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Old 09-27-2015, 03:31 PM
 
133 posts, read 133,578 times
Reputation: 101

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Quote:
Originally Posted by cupper3 View Post
Very few items are bad because of expiry dates... often those are just 'CYA' marketing.

I save tons by buying almost expiring items as they are always discounted, often by 50%. In fact, the first thing I do when going to a grocery store is head for the discount rack if it has one, or if not, scan the aisles to see what is being discounted due to expiry. If it is something I would normally buy, then I do. I don't buy items I wouldn't buy normally... that is false economy.
That's a good point also. I was afraid of buying boarder line bad meats. I had a pot roast turn brown around the edges towards the center after 2 months in the freezer..not sure why?
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:47 PM
 
Location: I am right here.
4,929 posts, read 4,215,349 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
The reason I suggest the iceberg is that it is so much CHEAPER. I buy the $4 organic dark green tubs @ Sam's, too. THEY GO BAD REALLY QUICKLY and cost more than the iceberg. I am single. I get to eat maybe 1/4th of the tub before it starts going bad. .
I am single too....I use up one organic tub per week. I make salads for work every day. Sometimes I make a smoothie for dinner and toss in a handful of the greens. Those vitamin packed nutritious greens are much more versatile than boring, bland, nutrionless iceberg.

OP should think about the quality of the food, too. Sure, she could feed her family iceberg and get zero nutrition. Or she could feed them greens and get some nutrition into her family. Penny wise, pound foolish.

Quote:
Fresh fruit is too expensive, unless it's on sale or you get it at Sam's or a place like that. Berries are out of the question. Where I live, they are several dollars for a pint.
Grocery stores often have fresh fruit on sale. Buy whatever is on sale that week. When berries were in season, YES they were on sale for cheap! THAT is when a smart shopper buys them AND then freezes them. I find that local grocery stores often have fruit CHEAPER than Sam's Club - except for bananas. Sam's rocks at their banana prices.
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Old 09-27-2015, 03:50 PM
 
9,966 posts, read 9,598,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalfur View Post
More paranoid by the prices, than others assumptions. Do you have children? If so, what's a good budget for family?

I'm not sure one person can randomly make a budget for another - there's such a difference in prices according to where you are and what stores you have access to.

I think perhaps that part of the effort needs to go to ensure that the family has the right mindset. For instance, I'd avoid buying any sugared dry cereals, which apart from not being particularly nutritious, are incredibly expensive on a per-pound basis. I'd get the family used to eating generic packaged products whenever possible. I'd avoid prepared or partly prepared food that ends up costing more. I'd experiment with cheaper vegetable, such as cabbage, instead of expensive ones, like asparagus. I wouldn't buy produce out of season, when it costs more. I'd encourage apples for snacks, instead of cookies.

Good luck!
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Old 09-27-2015, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 13,812,881 times
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When I was still in high school I worked part-time as a clerk in a small town quick-type mart. Every night the same guy came in and bought a roll of Rolaids and a pack of cigarettes on his way home from work. Even at that young age (and that's before cigs became health enemy #1) I remember thinking, "Maybe that guy should go get checked for an ulcer." That's about the last time I remember paying attention to anyone's purchases and I worked retail of all types for a long time.
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Old 09-27-2015, 04:15 PM
 
Location: SC
2,001 posts, read 1,212,592 times
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Mixed nuts (generic)...just here..at the Super Walmart..went from $7. to over $11.00. I buy the ingredients for the mixed trail mix...nuts, cashews, M&M's, raisins....and mix it all in a big bowl for DH. Way cheaper than the pre-mixed bags.

Walmart also marks down their bakery french loaves from $1.00 down to $.60 per loaf. I buy two or three.....make french toast, and croutons.

Dried Beans-pintos....I make into beans and rice. Add one or 2 packages of turkey kielbasa just before they are ready to serve. Steam some long cooking rice in a rice steamer. Makes for an excellent filling supper.

Dice up 3 or 4 fresh potatoes, one onion, stalk of celery...boil in pan of water for 20 minutes. When finished, add a can of condensed milk (or 2) to the undrained potatoes and veggies. Add diced cooked ham or bacon if some meat is desired.

Serve in a big bowl over fresh baked cornbread-from scratch. Another great -delicious- and cheap meal


If you purchase a rotisserie chicken...the next day..boil down the carcass into broth. Strip remaining meat from bones. Add a pack of flat noodles, thicken the broth with some cornstarch mixed into a little bit of cold water.
Pour hot steaming chicken and noodles over a pile of creamed fresh potatoes......serve with a slice of that marked down french bread..... a very cheap and filling affordable supper..for the whole family!


Fried rice is an excellent $$ stretcher also.
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Old 09-27-2015, 05:43 PM
 
Location: In a little house on the prairie - literally
10,202 posts, read 6,255,015 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kalfur View Post
That's a good point also. I was afraid of buying boarder line bad meats. I had a pot roast turn brown around the edges towards the center after 2 months in the freezer..not sure why?
Freezer burn. No biggy, just cut it off.

I found some 16 year old deer meat in the bottom of my freezer. Though I would have to feed it to the dog, but instead, checked it out, trimmed some of the freezer burn off (there was not much because I am very careful the way butcher and package my meat), and it tasted just fine.
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Old 09-27-2015, 05:51 PM
 
Location: Our own little Loonyverse
238 posts, read 189,538 times
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Looks like you got some great ideas. I will reiterate that using meat as the accent is where you will save the most $. If they are still hungry then use bread, rice, etc for fillers. My husband and his siblings still say - I'm telling mom you ate ham without bread.

Soups are super budget friendly I try to make a HUGE pot at least once a week, often 2 or 3 and that's our go to when we are hungry and it's not meal time. Lentil or some type of bean soup are almost always found in my fridge, and we also have several varieties in the freezer.

For snacks, baked sweet or regular potatoes or oven baked fries (even if you use frozen french fries or tater tots or whatever) are more filling than chips.

In our area, we have a "day old" bread store and can get the good breads - 100% whole grain, tons of varieties, for $1. or $1.49. You live in a large area- Google or ask around to see what is available.

We also have a Big Lots - they don't have everything, but what they do have is often cheaper than the markets.

I am with you on the prices/sizes/etc. It's unreal how costly some things have gotten and we've had to make changes here as well. Good luck to you, I'm sure you will do great getting the budget down with all of these helpful tips.

Last edited by dddiva; 09-27-2015 at 06:05 PM..
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:04 PM
 
46 posts, read 30,248 times
Reputation: 39
Quote:
Originally Posted by cupper3 View Post
Very few items are bad because of expiry dates... often those are just 'CYA' marketing.

I save tons by buying almost expiring items as they are always discounted, often by 50%. In fact, the first thing I do when going to a grocery store is head for the discount rack if it has one, or if not, scan the aisles to see what is being discounted due to expiry. If it is something I would normally buy, then I do. I don't buy items I wouldn't buy normally... that is false economy.
Really? That's a good idea.
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Old 09-27-2015, 06:28 PM
 
133 posts, read 133,578 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by John1960 View Post
I buy alot of day old food from Kroger's and the problem here in Tennessee is we pay sales taxes on food.
That always get's a lot of people! The more you spend to save then get to the counter for the total it can upset a person. I read here recently about high taxes in CT up on the east coast and Jay T was arguing that there shouldn't be a food tax period because it is a necessity to life for staying alive. While there are higher taxes for luxury goods - food is not one of them. I agreed!!!
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Old 09-27-2015, 07:29 PM
 
133 posts, read 133,578 times
Reputation: 101
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Go easy on meat and processed foods.

Dry goods are cheap and more nutritious than processed foods.

Money-saving protein sources are eggs and beans. A lot of protein bang for the buck.

Get away from beef. It's expensive and not very healthy. I buy frozen chicken parts, and treat myself to a baked chicken from Sam's sometimes (that costs $5....you can hardly buy a raw chicken for that price!). Rolls of frozen turkey meat at WalMart (Jennie-O brand or generic) give a lot of bang for the buck.
I shop for ground turkey- the kind you are talking about. It use to be cheaper than it is now. I think it went from $1.98 for the roll and it's now $3.24 roll. That's just what I deal with when I do go to the store. They are raising the price on what I call Plan B' s. In which they know people will always choose the next best thing- so they are already one step ahead to increase that also. I noticed weird items that aren't commonly chosen stay at a steady price. It will look weird on your plate and you might not even know what's in it but it may save you money. eggs$$$

Last edited by kalfur; 09-27-2015 at 07:41 PM..
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