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Old 02-22-2008, 03:54 AM
 
Location: New York
2,003 posts, read 4,442,969 times
Reputation: 1995

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When I used to work with the public it was clearly obvious that some Americans were nasty spoiled brats. I have not worked with the public in years and I have to confess that I do not like people much anymore after my extensive experiences at various positions.

The problem with Americans is that they expect everything and are completely unrealistic in their demands. We have new money barely middle class people thinking they are upper class land barons. Very few of these people have had to struggle and work at a retail type position. They treat these workers like trash and lowly servants. Too much money and not enough class. Most never had to work a hourly job so without that point of reference that treat the help like dirt, in all of the stores, restaurants and airlines they patronize.

Where I live they can not get Americans to work retail anymore. Almost all of the employees are imported illegal aliens from Latin America. These people that are allowed to come here for cheap labor are going to rise up one day. It is dangerous that we have to import a underclass to do things like pour a coffee or make a sandwich Young Americans should be working these jobs gaining vital experience and not people from the third world. This underclass will not remain subservient for much longer, I am sure they are abused everyday in their jobs and hate Americans with a passion.

The worst offenders are those from Long Island New York and the Los Angeles area. These people have the greatest potential to be downright nasty and spoiled.
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Old 02-23-2008, 11:45 PM
 
6,351 posts, read 19,520,674 times
Reputation: 9926
Quote:
Originally Posted by nativeDallasite View Post
I try to compliment outstanding service too; Macy's makes it really easy by offering a form on their website. I also once wrote a letter to American Airlines to compliment them on their ground staff and flight crew on a particular flight I took. I never heard anything in response, but hopefully the letters I wrote made it into the employees' personnel files. Outstanding service deserves to be recognized.
AMEN...hat's one of my pet peeves!!! If a customer is going to take time to offer their opinion of your business, the least you could do is acknowledge it! I also hate it when the corporate entity sends a response to me but the word never gets back to the employee that provided me good service...
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Old 02-24-2008, 01:18 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,575,458 times
Reputation: 2127
I currently work in retail,my job pays good compared to alot of jobs in the area,but I am willing to take a pay cut and get a different job.I dont want to do retail anymore.

I believe in the old saying,treat people the way you want to be treated,so when a customer is nice I am nice and very helpful,but when someone is rude ,I will treat them the sameway, and I am surprised at how rude some people can be,they must have been raised in a barn.I wonder if their parents ever taught them manners.
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Old 02-24-2008, 08:27 AM
 
3,763 posts, read 10,821,544 times
Reputation: 6744
It goes both ways - I worked at WalMart as a Cashier, and as a floor-worker in stationary during the dreaded back-to-school rush. For years after that, I was more sympathetic to retail workers than you could imagine. I would in fact run back to departments to get a second item if I *gasp* grabbed one without a pricetag/barcode - because I knew I could do it faster than a price check.

HOWEVER. For a lot of workers in today's retail landscape I see a distinct amount of "I HATE MY JOB AND I AM NOT GOING TO WORK HARD BECAUSE OF IT".

It is not my problem that you hate your job, and while I will always be polite, I will be less and less understanding if your incompetence and your obvious disdain for having to work effect my customer experience.

I too hated my job when I worked for WalMart for $6.50 an hour. It was tiring, the custoemrs were rude, but I BUSTED my you-know-what to keep the line moving, to quickly solve problems, to hand disgruntled customers over to management. I never was rude to customers (NEVER) - and I was always extremely apologetic if someone had to wait in my line more than 5 mintues.

So when I am in a store today, and the salesperson is literally moving so slow it seems as though they've been filmed in slow motion, and in addition to that - they have no idea how to do something simple (like use a coupon, or an employee discount) - I will be FROSTILY Polite, but I will not be sympathetic unless there is a clear reason (some sort of disability) why they are so slow and borderline incompetent.
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Old 02-24-2008, 11:12 AM
 
16,641 posts, read 21,295,374 times
Reputation: 48312
Before getting into construction, I worked sacking groceries, washing dishes,and stocking shelves after graduating from high school. One day as I was scrubbing pots one day, one of the waitresses walked to the back of the kitchen, and was crying. Could not stop. She took garbage from two guys who not only stiffed her on the tip but also walked out without paying. We could not catch the guys as it was right in the middle of the lunch rush. I'll never forget what the head chef said after consoling her. "People who don't have respect for other people don't have much respect for themselves".
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Old 02-24-2008, 03:07 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,264 posts, read 18,715,719 times
Reputation: 17856
And, he was right. What a bunch of creeps.
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People may not recall what you said to them, but they will always remember how you made them feel .
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Old 02-27-2008, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Polish Hill, Pittsburgh, PA
30,579 posts, read 68,119,809 times
Reputation: 16267
Quote:
Originally Posted by Briolat21 View Post
So when I am in a store today, and the salesperson is literally moving so slow it seems as though they've been filmed in slow motion, and in addition to that - they have no idea how to do something simple (like use a coupon, or an employee discount) - I will be FROSTILY Polite, but I will not be sympathetic unless there is a clear reason (some sort of disability) why they are so slow and borderline incompetent.
With all due respect though when you work in a very large (200,000+ square foot store) with multiple departments, it can be quite difficult to tend to the specialized needs of every customer. I'm a seasonal sales specialist (grills, lawn tractors, patio furniture, etc.) for Lowe's Home Improvement here in the New York City exurbs, and the other night I was en route to the lumber department to grab a large metal loading cart for another customer when I walked by an aisle in the flooring department and noticed a couple looking rather irate. I stopped to greet them and ask them if I could assist them. He said "I'm guessing YOU'RE not the flooring guy either?" I said "No sir, but I'll get someone for you," as I whipped out my Spectra-Link phone to dial the department's extension. He put his hands up in the air, said "Don't even bother. I've been waiting around for you people to help me for 15 minutes, and I'm tired of waiting!" Irked, I just walked away and found the flooring salesperson riding the floor-cleaning zamboni around the store nearby. I took her over to the department, where the man who was hot-headed with me was now calmed down and pleasant when the woman greeted him. I think he realized that she was the only person in that department at the time and was being forced to clean the floor's due to our store's severe understaffing issues, hence why she wasn't around to greet him earlier. Needless to say though I was angry the rest of the night that he hadn't bothered in the least to apologize for his brash behavior towards me.

People who walk into stores like Lowe's or Home Depot have to realize that we're not all experts in everything. I know a little about about most items we carry, but when I get stopped in my department and asked complex wiring questions, roofing questions, plumbing questions, etc., the best that I can do is try to find someone else expediently who can better address their concerns. I'm not being "lazy." I just don't feel confident in providing our customers with "bad" advice and would prefer them to be PATIENT until I can secure someone who can provide them with the PROPER knowledge to complete their projects. Would you people rather have someone with zero experience in your area of inquiry addressing your concerns or a veteran? You wouldn't go into a Wal-Mart and ask the cashier in the front of the store about tires, nor would you enter Best Buy and ask an associate there about lingerie, so why would you go into Lowe's and ask the grill guy how to install a skylight? Do people honestly lack common sense? If I were a professional in every realm known to the home improvement industry, I'd likely be earning six-figures as an independent contractor specializing in electrical work, plumbing, roofing, masonry, carpentry, landscaping, etc. I don't know much outside of my departmental specialty, hence why I only earn $9.92/hr.

So the next time you imply that someone must be "incompetent," pause to consider if they're being forced to work outside of their trained area. I'm ALWAYS polite and greet everyone with a wide, bright smile---I leave my manic depression at home. I'll agree that there's no excuse for having a sour attitude, but there's likewise NO excuse to have a cheerful attitude met with contempt, as has happened to me on a near-daily basis. I don't know if being so close to New York City means that customers here are just disproportionately impatient and irate as compared to the rest of the BosWash Corridor or what, but sometimes a retail salesperson or clerk can appear to be doing everything "right" and STILL end up wronged.
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Old 02-28-2008, 12:49 AM
 
Location: Coachella Valley, California
15,566 posts, read 36,922,766 times
Reputation: 13202
Quote:
Originally Posted by SWB View Post
With all due respect though when you work in a very large (200,000+ square foot store) with multiple departments, it can be quite difficult to tend to the specialized needs of every customer. I'm a seasonal sales specialist (grills, lawn tractors, patio furniture, etc.) for Lowe's Home Improvement here in the New York City exurbs, and the other night I was en route to the lumber department to grab a large metal loading cart for another customer when I walked by an aisle in the flooring department and noticed a couple looking rather irate. I stopped to greet them and ask them if I could assist them. He said "I'm guessing YOU'RE not the flooring guy either?" I said "No sir, but I'll get someone for you," as I whipped out my Spectra-Link phone to dial the department's extension. He put his hands up in the air, said "Don't even bother. I've been waiting around for you people to help me for 15 minutes, and I'm tired of waiting!" Irked, I just walked away and found the flooring salesperson riding the floor-cleaning zamboni around the store nearby. I took her over to the department, where the man who was hot-headed with me was now calmed down and pleasant when the woman greeted him. I think he realized that she was the only person in that department at the time and was being forced to clean the floor's due to our store's severe understaffing issues, hence why she wasn't around to greet him earlier. Needless to say though I was angry the rest of the night that he hadn't bothered in the least to apologize for his brash behavior towards me.

People who walk into stores like Lowe's or Home Depot have to realize that we're not all experts in everything. I know a little about about most items we carry, but when I get stopped in my department and asked complex wiring questions, roofing questions, plumbing questions, etc., the best that I can do is try to find someone else expediently who can better address their concerns. I'm not being "lazy." I just don't feel confident in providing our customers with "bad" advice and would prefer them to be PATIENT until I can secure someone who can provide them with the PROPER knowledge to complete their projects. Would you people rather have someone with zero experience in your area of inquiry addressing your concerns or a veteran? You wouldn't go into a Wal-Mart and ask the cashier in the front of the store about tires, nor would you enter Best Buy and ask an associate there about lingerie, so why would you go into Lowe's and ask the grill guy how to install a skylight? Do people honestly lack common sense? If I were a professional in every realm known to the home improvement industry, I'd likely be earning six-figures as an independent contractor specializing in electrical work, plumbing, roofing, masonry, carpentry, landscaping, etc. I don't know much outside of my departmental specialty, hence why I only earn $9.92/hr.

So the next time you imply that someone must be "incompetent," pause to consider if they're being forced to work outside of their trained area. I'm ALWAYS polite and greet everyone with a wide, bright smile---I leave my manic depression at home. I'll agree that there's no excuse for having a sour attitude, but there's likewise NO excuse to have a cheerful attitude met with contempt, as has happened to me on a near-daily basis. I don't know if being so close to New York City means that customers here are just disproportionately impatient and irate as compared to the rest of the BosWash Corridor or what, but sometimes a retail salesperson or clerk can appear to be doing everything "right" and STILL end up wronged.
No, rudeness isn't limited to your area. My mom worked for Lowes in California and recently just walked out. She just had enough, got to her breaking point and bailed out. I would try to tell her not to allow other people's bad moods and nasty attitudes affect the way she is going to feel. In other words, don't react to their actions. But I guess one after the other on a daily basis, along with understaffing to cut costs and poor management tends to wear a person down after a while.
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Old 11-30-2013, 02:04 AM
 
3 posts, read 4,957 times
Reputation: 10
I worked as well - in a grocery store for 9 years. It was a very, very busy store and we checked like heck, I mean we were told by management to check fast all the time. (1978-1987). Now I am a gramma of 6 and sometimes those experiences flash through my mind. I remember the kind and warm customers. I desire also to be known as a nice customer. I feel sorry for those mean-spirited people. The saying goes: Happy people aren't mean.
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Old 12-01-2013, 07:57 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,994 posts, read 46,801,338 times
Reputation: 63903
I tend to patronize stores where customer service is important, even if they might be a bit more expensive. Really, I cannot think of any store I have been to lately in which the employees were not cheerful and helpful, except for Walmart, which I only set foot in in the course of my work, but otherwise wouldn't go there.
I did notice the Walmart has some very old ladies greeting customers as they come and go. I think this is sweet and I try to always acknowledge them, since shoppers tend to blow past them.
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