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Old 10-20-2009, 10:17 AM
 
1,634 posts, read 2,559,714 times
Reputation: 956
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnStockton View Post
This is one thing I have always thought when dealing with people that want to live in seattle:

If you like seattle, why not actually live in the bay area? it is essentially seattle but much more beautiful, bustling, and with FAR better weather. You don't have to deal with the depressing weather that WILL EVENTUALLY take a very big toll on you (trust me I know personally).

I mean, if you like seattle, why not just move to a premium version of it: The Bay?
Nope, neither Seattle nor Bay area is no version of each other. In fact, both the Bay as well as Seattle are no versions of anything. Yes, no doubt about it. Seattle is Seattle. Bay area is just that: Bay area. No version! If you questioning my language, I'm questioning the logic of your thinking.

Last edited by movingwiththewind; 10-20-2009 at 10:30 AM..
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Old 10-20-2009, 10:35 AM
 
99 posts, read 95,030 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by movingwiththewind View Post
Nope, neither Seattle nor Bay area is no version of each other. In fact, both the Bay as well as Seattle are no versions of anything. Yes, no doubt about it. Seattle is Seattle. Bay area is just that: Bay area. No version! If you questioning my language, I'm questioning the logic of your thinking.

I guess what I was trying to say is that if a liberal metropolitan area is what tickles your fancy, the Bay provides FAR more tickling than Seattle. Frisco is just so much better in every way imaginable.
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:05 AM
 
33 posts, read 38,797 times
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Wow. Every way imaginable, and not by a small margin either. I love both cities, but what makes the bay area great isn't what makes Seattle great and vice versa. Both are liberal and by the water, but that's about it.
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:29 AM
 
9,855 posts, read 6,948,143 times
Reputation: 9080
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnStockton View Post
I guess what I was trying to say is that if a liberal metropolitan area is what tickles your fancy, the Bay provides FAR more tickling than Seattle. Frisco is just so much better in every way imaginable.
You obviously don't know much about the Bay Area judging from your use of the term "Frisco."

Living in San Francisco is exciting if you can afford it; Oakland and Berkeley aren't bad in parts. However, the rest of the Bay Area however is fairly boring suburbia--not much better than Seattle suburbs(I grew up near the Bay Area). Yes, you have the coast in NorCal; but Seattle has some of the best access to mountains and outdoor beauty of any major city in the US.

Honestly, the main benefit to living in Seattle (and Vancouver and Portland) is the access to the outdoors. People move to the Pacific NW expecting a smaller New York or something and it just ain't like that up here. And if I wanted New York, I'd just move to freakin' New York.
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Seattle Area
3,274 posts, read 4,258,232 times
Reputation: 3067
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnStockton View Post
This is one thing I have always thought when dealing with people that want to live in seattle:

If you like seattle, why not actually live in the bay area? it is essentially seattle but much more beautiful, bustling, and with FAR better weather. You don't have to deal with the depressing weather that WILL EVENTUALLY take a very big toll on you (trust me I know personally).

I mean, if you like seattle, why not just move to a premium version of it: The Bay?
Stating that the Bay area is more beautiful and has better weather is just an opinion...
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:38 AM
 
99 posts, read 95,030 times
Reputation: 62
Quote:
Originally Posted by seattlerain View Post
Stating that the Bay area is more beautiful and has better weather is just an opinion...

Ok, obviously I was going under the assumption that most people don't like gloomy weather and constant rain. Now, if that is what someone loves, then there is no better metropolitan area in america than seattle
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Old 10-20-2009, 11:40 AM
 
1,634 posts, read 2,559,714 times
Reputation: 956
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnStockton View Post
I guess what I was trying to say is that if a liberal metropolitan area is what tickles your fancy, the Bay provides FAR more tickling than Seattle. Frisco is just so much better in every way imaginable.
I'd not say SF it's better. It's just different. There are many ways imaginable where Seattle is much better. There are many criteria to consider. In some aspects, SF may be better than Seattle. For example, urbanity. In others, Seattle will beat the hell out of SF. For example, summer weather, or number of people per square foot. It depends of what are you asking for. SF has many of aspects NYC has, things I'm trying to escape. I like many things about SF. Overall, I prefer Seattle. For me, Seattle is better.
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Old 10-20-2009, 12:16 PM
 
42 posts, read 114,870 times
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I think I can answer this for you......

I grew up outside of NYC and moved to Seattle over 10 years ago....moved to the Southeast five years later, back to NYC metro last summer--and now, due to my husband's career, we are now reconsidering moving back to Seattle. If we do so, we hope it will be our last move which means we are giving serious credo to the issues you bring up. I adore Seattle and it remains one of my favorite places on earth--though it absolutely did not start out that way!

When I moved to Seattle, I had just completed a decade of living in Manhattan and expected Seattle to be the same. All I knew from the city was based on Frasier and my own experiences living in NY. Suffice it to say that Frasier had VERY LITTLE relevance to Seattle and in fact, the Frasier lifestyle was more reminiscent of NYC or Chicago than Seattle.....

First of all, very few residents lived in high rises--it was then (probably less so today) a city where people lived in townhouses in places like Queen Ann or in the suburbs... After running into celebrities on a regular basis in Manhattan, Seattle seemed VERY removed from the mainstream. EVERYTHING bugged me about it--from the time difference, to the way people dressed (or didn't dress), to what I perceived as a complete lack of culture. The Art Museum, as an example, seemed to me to compare more to a suburban art gallery than an actual museum..... There were no Italians or Jews or bagels or delis or subs or pizza....and I was probably the only person in my office who talked with my hands. Instead of wearing summer clothes, I was wearing a jacket to work in June....I was miserable...

Looking back, I can now see a few obvious things--for one, I was young and homesick. For two, having never moved before I was looking to find NYC within Seattle....and trying to find the familiar in the decidedly unfamiliar.

It literally was a matter of perspective and a good example of this is how I viewed the weather. If the day started out cloudy, I assumed it was a rainy day the way one would assume in the Northeast. In Seattle, however, the fog often settles over the Sound and thus the days might start out looking foggy even by noontime, the sun will be out and stay high and bright much later than in would in NYC.

Overtime, I fell in love with the local flavor.....things literally started to sneak up on me. My husband and I began going to Mariners' game that first summer--tickets were cheap and we had few friends so that became our go-to. The stadium was BEAUTIFUL and new and shiny. Tickets were affordable and accessible--meanwhile, in NY, I think I went to see the Yankees play once. At the Stadium I sampled my first cow-chip cookie and Tully's latte. From there, I became hooked on coffee....which in Seattle, can be bought at little drive through kiosks everywhere. In the Public Market, at a little stand called the Market Grill, I discovered blackened salmon. It definitely started with coffee and food, but overtime and as we began to explore the surroundings, I found more and more to love....

We discovered Alki beach on weekends--literally a little bohemian beach community right in Seattle. We took the Ferry to Bainbridge Island and then to Victoria.....and then to the San Juan Islands--still one of the most beautiful places I have ever visited. We hiked Mt Psi and Snoqualmie Falls. When the summer finally arrived, it arrived with gusto and I still remember fondly boating on Lake Washington, that first summer, and watching the blue angels fly their F16s into the horizon with Mt. Ranier in the backdrop, looking like a giant ice cream cone popping out of the clouds.

Within the year, we moved to the Eastside where we bought a home for a fraction of our NE place but eqipped with many more amenities--bookcases, landscaping, architectural details. In our little town, there was an beach park nearby and lots of summer concerts in the summer. We noticed our money going further than it ever had before because you know how $$ the Northeast is.... You can live WELL in Seattle and not make a killer salary....there is no state income tax and things simply cost less, Experiences and items are accessible and affordable in ways they are simply not in the Northeast. Even though we were young and starting out in our careers, we had a ton of fun and expanded our horizons in ways we could not have imagined. We skied in the winter--an hour's drive away. We climbed Mt. Ranier, skied at Whistler, vacationed in Idaho, explored the Oregon coast, ... We saw the Who at the Colombia Gorge--the stage aloft in front of the descending sun on the gorge. We toured wineries outside of Seattle and began to collect wine in earnest....We made friends with other transplants and with locals and created a community around us.

I had my children in Seattle and endured a life-threatening illness in Seattle, and let me tell you, the hospitals and medical system are top notch. Not only are the facilities immaculate, but the doctors are ego free and incredibly competent. More than anything else I discovered the advantages to living in a smaller and newer city. Seattle may never compare to NYC or DC in scale or gravitas, no, but it offers a much higher standard of living to the average person. Even today, with housing being through the roof, I still find Seattle infinitely more affordable than the Northeast.

I believe, as well, that this translates into a healthier atmosphere.... We certainly found we had better work-life balance. My husband and I firmly believe our happiest years were spent in Seattle....

Now we have two kids and we have a few concerns about going back: Education is one.... Being raised as inherent east-coast school snobs, we worry that the educational standards may not match what is available here. But of course, Seattle has surprised us before and what do we know? We certainly don't have first hand experience with the schools yet, and Seattle has already surprised us once before.....Certainly the state SAT scores are incredibly impressive.

Our daughter is a dancer and an artist, and I do mourn the ability to raise her near a cultural center like NYC, so that remains a concern.....

But all in all, I think Seattle is a magnificent place to live..... To directly answer your question, you will ABSOLUTELY feel directly removed from being in the "center of the world"--something that never went away. For me, it was replaced by something more valuable: the feeling that I lived inside this tiny hidden gem that nobody knew about....and it made me feel special to know I had such a rich and varied and balanced life. In the end, I found that nourished me in a much more fundamental way than being around the hustle and bustle of NYC. Even living back here outside of NYC, I still long for that feeling of richness....I literally felt we experienced MORE life there versus here, where I feel much more of an OBSERVER of life vs being an active participant. I think that is why we have been considering making this last move to Seattle and literally settling there permanently to raise our kids.....

Relative to the weather, I found Seattle to be a moderate climate year round. I was not "outdoorsy" before but became so there, hiking year around. I did not find it as dark as expected, and I do suffer from SAD. I think being outdoors more counterbalanced the shorter days....

HTH...

PM me with any questions.

Hope this helps.

Last edited by KikiMonster; 10-20-2009 at 12:37 PM..
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Old 10-20-2009, 12:40 PM
 
8,201 posts, read 14,302,454 times
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What a great post, Kiki. it echoes a lot of my feelings, though I moved out here from the NYC area 30 years ago.
Also, it's not that there are NO Jews here. There's me and six others. And the pizza scene has definitely improved. I just went to one near Seward Park called Flying Squirrel, and it's one of the few places in Seattle that has that thin but not too thin, slightly charred crust that you can fold, very reminiscent of NYC pies.
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Old 10-20-2009, 01:09 PM
 
129 posts, read 255,437 times
Reputation: 43
Great post, Kiki

I think its always important to realize that different places can be be better/worse for us at various phases of life.


























mod interpose: good place to end this thread as it is having the tendency to entertain off topic banter. The OP seems to have had his/her inquiry satisfied. If OP wants to re-open, contact a moderator. thanks.

Last edited by scirocco22; 10-20-2009 at 10:59 PM..
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