U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Shopping and Consumer Products
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 06-30-2015, 12:41 PM
 
Location: Trekking Through The Hinterlands
71 posts, read 110,761 times
Reputation: 168

Advertisements

Is flagrant overcharging on prepackaged food a strategy based on John Mackey's focus on what he calls 'Conscious Capitalism'?

An investigation of Whole Foods stores in New York City uncovered "systemic" overcharging of its customers who purchased pre-packaged foods.

Just in case one thinks Whole Foods is being picked on here, the DCA Commissioner Menin is quoted as saying that “Our inspectors tell me this is the worst case of mislabeling they have seen in their careers."

A bit of history:
An investigation in California, which began in 2012, also found pricing irregularities in the state’s Whole Foods stores. City Attorneys for Santa Monica, Los Angeles, and San Diego brought a civil consumer protection case on behalf of the people of the State of California. As a result of that case, Whole Foods agreed to pay close to $800,000 in penalties and initiate a stringent in-house pricing accuracy effort that included a statewide compliance coordinator, a designated employee at each location for pricing accuracy, and random audits.

It looks like the Whole Foods cult leaders didn't bother to change their scam outside of California.

This company seems to have adopted the same 'Conscious Capitalism' approach as the TBTF banks and insurance industry by just paying the fines and continuing their shady practices.

Multiple streams of income....those that are honest and those that are just plain theft........

'Caveat emptor' clearly goes hand in hand with 'Conscious Capitalism' when entering the Cult-World of Whole Foods.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-01-2015, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
18,545 posts, read 55,469,830 times
Reputation: 32291
I'm not sure about the whole kerfuffle that New York brought on, especially in light of the outcome of the claims the state made against GNC and other vitamin suppliers and then quietly backed down. It wouldn't be the first time a watchdog agency has become a shakedown agency.

The other bit on this is that if the price is clearly marked on the package, the price per pound is somewhat irrelevant. If the scales were short or the tare not removed when a customer ordered a product, that is theft. Inaccurate weights and unequal packaging occur all the time. 3 ears of corn for $1 - sometimes the ears are larger, sometimes smaller. Cantaloupe $2 - some are huge, some small, some sweet, some rotten. I generally look at a price, heft the package, and make a decision on whether to buy or not. In some cases, I seek out a scale and re-weigh.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-01-2015, 01:31 PM
 
Location: North Texas
24,326 posts, read 33,577,660 times
Reputation: 27887
They're hardly the only store doing this, but some of their offenses are way beyond simple calibration problems IMHO.

There's a high-end supermarket chain in Texas (probably in some other states too) called HEB Central Market, where you weigh your produce/bulk items yourself and can print out a bar code to stick on the bag so the cashiers don't have to enter the codes (for faster checkout, I'm assuming).

Yeah.

One time I decided to print out the stickers but stick them on a piece of paper instead of on the bags, and left it to the cashiers to enter the codes. Every item came up lighter (and cheaper) on the register scale than on the others.

Things that make you go "DUH."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2015, 03:43 PM
 
Location: United States
464 posts, read 674,122 times
Reputation: 767
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigDGeek View Post
They're hardly the only store doing this, but some of their offenses are way beyond simple calibration problems IMHO.

There's a high-end supermarket chain in Texas (probably in some other states too) called HEB Central Market, where you weigh your produce/bulk items yourself and can print out a bar code to stick on the bag so the cashiers don't have to enter the codes (for faster checkout, I'm assuming).

Yeah.

One time I decided to print out the stickers but stick them on a piece of paper instead of on the bags, and left it to the cashiers to enter the codes. Every item came up lighter (and cheaper) on the register scale than on the others.

Things that make you go "DUH."
They're known in our household as "Central Markup."

You're helping H-E-B profit more by weighing your items on the scales, it reduces their checkout staff's IPM (items per minute) scan rate. The minimum scan rate, I'm told, is 36 items per minute. Below that and you're shown the door.

If you're a foodie living in the San Antonio metro area, it's hard to avoid Central Market as they carry many items that otherwise cannot be sourced locally. Their prices have increased ridiculously in the past year. Our family has noticed a definite decline in the quality of some of their store-made foods.

We've responded by buying far less from them, going there at most once a month where last year at this time we went once a week.

I'd love to see another supermarket chain (other than Walmart & Whole Paycheck) enter the San Antonio area and break H-E-B's stranglehold on consumers. When we moved here in the late 1990's we loved Albertson's. H-E-B (who owns Central Market) has driven out most major competitors from the San Antonio metro area.

H-E-B's strategy typifies the predominant San Antonio mindset of "Obey, Conform, Consume."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Shopping and Consumer Products
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top