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Old 09-27-2015, 11:46 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,886 posts, read 2,153,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalfur View Post
I like this idea!! I think my biggest problem is the meat prices have gone up a bit and so have the boys wanting to eat more of it. I am looking for rural land at the time but don't want to get ripped off. I think it would help to have room to grow enough and have more of a mini farm which is not permitted in the deeded neighborhood I live in. Do you know of any trust worthy places- such as farmers or meat markets that would ship to TEXAS? I grew up with farming Grandparents but my Mother was a city person. If I could save on food than I could make better investments with the savings.??????
Some things you can grow in pots, like tomatoes, green beans and squashes (which will trail out of the pot, but who cares?). These can be grown with little water use in pots....in any neighborhood.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:58 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,886 posts, read 2,153,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
That's a great tip about the turkeys. I also buy a few smaller ones to have throughout the year, besides the big one I buy at Thanksgiving. They are such a great way to feed a lot of people economically.
And if you buy them at a store with a butcher they can cut the turkeys in 1/2 and then they take less space in the freezer and you get a more normal amount of food at that meal, and not as much left overs.

And with the on sale Easter hams, I always ask the butcher to take a few slices off the center then we have a smaller ham and center cuts for ham steaks. And use the ham bone for beam soup
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Old 09-28-2015, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,886 posts, read 2,153,741 times
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I'd suggest you try changing your snack routine to vegetable snacks. Have carrot sticks and celery pre-cut in the frig and offer them for snacks. Or a small salad. Your kids are old enough that they should not 'need' a major snack.

Also, maybe start your dinner with an appetizer. That lets them start eating and hopefully their bodies will have more 'time' eating and can register as full with a smaller main dinner. For the appetizer offer things with high 'volume' and low cost such as soups -vegetable, egg drop, chicken noodle (made with left over chicken), potato, bean, even ramon or chili, etc. Eat it slowly and talk so their bodies can start to fill full. Do not use nuts or cheese and cracker type appetizers as that would only increase your costs and they are not a quickly filling as a soup.

Then for your dinner keep the protein to 3-4 ounces per person...including the cheese. Supplement with vegetable, as in stir frys, or with other carbs. But make the non-protein the 'star' of the dinner. And use different types of dinners such as chili over corn bread or vegetables with a little chicken in gravy over mashed potatoes. Butternut squash with brown sugar, spaghetti squash with pasta sauce, cauliflower with cheese sauce, etc. One of my kids favorites is leftover rice, chicken, vegetables, sometimes cheese, and a can of cream of celery /chicken soup and milk added to make a creamy texture, just warm in the oven. ITs different each time depending on the vegetables.

BTW, we sometimes have ramon--one pack for the family with added mixed vegetables and a can of chicken, or left over chicken.
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Old 09-28-2015, 01:02 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
10,551 posts, read 5,807,487 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cupper3 View Post
Freezer burn. No biggy, just cut it off.

I found some 16 year old deer meat in the bottom of my freezer. Though I would have to feed it to the dog, but instead, checked it out, trimmed some of the freezer burn off (there was not much because I am very careful the way butcher and package my meat), and it tasted just fine.
Sounds like my ice box.

I was going to make a salmon steak stew on Saturday (stored perhaps 4-5 years ago when $2.97/lb whole salmon disappeared from the HEB shelves)........but it was so filled with brisket, I couldn't easily find the right size steak, so I opted for a steak (brisket) stew instead. Eat down the meat some so I can find the fish.

Quote:
Originally Posted by moxiegal View Post
.......Dried Beans-pintos....I make into beans and rice........
I use black beans, brown rice, and black eyed peas for my beans and rice. It tends to make its own appetizing taste without additional spices.

Pinto beans are cheap but take a time to cook....except for me in stew. As such, I put a handful from my massive stocks (because they were so cheap) in each stew.
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Old 09-28-2015, 02:41 AM
 
1,242 posts, read 662,467 times
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An hour after dinner

"I'm hungry!"

"Then go to bed!"
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Old 09-28-2015, 07:04 AM
 
3,198 posts, read 1,879,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalfur View Post
That's a good point also. I was afraid of buying boarder line bad meats. I had a pot roast turn brown around the edges towards the center after 2 months in the freezer..not sure why?
Another mystery. You buy tremendous amounts of food every week, but freeze pot roasts for months? Maybe it would save money for you to eat from your freezer before buying fresh?
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Old 09-28-2015, 07:08 AM
 
Location: SC
2,001 posts, read 1,212,592 times
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Sometimes I get lucky and make it to the store and find the recently marked down meats. I pick up what I can from those selections first. Use first, or put in freezer and use soon after.
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Old 09-28-2015, 09:24 AM
 
Location: Location: Location
6,416 posts, read 8,006,615 times
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kalfur, I don't think you're crazy. I do think you may be worrying over nothing. Perhaps the people who (you say) are staring at your cart are having the same problem as you and are simply getting ideas about what they can do to supplement their pantries.

I had five boys and I know how hard it is to keep them full. I had a strict rule for one period when things were especially hard - do not eat anything unless you ask permission. They understood that anything that looked like it would feed seven people was going to do just that.

The celery/carrots/bell pepper strips were okay to eat. With a cup of yoghurt for dipping, it was a good after-school snack. (The cup of yoghurt was split among all of them)

There was a hot bread every night. Biscuits, rolls, cornbread, etc, can fill that empty spot nicely.

The kids will have to learn, if they don't already know, that they can't be picky eaters.

Your freezer is your friend. Our markets have a section in the Produce dept. where they are selling vegetables that are past their peak. They are good for soup; make a vat. Freeze it in portion-size containers. Same for stew; a little meat goes a long way. Pick up a fresh loaf of Italian bread on your way home from work and fill'em up!

Look for sale items. Shop more than one store for the sales. Buy ONLY what's on sale. This is a temporary dilemma and you should stop worrying about stocking your pantry. As long as you have sufficient to eat this week, you're doing okay. You'll have to spend time with the flyers for all the local stores and make a list for each one. For SALE items. Plan your menus. Waste nothing.

Gelatin dessert is cheap and a bit special if you buy a can of RediWhip and add a squirt before serving. It only costs a couple of dollars and used judiciously, it lasts quite a while. Makes your kids feel less deprived.

Stretch your milk. Buy regular milk and powdered milk. Mix the powdered milk and cut the regular milk by half. Chill well and I promise you, they won't know the difference. Twice the milk for less money.

As others have mentioned, oatmeal, legumes, pastas, are all nutritious and filling.

Work all the techniques you've been given in this thread and you'll cut your spending.
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Old 09-28-2015, 11:53 AM
 
4,586 posts, read 4,714,423 times
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Keep voting these jerks, and your pantry will never be half full even!!!

I buy very little too and noticed a trend with Sam's that they change/gouge heavily on certain days a week! Cereal boxes are now half empty but cost more too! It's a joke!

We eat pretty much the same things and don't eat 3 full meals per day! Lunch is out biggest meal, and the kids eat breakfast at school, which is free for all here), and then dinner is more like snaking than anything else. It's not good to eat big dinners after 5pm anyway, so we don't.
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Old 09-28-2015, 12:22 PM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 6,255,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PhotoProIP View Post
Keep voting these jerks, and your pantry will never be half full even!!!

I buy very little too and noticed a trend with Sam's that they change/gouge heavily on certain days a week! Cereal boxes are now half empty but cost more too! It's a joke!

We eat pretty much the same things and don't eat 3 full meals per day! Lunch is out biggest meal, and the kids eat breakfast at school, which is free for all here), and then dinner is more like snaking than anything else. It's not good to eat big dinners after 5pm anyway, so we don't.
As a Canadian snowbird, I am seriously reconsidering whether or not to renew my Sam's membership. There are no Sam's in Canada, and I would get a Costco membership if there was one close to me; there is not.

However, with the 2 Aldi stores in driving distance, I find they are much less anyways than Sam's. The biggest reason I used them was for gas on my 2800 mile trip. However, with Gas Buddy, I found that they are not necessarily the cheapest, and even in the Tamp area, places like Wawa often are the same or very close. I found I bought less and less at Sam's, and the $40 membership fee doesn't make sense.

Perhaps if Sam's truly were competitive on food items, I might reconsider.
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