U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Self-Sufficiency and Preparedness
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-03-2013, 10:17 AM
 
24,852 posts, read 28,760,742 times
Reputation: 11359

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bailenforcer View Post
We have water at about 4 feet on average here and there is no swamp.

LOL Did I mention I am on Lake Michigan
Near rivers and lakes can be some of the most difficult areas to get water.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-03-2013, 10:22 AM
 
24,852 posts, read 28,760,742 times
Reputation: 11359
I drill both rock and screened wells.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-03-2013, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Interior AK
4,729 posts, read 7,805,400 times
Reputation: 3314
Quote:
Originally Posted by Driller1 View Post
Near rivers and lakes can be some of the most difficult areas to get water.
Yep, a well in a active watershed at shore is a totally different game than "sticking a straw" in an static pocket of groundwater contained inland.

We're in a rivershed and our water table is very high and easy to "hit"... but not so easy to get nice, clean water. All the subsurface water is still flowing toward the river (above the permafrost & ice layer) and is either muddy/silty or full of dissolved iron from the mountains. If you can drill down below the ice layer, the first 20 feet or so is full of arsenic.

When I lived on the coast of Albemarle sound, most wells were either slightly salty from the ocean or yellow from the cypress in the swamps or silty from the rivers.
__________________
My mod posts will always be in red.
The Rules Infractions & Deletions Who's the moderator? FAQ What is a "Personal Attack" What is "Trolling" Guidelines for copyrighted material.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2014, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,640 posts, read 43,377,854 times
Reputation: 14425
Quote:
Originally Posted by bailenforcer View Post
We have water at about 4 feet on average here and there is no swamp.

LOL Did I mention I am on Lake Michigan
Many factors can influence this. People living in drought-prone regions will commonly have much deeper aquifers. As compared to drought-free regions.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2014, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 4,776,049 times
Reputation: 2369

drought-prone or not really has nothing to do with depth to the local aquifer...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-04-2014, 06:27 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,640 posts, read 43,377,854 times
Reputation: 14425
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post

drought-prone or not really has nothing to do with depth to the local aquifer...
Abundance of aquifers is totally related to consistency of precipitation.

If you go 4 months without rain, you can not expect that your shallow aquifers to be flowing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2014, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
2,707 posts, read 4,776,049 times
Reputation: 2369
And yet the semi-arid Sandhills of Nebraska are over one of the largest aquifers in the world… In some places it's so close to the surface that it's a marsh/lake.


I've noticed "drought" is a drum you like to beat, but I don't think you actually understand what it is, and what it isn't.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-05-2014, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
27,640 posts, read 43,377,854 times
Reputation: 14425
Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
And yet the semi-arid Sandhills of Nebraska are over one of the largest aquifers in the world… In some places it's so close to the surface that it's a marsh/lake.


I've noticed "drought" is a drum you like to beat, but I don't think you actually understand what it is, and what it isn't.
Yet in 2012, "A Record Lack of Rain in Drought-Stricken Nebraska"
A Record Lack of Rain in Drought-Stricken Nebraska | Climate Central

In 2013, "70% of Nebraska now in considerable drought"
70% of Nebraska now in considerable drought - Omaha.com: News

In 2014, "Droughts are the rule, rather than the exception in Nebraska"
Droughts are the rule, rather than the exception in Nebraska : Lincoln, NE Journal Star



Okay so explain how no precipitation is such a wonderful thing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Self-Sufficiency and Preparedness
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top