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Old 09-25-2020, 09:32 AM
 
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Small towns that have private / prep (what use to be called or are in some cases still referred to as segregationist schools / academies) are a good place to look. Orangeburg comes to mind, as does Kingstree. Small rural towns in the lower part of the state primarily where the overall household income is low but there exists a socioeconomic class that can afford to pay thousands of dollars a year to send their kids to the local private "christian" school.

Manning, SC in Clarendon County is one of the poorest communities in the state in terms of per capita income but is home to Laurence Manning Academy. 1 in 4 families is below the poverty live and 1 in 3 people overall live below that same line. Arguably there is still some generational wealth in these areas of the state.
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Old 09-25-2020, 09:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mrpeatie View Post
FWIW- when a lot of the wealth was found in rural areas it was in no way a robust upper class. Their was very much a top tear of planter society and everyone else fell behind (if they were functionally or even literally free.) You would have fabulously wealthy people living in poor areas. I still see a lot of that in smaller towns where successful business or land owners do very, very well while the area as a whole is depressed. Sometimes it is in the form of rich families that maintain farms/hunter land-cabins as their 2nd/3rd homes.
I live in the upstate but every now and then find myself in the Pee Dee region of the state and have noticed that the antebellum "big house" still exists in these areas of the state. Lot after lot of single wide, about to fall over homes stretched out along various rural routes and then almost out of nowhere a beacon of light, if you will, shining bright surrounded by economic darkness. Brick homes with pearly white columns surrounded by tracks of land as if the "massa" himself still lived there.
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Old 09-25-2020, 02:06 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greenvillebuckeye View Post
Small towns that have private / prep (what use to be called or are in some cases still referred to as segregationist schools / academies) are a good place to look. Orangeburg comes to mind, as does Kingstree. Small rural towns in the lower part of the state primarily where the overall household income is low but there exists a socioeconomic class that can afford to pay thousands of dollars a year to send their kids to the local private "christian" school.
I think most of the 'segregation academies' have always been pretty bare bones as far as private schools go. Often tuition was priced such that most lower-middle class whites in the area could afford to attend. Maybe some have evolved to be more elite and expensive since the '60s though.
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Old 09-25-2020, 09:42 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HDWill1 View Post
I think most of the 'segregation academies' have always been pretty bare bones as far as private schools go. Often tuition was priced such that most lower-middle class whites in the area could afford to attend. Maybe some have evolved to be more elite and expensive since the '60s though.
This is true. A quick look up of annual tuition rates is pretty low but still higher than what the general population of these communities can afford to spend on school.
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Old 09-26-2020, 07:18 AM
Status: "Fiery But Mostly Peaceful" (set 12 days ago)
 
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In my experience, the public schools in SC were essentially segregated once in the classrooms.

I didn't know about half my high school class because I never had any classes with them.

It seems more likely some people send their kids to private schools because they don't think the public schools do a good job teaching kids based on their very low school scores. Schools with low school scores also likely have more disruptive students.

Given the weight many parents put on college rankings like US News, it makes sense a lot of parents would also not want to send their kids to schools with low school scores.

Last edited by Huckleberry Knob; 09-26-2020 at 07:27 AM..
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Old Today, 05:07 AM
 
Location: Charleston, SC
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There's some large plantation style homes in and around the ACE basin area. Not very populated as everyone owns large swaths of land. Check out some of the riverfront homes around 17 and the Ashepoo river...
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