U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
 [Register]
Seattle area Seattle and King County Suburbs
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-12-2009, 04:53 AM
 
40 posts, read 65,629 times
Reputation: 16
Default Brick houses?

Hi all,
I have been spending some time looking at houses in the Seattle area and it strikes me as very different from Sydney, Australia. Seattle doesn't seem to have brick and double-brick homes (both full brick and veneer) while this is pretty standard for Sydney.

Is there a reason for this? And can this be generalised to the entire USA?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-12-2009, 05:36 AM
 
252 posts, read 388,278 times
Reputation: 137
It might be due to the fact that we are in earthquake territory or that the area is a great source for lumber. From what I read, Sydney has small earthquakes but not usually the big rockers.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 06:19 AM
 
40 posts, read 65,629 times
Reputation: 16
Thanks for the reply. Sydney doesnt get any earthquakes at all. I do recall an aftershock from a tiny earthquake in Newcastle but that didnt even wake me up I recall - nothing compared to somewhere like Tokyo.

Only real natural disaster Sydney deals with are bushfires.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 08:09 AM
 
8 posts, read 17,097 times
Reputation: 13
Earthquakes and brick construction don't mix.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 09:07 AM
 
2,353 posts, read 536,994 times
Reputation: 538
As a former owner of an old real brick house, I can tell the horror of going through an earthquake in one. And in Seattle, getting earthquake Insurance on a brick house is very expensive. I have since sold that house, but in 1995 they wanted 800.00 to insure a 1700 Sq Foot home.

That's 800.00 Per Month
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 09:14 AM
 
40 posts, read 65,629 times
Reputation: 16
Wow crazy money! I didnt realise Seattle suffered from quakes. Are woodend houses safer during an earthquake or they are just less expensive to rebuild?

Thanks for the replies all.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 09:29 AM
 
191 posts, read 313,890 times
Reputation: 214
Wood houses can "flex" during an earthquake, and are therefore less likely to have a catastrophic structural failure than a block/brick home.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 10:56 AM
 
2,353 posts, read 536,994 times
Reputation: 538
Sticks are the way to go...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 11:19 AM
 
191 posts, read 313,890 times
Reputation: 214
Unless there is a big bad wolf chasing you, then I suggest brick.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-12-2009, 12:54 PM
 
Location: US Empire, Pac NW
5,012 posts, read 6,247,226 times
Reputation: 4125
In terms of generalizing the whole USA not having a lot of brick homes, I can tell you from experience the older homes (made in the 1940s and before) are mostly brick. I grew up in two homes on the south side of Chicago, and both were brick. Most of the houses in the neighborhoods I grew up in were brick. Same can be said for Purdue University - most buildings are red brick (including the new ones, to preserve continuity and people just like the look of them). In St. Louis, the majority of homes had some brick at least, and the old French quarter and downtown were made of brick. Suburbs were 1/2 and 1/2. I know Indianapolis, NYC, Philly, and Boston have tons of brick homes. Near Orlando is mostly stucco and concrete. Phoenix has mostly stucco and a sturdy drywall (to release the heat).

Here in Seattle, much of the older homes are brick homes too. Drive around Capitol Hill and Pioneer square / int'l district, and near UW to see what I mean. However, Seattle is a newer city and most of the population comes from transplants from the 1960s onwards to this day, so the population boom forced developers to make homes quickly, and brick supplies are more limited here.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Washington > Seattle area
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top