flu at the colleges.

Last edited by shoegal111; 09-12-2009 at 06:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 10:57 AM
 
Location: West Seattle/Delridge
309 posts, read 499,880 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by frostyrides View Post
The fact is, H1N1 is not much different in terms of symptoms or severity than seasonal influenza. What makes it different is that we have no previous immunity to it, making it much more likely for you to catch the flu, although unless you are are senior, small child, or someone with previous health conditions, you are extremely unlikely to become extremely sick or die from it. It's estimated that 50% of the US population with catch the H1N1 virus. So of course there is reason for serious concern about the flu, but I would treat it just like the regular flu.

The news has a tendacy to exaggerate. I wouldn't get the vaccine unless you are high risk (i.e. senior citizen, pre-existing health conditions, etc.). Just continue to do as anyone should normally be doing; periodically washing hands with soap, covering your coughs with your arm, getting enough sleep, drinking fluids, etc.

CDC 2009 H1N1 Flu
Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Swine Flu - Influenza A | Reuters.com
Working in healthcare, I agree with this post. I do want say however that the NUMBER ONE way to prevent transmission is WASHING YOUR HANDS REGULARLY! Keep a hand sanitizer handy when you can't get to facilities.

If EVERYONE was doing this, we would have little to worry about. Problem is people don't think it's that important. Our hands are the most effective delivery method of disease.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 11:15 AM
 
1,570 posts, read 4,339,536 times
Reputation: 600
Well yes, of course Washington is the center of the local news (like the Seattle Times that you're reading, etc.). At the national level, the CDC (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2009/09/10/national/w065059D78.DTL - broken link) said this week that the virus is widespread in:

Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Guam. Just two states (neither WA) have no cases.

Like someone else said, the SE part of the country is particularly affected right now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anders15 View Post
I know it is spreading everywhere in the world but as of late Washington state seems to be at the center of the news..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 11:41 AM
 
Location: LQA, Seattle, Washington
461 posts, read 847,275 times
Reputation: 171
They're warning us at the University of Washington as well. It's just like the flu, actually in some cases it's a milder version, and less widespread so I don't get the big deal.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 11:43 AM
 
948 posts, read 853,885 times
Reputation: 415
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichaelinWA View Post
Well yes, of course Washington is the center of the local news (like the Seattle Times that you're reading, etc.). At the national level, the CDC (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2009/09/10/national/w065059D78.DTL - broken link) said this week that the virus is widespread in:

Alaska, Arizona, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee and Guam. Just two states (neither WA) have no cases.

Like someone else said, the SE part of the country is particularly affected right now.
That was me. Cornell Univ. in the Northeast has it going thru it's population too and one student died from it. I'm in one of those high risk catagories since I have asthma. I'm not too worried and neither is my doctor as long as I take the appropriate precautions like washing my hands, not touching my face, getting both flu shots vaccines and a pneumonia vaccine. My understanding is that it is the secondary infections like pneumonia that are the danger with this flu in addition to the fact that the virus itself is so new that no one has built up any resistance to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-12-2009, 11:51 AM
 
2,089 posts, read 2,580,684 times
Reputation: 4216
Quote:
Originally Posted by frostyrides View Post
The fact is, H1N1 is not much different in terms of symptoms or severity than seasonal influenza. What makes it different is that we have no previous immunity to it, making it much more likely for you to catch the flu, although unless you are are senior, small child, or someone with previous health conditions, you are extremely unlikely to become extremely sick or die from it. It's estimated that 50% of the US population with catch the H1N1 virus. So of course there is reason for serious concern about the flu, but I would treat it just like the regular flu.

The news has a tendacy to exaggerate. I wouldn't get the vaccine unless you are high risk (i.e. senior citizen, pre-existing health conditions, etc.).
Your information is slightly incorrect. I'm a medical/veterinary writer and work for two flu researchers.

H1N1 causes the body to mount a major cytokine storm reaction, which is stronger in healthy children and young adults, but less so in seniors, ironically because their immune system isn't as robust. So it is NOT like seasonal flu. Many of the deaths from H1N1 have been in younger persons - just as in the 1918 flu epidemic that killed millions.

From what I've been told, the vaccine will be given preferentially to pregnant women, who have experienced the most severe morbidity, and then to younger people. Unless there is plenty of vaccine to go around, I doubt seniors will be encouraged to get it. I'm 55 and I'll pass on it even if my HMO offers it, but I'm trying very hard to convince my college-age son to get the vaccine at his school. Seniors should, however, make sure to get this year's seasonal flu vaccine, as usual.

I don't trust much of what the media says about anything scientific. For example, a couple weeks ago there was a big flap about H1N1 being spread to turkeys in Chile, and the article I read implied that there was a great danger of the virus reassorting with the H5N1 bird flu. That IS a major concern, but not in Chile. H5N1 has not made it to the Americas yet, so the main danger in that case was to the poultry, and it also served as a reminder that it's a poor public health policy to raise pigs and poultry near each other since pigs serve as a "mixing vessel" for Type A flu viruses.

You are correct that the best way to keep from getting infected is to wash your hands often, for 20 seconds at a time, and keep your hands away from your face.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 12:19 AM
 
36 posts, read 45,452 times
Reputation: 37
I think both the flu and the cases being reported are inflated or hyped. The vaccine has had little research and side affects from an experimental drug can be serious and then some. I know a lot of people that are going to skip getting this vaccine whether they are offered it free or not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-14-2009, 09:50 AM
 
Location: Duvall, WA
1,677 posts, read 4,261,214 times
Reputation: 603
My husband had H1N1 back at the end of July. I have 2 children under 2 years old, and their pediatrician didn't even want to see them when they started exhibiting symptoms. She told us unless they were high risk (with diabetes or asthma), or had fevers of over 104 for 3-4 days, there was nothing they were going to do for them.

All and all it was much less of a big deal than the media made it out to be. My husband was sick for about 10 days, my kids were sick for about 5.

V. =)
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
Similar Threads
View detailed profiles of:

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top