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Old 09-26-2015, 11:36 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles (Native)
25,306 posts, read 15,959,794 times
Reputation: 12184

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I've noticed this trend but I agree it's usually people that don't even have the service dog vest. It seems this trend has increased in recent years. I don't know what the official policy is . But I often see dogs at Target and in malls.

Some people are so attached to their pets that they don't view them as animals .
People should follow the store rules if the store only allows service animals .

I know what you mean though as had a family friend that tried to claim her dog was a service animal but I don't think she even had a vest for it and the supermarket told her she needed to leave . Some people think the rules don't apply to them though unfortunately .
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Old 09-26-2015, 01:46 PM
 
7,257 posts, read 4,507,099 times
Reputation: 18773
Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
I prefer that people not bring pets into the store, but in answer to your question: Yes. Even nice kids do. They cough and sneeze; they wipe their noses, they put their hands in their mouths - and they touch stuff. They touch the cart (even with their mouths), and they touch the merchandise. Also, parents bring sick children into the store.

I have never seen a dog touch the merchandise, and I've never seen an obviously sick dog in the store.
Yes, and not to mention the fact that you are actually susceptible to catching a cold or the flu or a stomach virus from the sick child who is shedding pathogens that affect humans. What dog disease do you fear you are going to catch--distemper?

On the one hand I believe people should obey the rules, and not bring a dog where it is not allowed. On the other, a quiet well-behaved dog does not bother me in the slightest. So what if there are a few dog hairs here or there? What about the human hairs, and the insect parts? (Have you ever researched the acceptable level of insect parts or rodent hairs in food?) Getting hysterical because you believe dogs are "insanitary" is a waste of time. The world is not a sterile place.
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Old 09-26-2015, 02:03 PM
 
Location: Camberville
12,289 posts, read 17,106,918 times
Reputation: 20542
Just because someone looks healthy doesn't mean that they are. The only service dog I'm in regular contact with belongs to someone who looks like a healthy woman in her early 20s. What you don't see is that she was on dialysis for 5 years and had a kidney transplant several years ago. She is diabetic as a result of the steroids she has to take and has severe panic attacks as a result of the medications she is currently on. To top it off, she also has seizures. Her service dog is trained to detect low blood sugar or an oncoming seizure. But she "looks perfectly healthy."

Honestly, dogs bother me a lot less than people in the grocery store. And I'm not even talking about the miniature humans. The grown-ups are downright nasty on their own - especially during cold and flu season!
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Old 09-26-2015, 03:20 PM
 
Location: So Ca
16,626 posts, read 15,647,155 times
Reputation: 14531
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinema Cat View Post
I read an article by a woman who began by referring to her cat as "my son." She paused to tell readers not to bother with angry emails, or try to argue with her, repeating, "He is my son."
That's the funniest thing I've heard all week.

Quote:
I once actually saw a woman pushing a baby stroller -- with a dog inside.
We have a neighbor who does this also.
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Old 09-26-2015, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,249 posts, read 1,789,477 times
Reputation: 3828
Quote:
Originally Posted by sll3454 View Post
I prefer that people not bring pets into the store, but in answer to your question: Yes. Even nice kids do. They cough and sneeze; they wipe their noses, they put their hands in their mouths - and they touch stuff. They touch the cart (even with their mouths), and they touch the merchandise. Also, parents bring sick children into the store.

I have never seen a dog touch the merchandise, and I've never seen an obviously sick dog in the store.
You are proving my point by equating dogs as basically the equivalent as humans. The fact is dogs in grocery stores or restaurants are a far greater health risk than humans.

The Food and Drug Administration's food guide lays down common sense rules: with few exceptions, live animals of any kind are not permitted on the premises of a grocery store, a restaurant or other food establishment. The prohibition applies to dogs, cats, birds and other animals. Animals are unsanitary, and the law protects the national food supply from contamination from dog drool, urine, feces and other material that dogs carry on their coats and paws and might leave behind on store shelves or counters.
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Old 09-26-2015, 04:06 PM
 
7,257 posts, read 4,507,099 times
Reputation: 18773
In a 2011 study, 72% of shopping cart handles were contaminated with human fecal bacteria. 50% were found to be carrying E. coli:

E. coli found on 50 percent of shopping carts - Health - Children's health | NBC News

Clearly, people do not belong in grocery stores. Let's keep those filthy humans out of our food supply!
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Old 09-26-2015, 04:18 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,735 posts, read 18,236,387 times
Reputation: 31796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinema Cat View Post

I see these selfish brats bring their dogs into Vons and Whole Foods and Starbucks. Usually these dogs are little "toy dogs," more a kind of rat-dog.

If you're so emotionally crippled that you need a little rat-dog with you at all times, then you belong in a straight jacket. People that emotionally/mentally crippled should not be let loose on the streets.

And if you're not that emotionally crippled, then the dog is a lie. You're just a selfish brat (usually a woman) who WANTS what she WANTS, and so you buy a bogus vest and badge, or get some therapist to lie for you.

Unfortunately, the dog owners lobby is powerful. They pressure legislators to pass laws allowing them to bring their rat-dogs onto planes and into stores.
I get your argument, but don't you think substituting 'rat dog' for 'child' and 'dog owner' for 'parent' is just a little bit extreme?
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Concrete Canyon, CA
176 posts, read 153,563 times
Reputation: 302
I can't stand this either. When did it become socially acceptable to drag your mangy pet everywhere you go. And when did "pet parent" become acceptable nomenclature? Pet parent?! Really, tell me again how that thing dropped out of your uterus.
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:15 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
34,454 posts, read 43,301,321 times
Reputation: 44120
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robsteel17 View Post
I can't stand this either. When did it become socially acceptable to drag your mangy pet everywhere you go. And when did "pet parent" become acceptable nomenclature? Pet parent?! Really, tell me again how that thing dropped out of your uterus.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5UyQPLpJbx0
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Old 09-26-2015, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Seattle, WA
2,962 posts, read 3,913,079 times
Reputation: 3290
Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
In a 2011 study, 72% of shopping cart handles were contaminated with human fecal bacteria. 50% were found to be carrying E. coli:

E. coli found on 50 percent of shopping carts - Health - Children's health | NBC News

Clearly, people do not belong in grocery stores. Let's keep those filthy humans out of our food supply!
Seriously, a lot of ignorance is being spewed in this thread. Humans, especially snotty, coughing little kids, carry a slew of bacteria. Dogs don't usually carry anything that would get a human sick. People are a lot better off in a store full of dogs than a store full of virus-carrying, human germ-sacks.
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