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Old 03-16-2011, 06:49 PM
 
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Nighteyes, I have no idea how most people would survive 1 year of winter, a whole solid year of temps so cold crops can't grow.

I bet 95% of homes will be useless inside of 6 months as no one is gonna sit around and make electricty all the live long day.

How the hell can 'we' as a society and on a global basis provide foods in winters? The first year the entire northern hemisphere would suffer winter for that year. It's likely the 2nd year both north and south hemispheres will suffer winter at the same time.

The damnned feds ain't gonna sweat it out about who eats what when ya know? They will be in well stocked bunkers naturally, but would you even wanna be around to greet the blue bellies when they peek back out? (Note blue bellies is from lack of sun light, nothing from 1860/1865) Sorta like the English are today ya know? All peaked and pasty lookin.... ewwwww
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Old 03-16-2011, 07:00 PM
 
Location: The Woods
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Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
Arctic, I am not so sure the Nor' East would be safe from a 5 year long winter. Maybe 'we' could still make maple sugar year round, but that would be about it. Just one full year of winter would end most crops. That would kill wild game as well as any domestic stock.

It might bring on the next ice age too. Atleast it would shut up the man made global warmists.
Mac, you're right that in the worst case scenario, survival would be difficult. But we would escape the initial blast and ash fall that would be deadly and destructive...

There is some precedent for a year of winter. 1816, the Year Without a Summer. It was a tough year for people in the North...
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Old 03-16-2011, 09:56 PM
 
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Nah I'm in north Alabama, and while my family is a little further south it is more further west also so I don't know if that's a good tradeoff.

My thoughts are initially you have to survive the ash cloud. Now there will be looters and bandits roaming about too, but with a decent sized group of trusted people and a somewhat to well fortified structure one could hold them off until the ash kills or weakens them. Sealing up a house ash wouldn't be so bad from what I've seen, but the aftermath would leave a lot stuck on your shoes and being tracked in until the rain takes care of it so you'd need some type of airlock with running water in it to hose the ash off I think. Then you also have the massive influx of survivors heading for the place the media says will survive the ash cloud relatively intact. It just conjures up memories of all the people trying to camp out in Canada in World War Z.

Now at this point you've survived the ash. It seems like it'd be time to start trying to rebuild. You'd want to have enough seeds to try to grow a crop if the chance presented itself without worrying about wasting your whole supply. Similarly in this interim period the smarter bandits and more desperate survivors are going to be a big cause of trouble since there's nothing around to deal with them except other people. I can see that going for 3-5 years, but hopefully closer to three. If you really want to step up you could have undergound greenhouses and perhaps some stables so as to keep livestock. Massive cost and a high risk of failure, but if you succeed you'd have a valuable resource and if you fail you can still eat them.

Anyways what I'm getting at is that between that structure and stored food for enough people to be able to hold out against bandits you're going to need a lot of money.

Yes things would be bad in the rest of the world, but at least some societies will probably hold out without collapsing. As long as I head east fairly quickly I could probably circle the world without it catching me, and that's a plan that doesn't take a massive amount of money (which I don't have) and a trusted group of compadres (since I could never convince enough of my family that this is a realistic threat).
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Old 03-17-2011, 01:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Mac, you're right that in the worst case scenario, survival would be difficult. But we would escape the initial blast and ash fall that would be deadly and destructive...

There is some precedent for a year of winter. 1816, the Year Without a Summer. It was a tough year for people in the North...

There have been other years of all winter as well, before your date apx 100 years and again before that.

I saw a wood cut print of ice boats large enough to haul frieght up the Hudson and on to the Mohawk circa 1700, and those were cold and harsh years, in summer too, but there was a growing season.

Yeah YS can blow a top knott and we won't be in the blast or in the direct ashfall, but we will be impacted just the same and so will england, the rest of EURO and Russia....

I can last the first probably. I can heat this place with wood, and keep the building alive. I have or will have food from harvest to harvest so long as the cork don't pop before harvest.

As you know I got a few tricks up my sleeve too. I have mastered seclusion even, and like it, but I am not sure i can deal with say 5 million people dying at near the same time. That might be enough to drive anyone mad, except for wanna be dictators.

Dunno what I'ld do on a YS event with all hell bustin loose.

I coud volunteer re-populating earth , but I'ld be in big trouble when the gals figured out my wings is clipped.. LOL
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Old 03-19-2011, 12:23 AM
 
29,990 posts, read 20,712,711 times
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Sudden global cooling from major volcanic eruptions has happened before so there is no reason to believe it would not happen again.

Anyone else read the book on the 1883 eruption of Krakatau? The global cooling effect from that eruption lasted for decades. If I understand correctly a major eruption at Yellowstone would dwarf those effects significantly.

Thankfully, there is no reason to believe that Yellowstone will blow her caldera anytime soon.
Yellowstone Recent Status Report, Updates, and Information Releases
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Old 03-20-2011, 09:53 AM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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Exactly the type of disaster I DON'T want to survive.

How would you seal a house from ash? Do you have some kind of air filters in your house?
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Old 03-21-2011, 03:52 PM
 
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Anyone in the world that survived YS, would just do it out of luck...... mixed with a lot of misery. beating misery would be a big part of surviving YS as well. I am not sure i can suffer that long.
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Old 03-22-2011, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Indianapolis
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Hi everyone, interesting discussion. I wrote a book about a teen trying to survive and find his family in the wake of the eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano. It's fiction, thank goodness, but I spent 9 months researching and reading, trying to make the story realistic. I'm going to put a page on my site today with volcano preparedness links and a list of non-fiction on supervolcanoes and volcanic winter. Moderator cut: self promotion is not allowed --Mike

Last edited by MissingAll4Seasons; 03-22-2011 at 03:16 PM.. Reason: removed site link and book title
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Old 03-22-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Staten Island, New York
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Originally Posted by Mike Mullin View Post
Hi everyone, interesting discussion. I wrote a book about a teen trying to survive and find his family in the wake of the eruption of the Yellowstone supervolcano. It's fiction, thank goodness, but I spent 9 months researching and reading, trying to make the story realistic. I'm going to put a page on my site today with volcano preparedness links and a list of non-fiction on supervolcanoes and volcanic winter. Moderator cut: self promotion is not allowed --Mike
COOL! I look forward to buying and reading it!

Last edited by MissingAll4Seasons; 03-22-2011 at 03:10 PM..
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Old 03-22-2011, 01:58 PM
 
Location: FROM Dixie, but IN SoCal
3,189 posts, read 2,438,379 times
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Originally Posted by NYChistorygal View Post
COOL! I look forward to buying and reading it!
Perhaps one should also research and read the works on nuclear winter, as the mechanisms behind both phenomena, and the phenomena themselves, are virtually identical. Other readings worth the effort concern the global climate/weather changes following the Krakatoa eruption in 1883, and the Tunguska event in 1908. Even more recent readings concern the global weather effects of the Mount St. Helens eruption in 1980.

Ya see, folks, there is (almost) nothing new under the sun. Practically everything has happened before. And, as Spengler's famous saying goes, "Those who refuse to learn from history are doomed to repeat it."

Just some food for thought.

-- Nighteyes

PS: By now it should come as no surprise that my chief concern has to do with Mother Earth, NOT with any human issues such as political, economic or military acts. Compared to Mother Earth, and with the exception of thermonuclear war, we humans exert very little immediate influence. Our cumulative influence over time, however, does have a progressively detrimental effect...

- NE

Last edited by Nighteyes; 03-22-2011 at 02:10 PM..
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