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Old 11-01-2012, 08:16 PM
 
60 posts, read 152,734 times
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They had a few days to prepare for this, but it seems like a lot of people weren't taking the forecast seriously until the very last minute. Say Hurricane Sandy were to hit the area where you live and you have a few days warning. Would you pack up your car and leave the area entirely? Go out and buy supplies and bunker down at home? What supplies would you buy? What other preparations would you make?
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:50 PM
 
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From a little experience down here in Southeast Louisiana, I'll say u can never prepare enough for these storms. if ur evacuating or not I say.
always have all ur paperwork handy in an easy to carry briefcase, plenty of gasoline an some extra 5 gallon cans full, ice chests full of ice and water, a few 1,000 dollars cash, with plenty of small bills, ur glock full to the top, with a few extra magazines, extra ammo, along with a 12 gauge shotgun w/extra ammo, flashlites/batteries dry foods that are easy to eat with little to no preparation drinkin water. a freakin case of bug spray, a generator with a small window unit/box fan. This is the tip of the iceburg but u get the idea...
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Old 11-01-2012, 08:58 PM
 
Location: Western Nebraskansas
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I live on the Great Plains. Of all the natural disasters, we're at least safe from hurricanes... I'm also fairly high in a well-drained area, so flooding of any sort is pretty unlikely. Evacuation would never happen, except in a very short-notice sort of way, if prairie fire were on my doorstep.
Consequently, anything I plan for is a hunker down type of scenario. And really, that's just life. Our pantry is ALWAYS well stocked. I would like a bigger generator, though...
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Old 11-01-2012, 09:04 PM
 
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I'll try to retire in an area like u live in, hell I'll never be able to afford homeowners insurance when my retirement days come anyway
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Old 11-01-2012, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Texas
15,638 posts, read 14,695,160 times
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I keep a lot of battery operated devices around just for tornado alerts. Things like lanterns, weather radio, fans, etc. I also keep an outlandish amount of batteries stashed in the one safe room in the house.

I keep lots of food and water and gasoline. Plus I make sure always to have a lot of pet food for the pets.

It is very important to have cash, important papers and meds in a place that is easy and fast to get to.
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Old 11-01-2012, 10:35 PM
 
Location: Where they serve real ale.
7,249 posts, read 6,411,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
I live on the Great Plains. Of all the natural disasters, we're at least safe from hurricanes... I'm also fairly high in a well-drained area, so flooding of any sort is pretty unlikely. Evacuation would never happen, except in a very short-notice sort of way, if prairie fire were on my doorstep.
Consequently, anything I plan for is a hunker down type of scenario. And really, that's just life. Our pantry is ALWAYS well stocked. I would like a bigger generator, though...
It hard to hunker down in place when a tornado takes the roof off of your house and you live in a place with a lot of tornadoes. Since that is the most likely major disaster to hit the mid west what would you do in such an event?
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Old 11-01-2012, 10:43 PM
 
Location: Northern CA
12,775 posts, read 9,441,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ketabcha View Post
I keep a lot of battery operated devices around just for tornado alerts. Things like lanterns, weather radio, fans, etc. I also keep an outlandish amount of batteries stashed in the one safe room in the house.

I keep lots of food and water and gasoline. Plus I make sure always to have a lot of pet food for the pets.

It is very important to have cash, important papers and meds in a place that is easy and fast to get to.
I've been wanting to store about 80 lb.s of kibble, but not sure what's the best way to store it. My plan was to use a garbage can with lid sealed with duct tape - but mold might set in. Got any ideas?
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Old 11-01-2012, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Prepperland
13,117 posts, read 9,205,456 times
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Ideally, the preparation for disaster should have occurred generations ago, by encouraging construction of disaster resistant structures and infrastructure. Since that hasn't happened, nor does it look like it ever will, one is left with the less appealing option to make do with what is available.
There are innumerable "prepper" lists and guidelines, for "bug out bags" and "bug in locations" and so on.

What long term preparations could coastal areas make?
We know that levees are not the solution. Not only are they eyesores, and blights to the environment, one breach, there goes the protection. Or if the water level overtops it, again, it is useless. There is always "the next one" that is bigger than expected.
However, why not incorporate the levee into the design of communities and villages? Build circular "gated communities" - dual ring structures, that presented a barrier wall to the elements, no one breach would impact all villages.

What is a dual ring village? Imagine a long line of store fronts, with apartments above, wrapped into a ring. Repeat the process inside the outer ring, creating two rings, a central park, and a circular "main street". Make the exterior wall into a storm barrier (2 m rammed earth?) with only a gateway.

A five story (50 ft) high ring wall village would have been effectively immune to the storm surge, floods, and other storm related factors from Hurricane Sandy.

{Lighthouses have used cylindrical wall construction for centuries, and have a history of disaster resistance.}

Yahoo! Groups
Quote:
[] Flood protection - assuming that the DRV is built with very thick exterior
barrier walls (2 meters), 5 stories high (15 meters) and have a watertight
double gateway. In the event of a future levee breach, each DRV would become an
island of safety... a double island (two rings).
[] Wind protection - barrier walls reduce risk from flying debris. The curved
wall spills wind, too.
[] Vermin protection - by not using wood in construction.
[] Fire protection - non-flammable construction materials reduce risk from fire.
[] Earthquake protection - cylindrical walls are resistant to side forces - and
storm surges.
[] Climate extremes - the DRV reduces the surface area exposed to climate
extremes and maintains comfort with less fuel / energy.
Chinese Hakka Tulou represent a similar functional design:
Clan homes in Fujian
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Old 11-02-2012, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Cody, WY
9,187 posts, read 10,136,018 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by claudhopper View Post
I've been wanting to store about 80 lb.s of kibble, but not sure what's the best way to store it. My plan was to use a garbage can with lid sealed with duct tape - but mold might set in. Got any ideas?
The oil goes rancid within just a few months. If you're rotating and using that much within three months or so you'd be OK but no longer. You need to store it in food safe containers as well. If you're planning to store for longer than that you need to store canned food.
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Old 11-02-2012, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Northern CA
12,775 posts, read 9,441,453 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in Wyoming View Post
The oil goes rancid within just a few months. If you're rotating and using that much within three months or so you'd be OK but no longer. You need to store it in food safe containers as well. If you're planning to store for longer than that you need to store canned food.
Ah, never thought of oil going rancid. I'll have to come up with another plan. We go thru a 40lb bag about every 2-3 weeks, so I wanted to put some away for safe keeping. I'll look into the food safe containers, thanks.
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