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Old 11-09-2011, 05:57 AM
 
Location: Tejas
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Default If you buy honey at your grocery store, you need to know this

Tests Show Most Store Honey Isn't Honey

Figures...
OD
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Old 11-09-2011, 06:30 AM
 
Location: Nawth Carolina
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Wow..very interesting indeed. Thanks for posting.
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Old 11-09-2011, 06:50 AM
 
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That is interesting, and I would have had no idea. makes me feel better that I buy honey from local bee keepers at farmer's markets. I hope I can continue that method of buying.
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:43 AM
 
Location: Murphy, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mac_Muz View Post
That is interesting, and I would have had no idea. makes me feel better that I buy honey from local bee keepers at farmer's markets. I hope I can continue that method of buying.
Why wouldn't u keep that method. Are grocery stores much cheaper?
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Old 11-09-2011, 08:51 AM
 
Location: Pasadena, CA
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And yet, I see Honey at the top of another list (can't remember) of things NOT to buy from a farmer's market and stick with grocery stores instead..
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Old 11-09-2011, 09:04 AM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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Luckily, even in our grocery store, honey from a local beekeeper is available in this area.
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Old 11-09-2011, 09:07 AM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Raw, unpasteurized, unfiltered locally grown honey is the only kind I use.

20yrsinBranson
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Old 11-09-2011, 10:58 AM
 
Location: Tejas
1,816 posts, read 1,575,726 times
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Default Broken system

The honey story illustrates that you just cannot regulate everything. People have just become corrupt on a grand scale and they find it easier to cut corners without telling you and still make huge profits...

Local honey is everything you should buy (if you can afford it, honey in this country is like gold). My parents send me mine from Eastern Europe in 20 lb buckets, they know a guy who has bees up in the mountain forests and pastures, untouched nature... The only downside is I don't get exposed to local pollen - something that's pretty important when you are buying local honey. They also send me ironwort tea (if you have not tried it, look it up under Greek mountain tea or Macedonian mountain tea), it is collected in the mountainous regions of the Balkan peninsula and smells ssssoooooo goooood . It also sells for a few cents a bunch there. Here if you want to buy good tea you pay through your nose, cheap industrial junk you get at the grocery store has nothing worth in it.

I wish everything could just be local and cheap as it used to be

<end of rant, sorry>

OD
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Old 11-09-2011, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ragnarkar View Post
And yet, I see Honey at the top of another list (can't remember) of things NOT to buy from a farmer's market and stick with grocery stores instead..
The reason people are advised to buy honey in grocery stores instead of from local producers is that the raw unpasteurized honey can have botulism that can make you sick or even has been documented to kill babies.

[LEFT]"Botulism spores are in air, soil, water and plants. In the absence of oxygen, the spores germinate and produce toxins. The process of boiling destroys the bacterial spores and toxins. Raw honey is a potential source of the Clostridium botulinum spores. The Centers for Disease Control, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Honey Board recommend that you not give honey to infants under the age of 12 months. Infant botulism is a rare disease caused by the bacteria, Clostridium botulinum. The disease causes varying degrees of paralysis. Children over age 1 and healthy adults have the mature digestive systems necessary to prevent botulism spores from thriving."
Read more: The Dangers And Benefits Of Raw Honey | LIVESTRONG.COM
[/LEFT]


The truth of it is that pasteurizing honey removes the very antibiotic properties - even anti-allergy properties! - that raw honey provides. Think of it - the bees go to the very pollen-producing plants to which you are allergic, and make their honey from the sweetness of those flowers.

Many local producers of honey do not filter their honey nor pasteurize it. To do so is not only expensive and time-consuming, but removes all of the 'good stuff' for which people buy the local honey. It also can alter the taste and can expose it to humidity, which can cause honey to change to sugar more quickly.

Most folks who have been raised to believe that the more processing their food receives, the better, and also believe that unpasteurized honey, like unpasteurized milk, is 'unsafe at any speed'. They don't understand that if all of the nutrients are removed, then all they have is empty calories.
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Old 11-09-2011, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Alaska
2,035 posts, read 1,190,291 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
The reason people are advised to buy honey in grocery stores instead of from local producers is that the raw unpasteurized honey can have botulism that can make you sick or even has been documented to kill babies.

"Botulism spores are in air, soil, water and plants. In the absence of oxygen, the spores germinate and produce toxins. The process of boiling destroys the bacterial spores and toxins. Raw honey is a potential source of the Clostridium botulinum spores. The Centers for Disease Control, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the National Honey Board recommend that you not give honey to infants under the age of 12 months. Infant botulism is a rare disease caused by the bacteria, Clostridium botulinum. The disease causes varying degrees of paralysis. Children over age 1 and healthy adults have the mature digestive systems necessary to prevent botulism spores from thriving."
Read more: The Dangers And Benefits Of Raw Honey | LIVESTRONG.COM


The truth of it is that pasteurizing honey removes the very antibiotic properties - even anti-allergy properties! - that raw honey provides. Think of it - the bees go to the very pollen-producing plants to which you are allergic, and make their honey from the sweetness of those flowers.

Many local producers of honey do not filter their honey nor pasteurize it. To do so is not only expensive and time-consuming, but removes all of the 'good stuff' for which people buy the local honey. It also can alter the taste and can expose it to humidity, which can cause honey to change to sugar more quickly.

Most folks who have been raised to believe that the more processing their food receives, the better, and also believe that unpasteurized honey, like unpasteurized milk, is 'unsafe at any speed'. They don't understand that if all of the nutrients are removed, then all they have is empty calories.
Erm hold on a sec... Botulin spores require a minimum sustained temperature of over 250F for 3 minutes for a kill (FDA Canning 101 pressure can at 250F for 30 minutes so the entire contents are at 250F for at least 3 minutes). So how does pasteurization (lower temperature for less time) work then...? any heat treatment of less than 250F for 3 minutes is not guaranteed to do anything, IIRC you could "kill" botulin spores in a waterbath canner, it would just take 7-9 hours of processing at 212F. If pasteurization is done on honey like say milk (162F) how long would it need to be at that temperature? Since heat destruction of micro-organisms is exponential as you increase heat, then that 7-9 hours might well become 70-90 hours, or 700-900 hours, or be completely ineffective as the bacterial growth rate is higher than the kill rate of the increased temperature.

Pasteurization is not a rational mechanism to remove the risk of botulism and it seems like hokey science to me. Especially as infants under 1 year have lower acid in their digestive systems (which botulin spores are susceptable to), and pretty much everything you have at home will have the botulism bacteria on it (it's soil endemic). Sure there's a risk of infecting an infant with C. botulinum giving it honey, or fresh produce, or canned produce, or if it just puts something in its mouth off the floor (or worse) e.g. a pacifier; it's not like 1 year olds ever do such things is it...?

Personally I couldn't give a cr*p, gimme the honey with the bee's legs in it.
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