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Old 07-21-2015, 07:48 PM
 
Location: Western North Carolina
5,040 posts, read 8,029,561 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the city View Post

Why is it that middle end malls are dying and higher end malls are staying around?
This is no mystery to me at all, it's obvious. It needs to be noted here that second hand stores and Goodwills are thriving and staying around also. Again, not a mystery.
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Old 07-22-2015, 06:24 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 11,033,169 times
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I think clothing department based malls will go with the wind. Some lifestyle centers anchored by Wal-Mart and Target will last.

This is, to me, is a prime example of a great modern age mall:

Home - The Collection Riverpark

Honestly, selection and cheapest prices will control the market. Malls are a high-end thing for women and children with extra cash to spend on clothes. Online has both. Most big box centers have them and it's also more convenient and some people like me find it relaxing to go out and shop for cheap stuff.

Now, I wouldn't mind seeing a department store in big box centers. In fact, it's been done, but doesn't seem to be doing so well.

Promenade at Casa Grande | Map
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Old 07-24-2015, 08:51 PM
 
579 posts, read 538,656 times
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My husband and I should switch genders. I am swift about shopping for my own clothes whereas my husband can spend HOURS looking for the perfect shirt. I usually would be the one to rush him to hurry up. I am usually the one pushing the stroller around and him turning around to ask me "what do you think about this?"
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Old 07-24-2015, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,017 posts, read 18,068,306 times
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Doesn't everyone agree that on average, women enjoy shopping more than men, whereas men shop from necessity and are just glad to get whatever they need in the minimum time necessary? Shopping as an enjoyable activity per se is a mysterious concept to me.
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Old 07-25-2015, 10:35 PM
 
4,841 posts, read 11,033,169 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Escort Rider View Post
Doesn't everyone agree that on average, women enjoy shopping more than men, whereas men shop from necessity and are just glad to get whatever they need in the minimum time necessary? Shopping as an enjoyable activity per se is a mysterious concept to me.
Yeah but do women even still prefer malls?

There are way too many places to get clothes already. From discounters like Marshall's and Kohl's to outlet malls to regular malls to downtown locally owned stores.
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Old 07-26-2015, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
28,048 posts, read 16,329,186 times
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I'm a man and I love to goto the lone mall in the near area. That said, nine times out of ten unless there is a REAL sale, I just window shop. I like checking out Disney Store (more to check it out and get a Disney fix because their shirts suck being organic cotton), Hot Topic, Sears, Just Sports, Dick's and of course the AMC theater by it. I do check out the food court from time to time too.
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Old 07-26-2015, 08:18 AM
 
7,245 posts, read 3,976,312 times
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As a male, shopping to be shopping in a mall is kind of pointless. Mainly because all the stores today are pretty much clones of one another selling the same stuff with just a different label. Even the anchor stores like Sears and Penny are shadows of their former selves, focusing mainly on so called "fashion" than on useful products. For my wife's birthday I took her on a shopping spree to the big mall in the city. After an all day marathon, she came home with only a couple of items costing over $200. Not because she didn't want others but because they didn't "fit." Modern "fashion" tends to be designed toward an unrealistic body shape that maybe 1% of women have (IE Barbie doll). IE a shirt that fits here didn't also fit there. The colors were terrible. Maybe OK for a 15 year old, but not a grown woman.

The end result being, why spend all day and several hundred dollars when the end result is no different than Walmart at 29.95? It's the lack of selection and overpriced product that is pushing the consumer away from malls and into the BORGs or on line. There are plenty of folks who would love the mall experience, but not the waste of time.
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Old 07-26-2015, 08:34 AM
 
2,101 posts, read 1,647,352 times
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Alot of young men go to malls because there are women there...for most young men, they could just as easily go to the stand alone Finishline/Footlocker/Champs 2 blocks over...but but I suspect the allure of "accidentally" bumping into flocks of attractive women is probably what makes going to the mall the better choice.
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Old 07-26-2015, 02:21 PM
 
Location: The Circle City. Sometimes NE of Bagdad.
19,129 posts, read 19,978,923 times
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^^ You hit the nail on the head.
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Old 07-26-2015, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Buckeye, AZ
28,048 posts, read 16,329,186 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
As a male, shopping to be shopping in a mall is kind of pointless. Mainly because all the stores today are pretty much clones of one another selling the same stuff with just a different label. Even the anchor stores like Sears and Penny are shadows of their former selves, focusing mainly on so called "fashion" than on useful products. For my wife's birthday I took her on a shopping spree to the big mall in the city. After an all day marathon, she came home with only a couple of items costing over $200. Not because she didn't want others but because they didn't "fit." Modern "fashion" tends to be designed toward an unrealistic body shape that maybe 1% of women have (IE Barbie doll). IE a shirt that fits here didn't also fit there. The colors were terrible. Maybe OK for a 15 year old, but not a grown woman.

The end result being, why spend all day and several hundred dollars when the end result is no different than Walmart at 29.95? It's the lack of selection and overpriced product that is pushing the consumer away from malls and into the BORGs or on line. There are plenty of folks who would love the mall experience, but not the waste of time.
The mall I have has a Sears and the tool section is right at the parking lot entrance for the second floor.
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