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Old 11-20-2011, 01:27 PM
 
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For those who are handy, please help us start a thread list. Thanks!


Tools every prepper should have. SHTF Preps and survival supplies. - YouTube

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fk93F...watch_response
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Old 11-20-2011, 01:32 PM
 
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Also, if anybody knows a good place to buy good (preferably old fashioned) hand tools, please recommend.
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Old 11-20-2011, 02:22 PM
 
Location: GOVERNMENT of TRAITORS & NAZIS
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Along the same lines, how about a source for a set of interchangeable heads for one handle? A sledge, axe, wedge, shovel, etc..
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Old 11-20-2011, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Reality
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RememberMee View Post
Also, if anybody knows a good place to buy good (preferably old fashioned) hand tools, please recommend.
Craigslist is my first choice hands down, look for people holding estate sales or just large tool sales in general. I've purchased tons of old hand tools for dirt cheap on CL. You really just have to shop with cash in hand and prepare to do some looking but it's shocking what I've found.

Sledge hammers, yard picks, adjustable wrenches, etc for $2 - $5 each. I've bought so many that I've started to clean them up and trade them to friends for other tools.
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Old 11-20-2011, 03:47 PM
 
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Flea markets, swap meets, garage sales etc.... Print out a list of what you want first and the retail costs so you can be ready to deal when you see something you want.


A good mechanics tool set with both metric and standard sizes. Craftsman make some good sets that are always going on sale.
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Old 11-20-2011, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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A machete. Ours is invaluable; not just for clearing brush from around fenceposts that we are replacing, but skinning the squaw wood from large logs for an easier cut, etc. A good sharp clean cutting blade always goes with us on the property.

A Leatherman. This mighty midget is something we have used in the Fire Department for YEARS, and it just keeps getting better. Innocuously sheathed inside are a screwdriver, several cutting edges, scizzors, can/bottle opener, mini-pliers, etc. Better and more versatile than a swiss army knife, it folds compactly into a pouch that slides onto DH's belt and is never far from his hand.

The video said 'sledge' but a 'baby sledge' is easier to carry and more compact than shown. Still has power to break a lock, and can be used by even children or a small female.

A "fence puller" aka a "come-along" - handy and very convenient for making things tight that need to be, or hooking them to your bumper, or...

Fence pliers - these do double-duty to not only twist heavy wires and make sure that they stay twisted, but snip them. It also doubles as a hammer.

The most convenient shovel for a 'bug-out bag' is an Army collapsible shovel. This also folds to a carry-size for a pick-up tool box or can even go behind a seat or in with your spare tire; even be strapped to a backpack frame. It is a little hard to get used to, but is invaluable for digging out in snow or mud... or the middle "s" of the three "s's".
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Old 11-20-2011, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Between Seattle and Portland
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Great idea for a thread!

My late FIL was a woodshop teacher, so I'm pretty familiar with the hand tools he used regularly. I was curious, however, how a woodworking website would define "essential hand tools" and found this list. (I need to look up some of the items that I've never heard of -- I'm almost afraid to ask what "offset dykes" are.)

Tape measure
utility knife
hammer
5 in 1 painting tool with thick blade
6" flat prybar
Empire "speed square" , modified
chalkline
nailsets
awl
multi-tip screwdriver
offset dykes, Klein alloy steel high leverage with blue handles
small slip joint pliers
4 in hand file

combination square
framing square plus stair nuts
chisels (rough and finish)
wood saw(s)
hacksaw with various blades in handle tube
tinsnips
squeeze stapler and loads
block plane
smooth plane
16" flat bar
second hammer, different weight head
a few more files
medium and large slotted screwdrivers
10" adjustable wrench
7" Vise-Grips, curved jaws
end nippers
Channellocks, 12"
2 spring clamps
2 quick acting light pattern bar clamps
torpedo and 2' levels (longer ones won't fit in the box)

http://forums.finehomebuilding.com/b...very-carpenter
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Old 11-20-2011, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Reality
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stonecypher5413 View Post
Great idea for a thread!

My late FIL was a woodshop teacher, so I'm pretty familiar with the hand tools he used regularly. I was curious, however, how a woodworking website would define "essential hand tools" and found this list. (I need to look up some of the items that I've never heard of -- I'm almost afraid to ask what "offset dykes" are.)
Offset dykes are electrician linemen pliers or offset wire cutters. The cutting blades are offset to one side of the tool, if you ever hire an electrician and he shows up without a pair of these in his belt or tool bag/box send him away.

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Old 11-20-2011, 11:04 PM
 
Location: FROM Dixie, but IN SoCal
3,491 posts, read 5,239,898 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SCGranny View Post
A machete. Ours is invaluable; not just for clearing brush from around fenceposts that we are replacing, but skinning the squaw wood from large logs for an easier cut, etc. A good sharp clean cutting blade always goes with us on the property.
One caveat to those who haven't learned the use of a machete -- it must be kept extremely sharp or it becomes more of a danger than a help. Machete blades are essentially made of spring steel. A dull machete will "bounce" -- frequently into "softer" things that don't require as sharp a blade to cut, such as a leg. Also, if the user's hand is all sweaty, or tired, they have a distressing tendency to go flying in an unexpected and unpredictable manner.

Back in the late 40's and 50's, Scott Paper Company equipped its foresters with machetes. They stopped this in the early 60's because of all the serious machete-caused injuries. And that was among a cadre of trained and experienced people.

I'm not saying don't use one. I'm saying keep it sharp, and keep yourself sharp while using it. Get an "old pro" to show you the secrets of machete use (and there are a lot of them).

Regards,

-- Nighteyes (who learned from one of the best)
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Old 11-20-2011, 11:29 PM
 
4,135 posts, read 9,055,020 times
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Flea market tools are often abused tools. You need to know what is or is not. Get someone who knows what is to teach you before you buy them

If you are sharpening anything, you really should have some honing oil. Also the proper tool to set the teeth on a hand saw. Add to that a file cleaner. You can have the tools, but if they aren't sharp or in proper working order, then it is agony to use.

Also, for every person who uses a hammer: please make sure it hasn't been "cauliflowered": this is when some fool smashed it onto a hard surface and the head has broken or smashed so that the face of the head looks like a caulifower floret. If it is like that, toss it.

Safety glasses.

Extra handles for axes and hammers and the wood shims to fit them.

steel wool. (plain) -- to use on tool for cleaning ( you want no rust) and a light oil to keep them unrusted.

Sandpaper. If you cut wood and it is rough, you may just need it.

Screws, bolts and nails. Assorted sizes.

a few C-clamps ( 2-4 of each size)

vise and anvil ( or a piece of I-beam for an anvil)
------------------------------------------------

This is a "go on forever" list. What I do know is if a hand tool is cared for well, it won't wear out. We have my husband's entire shop I could list; plus tools his Dad had ( a pipe cutter for the threads and inside -- not sure what the entire rig is called -- cuts all pipe4 and threads inside and out threads and huge plumber's pipe wrenches) and also his grandfathers.
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