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Old 02-29-2008, 11:52 PM
 
12,015 posts, read 33,392,051 times
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Jack Daniels is made in Lynchburg, Tennessee. Lynchburg is in Moore County. Moore County is dry. So even though Jack Daniels is made there, you have to drive across the county line to buy it.

I don't drink and don't understand the attraction. But I think Moore County, Tennessee, has a pretty messed up law.
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Old 03-01-2008, 12:09 AM
j33
 
4,625 posts, read 12,955,905 times
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I'm confused by this dry county thing. Are there actually counties in which there are no places to buy a bottle of wine in the entire county? Why is that?

I understand that some states have laws about how liquor is sold (e.g. the whole weird, you can't buy liquor on Sunday law that some places have), but it seems odd that there are counties where one cannot buy it at all, it isn't as if we are dealing with an illegal substance here.

Where I live there doesn't seem to be much regulation at all, except that you must be 21 years old to buy it (and I'm pretty sure it isn't sold before a certain hour of the day, however, there are some bars that are open during the week at 8am or so up the street, so I don't know when that time is), although there are some weirdo arcane laws that pop up occasionally about how neighborhoods regulate what streets liquor licenses are granted on, and what sort of licenses are granted, but that doesn't affect too much, one can simple walk over to the next street, and usually such regulation is based on trying to address crime related issues or to address to past abuse.
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Old 03-01-2008, 01:59 AM
 
Location: Chicago
287 posts, read 925,038 times
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Not a county, but my hometown in Massachusetts was dry (alcohol is served in some restaurants but there are no liquor stores or bars in town). It seems adorably futile to me, since the town is only 5 sq miles and the first store into any of the neighboring towns and cities is a liquor store.

Why do they bother? Who the hell knows.
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Old 03-01-2008, 02:02 AM
 
Location: New Mexico to Texas
4,552 posts, read 13,575,458 times
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some of the Eastern New Mexico counties wont sell alcohol on sundays and some west texas counties are dry.Where we grew up in E.New Mexico they didnt sell on sundays,so one day my friend made the 30 min trip to a West Texas town to do a beer run and come to find out it was a dry county,sucked for him.
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Old 03-01-2008, 06:14 AM
 
893 posts, read 479,442 times
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Davidson County North Carolina. The city of Lexington inside the county is not though
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Old 03-01-2008, 07:52 AM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,678,525 times
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I have been reading the newspaper from Ft Payne Alabama for many years.

The county and city were dry. Year after year the vote came up to allow it and it got voted down. A state official of tourism was at a meeting there and stated they had much to offer tourism, but being dry hurt them because some people attatch a "stigma" to a dry area.

The city decided to put it up for a vote again. (there is a local city tax on all alcohol sales) The city agreed to donate the entire tax to the school if it passed.

It passed about 2 years ago and every 3 months (quarterly) the city presents the school with the money to help out the school financially.

I thought that was a great example of using a unique idea to help pass it.

In the last 2 years, it appears the passage of going wet has gone well in Fort Payne.
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Old 03-22-2012, 02:14 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,087 times
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Hello-I am doing a project on this for school and am in the process of collecting all of the data! It's astonishing nothing cumulative is on the web when 10% of America's counties are dry. If (when) I finish I will let you know!!
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Old 03-22-2012, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Tyler, TX
15,209 posts, read 18,488,428 times
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List of dry communities by U.S. state - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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