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Old 05-09-2016, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,518 posts, read 3,926,778 times
Reputation: 2825

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Ok. I have no desire to continue to debate a person in Charleston about people in Easley's obesity and income levels.

I think it is best we leave health issues like obesity to physicians and other healthcare professionals. I chose to stay in my lane, what other people eat and how much they weigh is not my business. As I have pointed out, you seem to treat number of obese people as a negative for a city similar to traffic congestion, or pollution or lack of jobs. You even took glee in pointing to some list that indicated Greenville has a high number of obese people.

the vast majority of poor people are not obese. Thus, poverty does not lead to obesity. In addition, lack of income is in fact an obstacle to calorie consumption.

If you are so concerned about obesity, why not go talk directly to obese people about it, instead of posting about it anonymously on the internet given there may not be any obese people in your audience on forums like this.

There was a person or two on here that asserted that there are a lot overweight people in Greer, Easley, TR, and poors areas near downtown Greenville. This was also anecdotal and I note that you did not point that out, because it agrees with your own opinion. You also talked about driving around Greenville on a truck which is also anecdotal, and there is no way for us to independently corroborate the veracity of that claim.

The reason I talked about income levels in Easley/Powdersville is to refute the notion it can be broadbrushed as a poor area.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 05-09-2016 at 04:26 PM..
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Old 05-09-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Murrica
3,059 posts, read 1,754,486 times
Reputation: 2011
So, your anecdotes are right, my data is wrong. You are so in love with Greenville, you have blinders on. I do not need to travel to Greenville to observe the data collected.

This is all data about Obesity in South Carolina. Actual facts. Things grown ups use when they discuss issues:

Obesity in SC
South Carolina State Obesity Data, Rates and Trends: The State of Obesity
http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/stateprog...te-profile.pdf
http://www.scaledown.org/pdf/sc-obesity-action-plan.pdf

This is actual data from government organizations regarding obesity among the poor:
Products - Data Briefs - Number 51 - November 2010
Childhood Obesity Facts | Child | Data | Obesity | DNPAO | CDC


Bye now. I'm done here.
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Old 05-09-2016, 04:30 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,518 posts, read 3,926,778 times
Reputation: 2825
THere are obese people all over the country and the world. It isn't specific to SC or specific to Greenville. There are actually more obese people in more populated states than here, even if the percentage of population is higher here. In my view, the total number of obese people is more significant than the percentage of population.

Those obesity stats are based on a small sample size of people who were surveyed over the phone or in person, and in some cases their weight and height and BMI was recorded. The obesity stats are not based on diagnoses by physicians and the real number of obese people in the state or city.

You and others gave several anecdotes about there are a lot of obese people in Greenville. You specifically talked about driving around in a truck. No specific number was given like 1 out out of 5 or 4 out of 5 people in Greenville are obese. No sample size of obese people was given. We did not learn the period of time that you and others spent in Greenville or Easley or Greer or TR. Was it 30 minutes, a day, a week, a year, 5 years, 10 years, etc?

I don't have blinders on if I have not observed a high number of obese people in Greenville over a long period of time, 17 years. I have lived in Greenvlle for 17 years. If you are asserting there are tons of obese people here, in terms of probablity, I should see a lot of obese people all the time.

You post on the SC and Charleston forum a lot, but you don't post in the Greenville forum, so I do find it odd that obesity levels in Greenville is something that you are talking about now, given you live 3.5 hours from Greenville. You took glee in posting a link to an article claiming Greenville has high prevalence of obesity. I don't understand your motivation for doing so.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 05-09-2016 at 05:20 PM..
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Old 05-09-2016, 06:20 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,850,641 times
Reputation: 3485
What this thread fails to understand is that not being obese doesnt equal being healthy.

1. Mental health. We all know the deal. The brain is a powerful organ.

2. Your weight does not completely correlate with how healthy you are. You can look like a SI swimsuit model, but if you smoke 20 packs a day every day, you are in no better shape than the 400 pounder.

It all depends on metabolism. Everyones body is different. I can eat Cheetos, Doritos, and Fritos every day and I will not gain a pound. Believe me, I've tried, but I cant pack on pounds to save my life. But just because I cant get fat, does that mean im ultra healthy? Hell no. I'd be just as bad off, you just couldnt physically see it, but internally, I would be in trouble.

There is a bigger picture here. Income levels, race, age, sex, etc, its bigger than this. This whole thread is moot, because the article is talking strictly obesity, but obesity is not the issue.

Did you know that people can get a fatal heart attack just by shoveling snow? That is something no South Carolinian has to worry about, but a lot of the country does. A lot of Americans have to deal with the stress of sitting in 2 hour rush hour traffic on 14 lane highways. Do SC-linians? Nope. Los Angeles is a beautiful city and a lot of Angelenos look like models, but the air still sucks and we all still have lungs. Here in SC for the most part, we can breathe. We dont have to worry about 200 days of overcast either.

I'm sure some people would rather be obese and lazy then having to do with a super stressful high corporate job with 4 hours of rush hour, crammed in a flourescently lit cubicle, with money the only object.

Health is not this simple.
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Old 05-09-2016, 07:21 PM
 
1,469 posts, read 1,932,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
i question the theory that poverty and obesity are linked. i've seen a lot of poor people over the years and the majority were not obese. Poor people who are obese are so for the same reasons as rich and iddle class, genetics, calorie consumption, and sedentary lifestyle, or a combination of these.

Being poor should make it harder to consume too many calories, for example a huge coke at burger king is like 2 dollars, if you don't have much money you probably not going to spend 2 bucks on a large coke.

I've stopped at this Quicktrip in Easley in numerous times, it is the best gas station in Easley by far, it does a booming business, I did not see any obesity despite your contention that everybody or most everybody in Easley is poor.
This thread has gotten out of control. Some of the arguments are logically flawed, and others are just ill-informed. I suspect that this is my last time replying to this thread. However, I did want to say that the link between poverty and obesity is not theoretical -- it's empirical. It would behoove you to read some research published in medical or public health journals. Knowledge really is power!
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Old 05-09-2016, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,518 posts, read 3,926,778 times
Reputation: 2825
How do you explain all the poor people who aren't obese then? A greater prevalence of obesity in poor people does not mean poverty caused their obesity. What causes their obesity is the same thing that causes obesity in rich and middle class people. Excessive calorie consumption, sedentary lifestyle, and / or genetics.

Also, can you provide evidence that you are physician or healthcare professional who deals directly with obesity? Why do I need to research obesity if I am not a physician and I don't deal with obese people? Why is other people's weight my concern? There is nothing that I can do about it.

How does linking poverty to obesity actually solve obesity? The solution to obesity is the same for obese people regardless of their income. I don't see how their income is even relevant. Let's say that we learned people with blue eyes have a greater prevalence of obesity. So what? How is this useful data if the solutions to obesity is the same for people of all eye colors.

If we were to give a poor obese person a million dollars or a high paying job, does that mean they will lose weight even if they don't change anything about their lifestyle and/or it is a genetic thing?

I have researched obesity enough to know that there is a genetic component in many if not most cases. If there is a genetic component, then the obesity exists regardless of income.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 05-09-2016 at 07:54 PM..
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,518 posts, read 3,926,778 times
Reputation: 2825
Here is an article from Pew Research Center. Obesity and poverty don’t always go together | Pew Research Center

Obesity varies considerably depending on gender, race, ethnicity and socioeconomic factors. In 2010, CDC researchers (using data from 2005-08) found that among black and Mexican-American men, obesity increased with income: 44.5% and 40.8% of those men are obese, respectively, at the highest income level, compared with 28.5% and 29.9% at the lowest level.Beyond that, though, the researchers found little correlation between obesity prevalence among men and either income or education.


Even Pew is conflating overweight with being obese because no way are 45 percent of black man obese. Obese is severely overweight, not just overweight.

I read somewhere that by government's definition of obesity, a person like Brad Pitt is obese.
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:24 PM
 
1,469 posts, read 1,932,335 times
Reputation: 22487
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
How do you explain all the poor people who aren't obese then? A greater prevalence of obesity in poor people does not mean poverty caused their obesity. What causes their obesity is the same thing that causes obesity in rich and middle class people. Excessive calorie consumption, sedentary lifestyle, and / or genetics.

Also, can you provide evidence that you are physician or healthcare professional who deals directly with obesity? Why do I need to research obesity if I am not a physician and I don't deal with obese people? Why is other people's weight my concern? There is nothing that I can do about it.

How does linking poverty to obesity actually solve obesity? The solution to obesity is the same for obese people regardless of their income. I don't see how their income is even relevant. Let's say that we learned people with blue eyes have a greater prevalence of obesity. So what? How is this useful data if the solutions to obesity is the same for people of all eye colors.

If we were to give a poor obese person a million dollars or a high paying job, does that mean they will lose weight even if they don't change anything about their lifestyle and/or it is a genetic thing?

I have researched obesity enough to know that there is a genetic component in many if not most cases. If there is a genetic component, then the obesity exists regardless of income.
To use a different example, there is not a causal connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Undeniably, however, cigarette smoking is highly correlated with lung cancer. Of course, everyone who smokes cigarettes will not develop lung cancer. Everyone who is poor is not obese.


Poverty and obesity are highly correlated. I do not want you to misconstrue this point. I am not suggesting that being poor automatically makes one obese. Multiple factors play a role in obesity, and poverty is one of them. But, how does poverty play a role? M1a1mg already provided you with one key factor. Foods that are heavily processed, high in fat, and high in sugar tend to be cheap. When you live in poverty you buy foods that you can afford, which often can be the aforementioned. See the connection? Really, this is not rocket science.

Last edited by davey123; 05-09-2016 at 08:33 PM..
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Old 05-09-2016, 08:26 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,518 posts, read 3,926,778 times
Reputation: 2825
People have been trying to make connection b/t poverty and obesity for 15 years at least, yet obesity still exists. This knowledge, if accurate, does not lead to any new solutions.

So why it is so important to connect the two.

I don't think poverty is to obesity is the same as smoking and carcinogens is to cancer. Carcinogens are toxins in the body.

All the non-obese poor people are significant evidence that poverty does not lead to obesity. Poverty does not make one drink too many sodas or live a sedentary lifesytle.

Sodas, pizza, etc in generall are not cheap. A large soda at a fast food place can be 2 dollars. They might charge you 25 cents if that for a water. If people own a home, they have water they can drink. This is obviously cheaper than buying sodas.

It is also true that healthy foods are often as cheap as any junk food. If you shop at grocery stores vs eating at fast food places, you save money.

The CDC's own research as reported by Pew, that I posted above, contradicts your contention that obesity and poverty are linked.

I propose that the biggest increase in obesity levels as been the result of soda consumption and people of all incomes drink sodas.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 05-09-2016 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 05-10-2016, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
264 posts, read 155,844 times
Reputation: 215
I thought about this thread while I was eating at a Chinese buffet for lunch today.

Last edited by wedge71; 05-10-2016 at 01:50 PM..
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