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Old 09-27-2015, 10:30 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
23,504 posts, read 30,102,811 times
Reputation: 46472

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You ask for specific meals.

Breakfast, buy a 25 pound bag of rolled oats from the bulk foods section.. Use that to make granola, serve cooked oatmeal, serve oatmeal cookies and milk. Yes, that's right. Homemade oatmeal cookies contain less sugar than sugary cereals. If you make them at home, there will be an egg in there, too, for a touch of protein.

If there is a day old bread store, you can buy that nasty cheap sandwich bread often 3 or more loaves for a dollar. It makes great french toast and grilled cheese sandwiches. French Toast contains milk and eggs for protein and calcium. Top it with a sprinkle of powdered sugar and a few slices of fruit. Dont buy syrup which is nothing but expensive empty calories.

Grilled cheese sandwich is good for breakfast. Use the cheap bread and be stingy with the cheese.

Baked goods is where the biggest savings are in the budget. You can buy cheap bread, but if your family likes good bread, learn to bake. Cakes, cookies, pies, if it is baked, you can make it much cheaper at home and you can make it a lot healthier.

When I make hot cooked oatmeal, I add a couple of drops of vanilla extract and a few dried cranberries to the water to make the oatmeal more interesting. Some brown sugar and milk to serve it.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,035 posts, read 46,836,164 times
Reputation: 63990
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
To anyone with a food price issue, I offer the following advice. It comes from my second daughter, who has 4 children, 2 of them in their teens. P.S. - they are all very well fed!

* Buy yourself a chest freezer, even if used. You will need this.
* When turkey goes on sale at the holidays, stock up. Use the freezer.
* When ham goes on sale for Easter, stock up. Use the freezer.
* When tomatoes come into season, buy the 'uglies' at a farmer's market. Use the freezer.
* Buy your potatoes, onions and carrots in large bags, preferably at farmers markets. Keep in a cool dry place all winter, and they will last. Ditto for apples, in fall.
* Buy your rice in 50-lb sacks. Feed dealers sell large sacks of corn, wheat, and other grains.

If you do these things, your kids won't ever go hungry. Trying to feed teenagers from supermarket canned goods is a losing battle. That's the most expensive way to eat. I would add, learn to can your own. Lots of produce goes to waste, because no one knows what to do with it!
That's a great tip about the turkeys. I also buy a few smaller ones to have throughout the year, besides the big one I buy at Thanksgiving. They are such a great way to feed a lot of people economically.
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Old 09-27-2015, 11:23 AM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,929 posts, read 4,215,349 times
Reputation: 15621
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
What I do:


*Bag of iceberg lettuce (3 of 'em in a bag...cost about $5 for the bag)

*Fruit - Fruit is pricey. I buy fresh fruit ONLY on sale or the large bags at Sam's. OR I will buy a HUGE bag of frozen fruit at Sam's. It's costly, but none of it goes to waste (it's frozen!) and will last a while. Or I'll buy a whole round watermelon at WalMart for $5.
*If fruit is too pricey, and you choose to buy cookies or such for snacks, buy only generic and/or on sale and/or with a coupon.

.
OP, avoid iceberg lettuce. Stick with romaine or salad greens. Iceberg has zero nutritional value. I just bought a big tub of organic salad greens for $4 at Sam's - cheaper than iceberg AND better for you.

Buy fruit that is in season - right now that means apples. Also, when fruit does go on sale, such as blueberries and raspberries that were on sale earlier in the summer, buy a lot and freeze them. Buy apples now and make applesauce and freeze or can it.

Cookies are much, much cheaper (and better) if they are homemade. The oatmeal cookies are a wonderful suggestion. Peanut butter cookies are also good, and of course, the old standby, chocolate chip. With homemade cookies, bars, cakes, and desserts, YOU control how much sugar goes in these (and there are far less preservatives and other garbage).
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Old 09-27-2015, 01:00 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
6,731 posts, read 8,110,868 times
Reputation: 16621
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nor'Eastah View Post
To anyone with a food price issue, I offer the following advice. It comes from my second daughter, who has 4 children, 2 of them in their teens. P.S. - they are all very well fed!

* Buy yourself a chest freezer, even if used. You will need this.
* When turkey goes on sale at the holidays, stock up. Use the freezer.
* When ham goes on sale for Easter, stock up. Use the freezer.
* When tomatoes come into season, buy the 'uglies' at a farmer's market. Use the freezer.
* Buy your potatoes, onions and carrots in large bags, preferably at farmers markets. Keep in a cool dry place all winter, and they will last. Ditto for apples, in fall.
* Buy your rice in 50-lb sacks. Feed dealers sell large sacks of corn, wheat, and other grains.

If you do these things, your kids won't ever go hungry. Trying to feed teenagers from supermarket canned goods is a losing battle. That's the most expensive way to eat. I would add, learn to can your own. Lots of produce goes to waste, because no one knows what to do with it!
If one doesn't have room for a chest freezer, upright freezer's take less room. I've shopped like this for years, and continue to do so even though we are now empty nesters.

Today I purchased a 3 lb. pork tenderloin on sale for $1.49/lb. I cut it up into 6 smaller pieces, sized for 2 people, when I arrived home. One portion is now cooking in the crock pot. The rest will be used over the next few months.

A few weeks ago I purchased the "ugly" tomatoes and peppers at the farmers market. For us this means less waste as we can freeze smaller amounts appropriate for two people. Less waste=less money.

Add a crock pot or two to the mix, and healthy, filling meals are cheap and easy. Just don't use the "mix in a can of soup" recipes.

It's easier to make meals and spend less out on fast food when one has something in the freezer. As a parent that worked outside the home for many years, the freezer and crockpot "saved" me many times.

OP--build your meals around what is on sale each week and buy a bit extra to stock up when there is a very good sale. Get as many high fiber, complex carbs into the family meals as you can. It's healthier and more filling. Make meat less of a focus in your meals. Combine it with veggies, carbs, etc. Snacks should be fresh fruit or veggies. Don't waste money on individual packages of canned fruits, etc. Get the kids involved in prepping a bag of carrots and celery for snacks and lunches for the week.
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Old 09-27-2015, 01:15 PM
 
133 posts, read 133,578 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
If one doesn't have room for a chest freezer, upright freezer's take less room. I've shopped like this for years, and continue to do so even though we are now empty nesters.

Today I purchased a 3 lb. pork tenderloin on sale for $1.49/lb. I cut it up into 6 smaller pieces, sized for 2 people, when I arrived home. One portion is now cooking in the crock pot. The rest will be used over the next few months.

A few weeks ago I purchased the "ugly" tomatoes and peppers at the farmers market. For us this means less waste as we can freeze smaller amounts appropriate for two people. Less waste=less money.

Add a crock pot or two to the mix, and healthy, filling meals are cheap and easy. Just don't use the "mix in a can of soup" recipes.

It's easier to make meals and spend less out on fast food when one has something in the freezer. As a parent that worked outside the home for many years, the freezer and crockpot "saved" me many times.

OP--build your meals around what is on sale each week and buy a bit extra to stock up when there is a very good sale. Get as many high fiber, complex carbs into the family meals as you can. It's healthier and more filling. Make meat less of a focus in your meals. Combine it with veggies, carbs, etc. Snacks should be fresh fruit or veggies. Don't waste money on individual packages of canned fruits, etc. Get the kids involved in prepping a bag of carrots and celery for snacks and lunches for the week.
Pretty good idea....I think I do spend a little bit on snacks. The are healthy snacks - like mixed nuts which are $$, they seem to like dried fruits so maybe I will purchase a hydrator to do my own dried fruits. Where did you get a 3lb. pork tenderloin for $1.49/lb.? I'm in Houston, TX. 77084. Do you know of an App that could inform me of daily sales comparison in my area?
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Old 09-27-2015, 01:52 PM
 
3,722 posts, read 3,289,855 times
Reputation: 11350
You need to check out Aldi and Fiesta stores. Some people love Aldi because it has lower prices. I have different dietary preferences, but would not hesitate to buy the food there if I needed to cut my budget. Fiesta has lower prices on fruits and veggies and some other foods if you know your prices. Here is the Fiesta weekly ad. http://www.fiestamart.com/umbraco/st...s/Store_56.pdf Chicken leg quarters are $.39/lb.

You need to get online and look at store ads. Here is an HEB ad from what I believe is a local store for you. https://www.heb.com/weekly-ads/weekly-deals/553
They have a great deal on split chicken breasts @ $1/lb and pork loin @ $1.47/lb.

Kroger has whole chicken, drumsticks or thighs for $0.69/lb. https://www.kroger.com/weeklyAd
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Old 09-27-2015, 02:12 PM
 
46 posts, read 30,248 times
Reputation: 39
I got too much food in my house. Our concern is finishing everything before The Expiry Date. I think I should buy An Extra Freezer. Whenever we drive to a big city, we get tons of Cool fast food like 5 guys, and stuff (we live in rural nowhere and dont have that stuff), then Freeze it!
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Old 09-27-2015, 02:18 PM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 6,255,015 times
Reputation: 4535
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe Wayne View Post
I got too much food in my house. Our concern is finishing everything before The Expiry Date. I think I should buy An Extra Freezer. Whenever we drive to a big city, we get tons of Cool fast food like 5 guys, and stuff (we live in rural nowhere and dont have that stuff), then Freeze it!
Very few items are bad because of expiry dates... often those are just 'CYA' marketing.

I save tons by buying almost expiring items as they are always discounted, often by 50%. In fact, the first thing I do when going to a grocery store is head for the discount rack if it has one, or if not, scan the aisles to see what is being discounted due to expiry. If it is something I would normally buy, then I do. I don't buy items I wouldn't buy normally... that is false economy.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,400 posts, read 48,160,839 times
Reputation: 20040
I buy alot of day old food from Kroger's and the problem here in Tennessee is we pay sales taxes on food.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:20 PM
 
7,462 posts, read 4,112,269 times
Reputation: 15426
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeachSalsa View Post
OP, avoid iceberg lettuce. Stick with romaine or salad greens. Iceberg has zero nutritional value. I just bought a big tub of organic salad greens for $4 at Sam's - cheaper than iceberg AND better for you.

Buy fruit that is in season - right now that means apples. Also, when fruit does go on sale, such as blueberries and raspberries that were on sale earlier in the summer, buy a lot and freeze them. Buy apples now and make applesauce and freeze or can it.

Cookies are much, much cheaper (and better) if they are homemade. The oatmeal cookies are a wonderful suggestion. Peanut butter cookies are also good, and of course, the old standby, chocolate chip. With homemade cookies, bars, cakes, and desserts, YOU control how much sugar goes in these (and there are far less preservatives and other garbage).
The reason I suggest the iceberg is that it is so much CHEAPER. I buy the $4 organic dark green tubs @ Sam's, too. THEY GO BAD REALLY QUICKLY and cost more than the iceberg. I am single. I get to eat maybe 1/4th of the tub before it starts going bad. I use those green veggie tubs to make them last a little longer. The most I've ever been able to eat before it went bad was maybe 1/2 of the tub. ICEBERG LETTUCE LASTS MUCH, MUCH LONGER THAN ANY OTHER TYPE OF LETTUCE, AND COSTS MUCH LESS. So a person gets a double bang for the buck. Go iceberg to save money. Unless you're making big salads, nutritional content for the small amount that people use on sandwiches or small salads doesn't matter.

Fresh fruit is too expensive, unless it's on sale or you get it at Sam's or a place like that. Berries are out of the question. Where I live, they are several dollars for a pint. GET FROZEN FRUIT for the most bang for the buck, berries included. Farmer's Markets may have fruit for reasonable prices, though (if a person who works & has kids has time to go to farmer's markets).

Exception to the high cost of fresh fruit is apples and oranges. They go on sale frequently, and come in big bags at Sam's at a discounted price. Still pricey, but possibly doable, if there is enough money.

The OP works and has kids. There isn't much time to look for and clip coupons and made homemade bread and homemade cookies and such. To the extent she can, that's great. If there isn't time, generic cookies and/or coupons will make cookies an inexpensive treat.
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