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Old 06-15-2012, 10:38 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,203,071 times
Reputation: 7010

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Quote:
Originally Posted by L.K. View Post
Not sure I would agree with the "most" americans part. MANY have come to have an appreciation for soccer.
It's certainly not a crime, as you say, and no one really has to "care that much", but it just gets old hearing people in this country knocking it. ( and that does happen!) Especially in favor of american traditional sports, and claiming that said sports are superior.
I also stand by my term of dumbass, not just because of soccer though, it goes so much deeper than that.
(But that belongs in another discussion category)
And it gets old hearing people talk about how much greater soccer is over American sports and hearing them insult US because we just so happen to take more intrest in other sports.

If you don't think certain soccer fanatics don't act as sh*t-headed and ignorant as Americans (and Canadians and Aussies, because we are not the only country who has a predominantly apathetic attitude twoards the sport) then you are just lying to yourself. Not you specifically, I'm speaking in general, just so someone doesn't take that the wrong way.

And that's why I said that soccer fans can also be a turn off for their cause. For example:

- Calling it "REAL football" when there are 6 different codes of football in the world.
- bumperstickers that read, "MEN play football. INTELLEGENT MEN play soccer."
- Calling all American athletes fat and overpaid, when in reality, it still takes a certain level of strength and conditioning that most people don't do. Even a 350 pound lineman as to have some agility to tackle a QB or RB in the backfield. And as for the overpaid comment.... Kaka, Toni, Cole, Torres, Beckham? These guys get paid millions to just kick a ball around, no different from Albert Haynesworth, LeBron, and hell, ALL of the Yankees.

 
Old 06-15-2012, 10:46 AM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,821,743 times
Reputation: 16147
Quote:
Originally Posted by paull805 View Post
What is funny is that you took the time to post on the soccer forum
I like soccer. Why wouldn't I take the time to post?
 
Old 06-15-2012, 10:46 AM
 
1,651 posts, read 1,309,545 times
Reputation: 288
Quote:
Originally Posted by JJG View Post
And as for the overpaid comment.... Kaka, Toni, Cole, Torres, Beckham? These guys get paid millions to just kick a ball around, no different from Albert Haynesworth, LeBron, and hell, ALL of the Yankees.
Now there is something we can agree on. Footballers get paid to much. 200k a week some of them get paid. I dont know how much they get in the US but I heard somewhere that Lebron James gets paid $15 million a year just for playing and then he gets $90 million off Nike or something.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Tejas
7,551 posts, read 16,403,415 times
Reputation: 5092
MLS wages are pretty low in comparison, there is wage caps etc. And by pretty low I mean I would still love their salary :P
 
Old 06-15-2012, 11:18 AM
JJG
 
Location: Fort Worth
13,249 posts, read 19,203,071 times
Reputation: 7010
Of course MLS wages aren't as much as the other leagues.

When you're basically the #4/#5 league in the country, you only have 20 teams compared to the 30/32 everyone has, and you're still basically the new guys on the block, with not nearly as much talent as every other league around, salaries will not be as much.

Beckham and he makes about $6.5 mil in his first year in MLS. Now it's Henry with over $5 million. But after that, the average is about what, $1.8.... something like that.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Crooklyn, New York
28,284 posts, read 26,292,241 times
Reputation: 11744
I see this thread has not gone the direction I thought it would.

The underlying point was that soccer in the United States is still largely an elitist, suburban sport and that our performance on the world stage is a product of that reality. Granted, this has changed a bit in recent years with an influx of immigrants (particularly immigrants from Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean), as well as rising popularity among the native population, but the sport is still largely played in formal, structured, and organized settings for most Americans rather than informal, unstructured, and unorganized ones.

My first exposure to basketball was playing with kids from my neighborhood. During summer vacation, we would play from sun up to sun down. I went to my first basketball camp in the fourth grade and began the process of refining the skills I developed playing with my friends. There was a constant back and forth process of gaining creativity, instinct and feel from the street and structure, technique, and fundamentals from organized leagues and camps. I played soccer for about five years, but never really developed that "rawness" because there was really no one around to help me develop it. We spent hours playing basketball games like "21," "All Man," "Around the World," and "Horse." There were no comparable neighborhood games for soccer. Nearly all of my time playing soccer was spent playing in leagues.

I think that's the case for most American soccer players, and if that continues, I doubt we'll ever see someone as gifted as a Ronaldinho.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 12:33 PM
 
Location: Scotland
7,972 posts, read 10,104,922 times
Reputation: 4093
Well it is pretty obvious it is going to go this way with the thread title.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
4,854 posts, read 6,374,960 times
Reputation: 5802
Clint Dempsey was not a rich kid from the suburbs. His parents worked hard for him. Just sayin'.

But I understand your point. Your last post should have been your first. It went the wrong direction because you didn't kick it off well.

I'd also like to add that we'll always be at a disadvantage because we play mosty friendlies. In Europe they are qualifieing for a tournament when not playing in one. Same for South America. They play meaningful games against quality sides. We don't and it will always work against us.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 12:49 PM
 
Location: NJ
17,579 posts, read 39,821,743 times
Reputation: 16147
Quote:
Originally Posted by BajanYankee View Post

The underlying point was that soccer in the United States is still largely an elitist, suburban sport
Elitist? You have got to be kidding me.
 
Old 06-15-2012, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Tejas
7,551 posts, read 16,403,415 times
Reputation: 5092
Eliteist ? Definitely not.

Bondurant I largely agree with you but I also think one of America's biggest problems is the lack of actual competition. They are largely playing poor teams they should be beating in qualifications and dont have enough tough competitive games.
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