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Unread 08-01-2010, 10:30 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Unhappy International Space Station's Cooling System Suddenly Shuts Down.

One of two ammonia-fed cooling loops suddenly shut down on the International Space Station this Saturday when a circuit breaker for the pump suddenly tripped; the loops are used to keep the station's electronics from overheating and there is no imminent danger.

When they attempted to restart the pump the circuit breaker tripped off again; this will necessitate 2 spacewalks to replace the faulty pump with one of two extras that are stored outside the ISS. Gyroscopes, the GPS system and several power converters are also affected by this problem.

Space station cooling system suddenly shuts down | Science Headlines | Comcast.net (http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-science/20100801/International.Space.Station/ - broken link)

International Space Station - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

File:International Space Station after undocking of STS-132.jpg - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia .
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Unread 08-02-2010, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
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I worked on the PVTCS and the EEATCS in the late 1990s as part of my ISS EPS efforts. When I first read this headline I thought it might generate a need for additional shuttle missions.
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Unread 08-02-2010, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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From what I read there are two extra ammonia pumps stored outside the ISS; but they say it will take 2 spacewalks to complete replacement and repairs to the system.....lucky and/or prepared this time......sending up a replacement pump on such short notice would probably be very difficult and I assume we would have to rely on Russia to get the parts there relatively quickly.
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Unread 08-02-2010, 11:25 PM
 
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I hope they get it fixed.

Gotta be cool but scary to be sitting up there. I'd be amazed if they can get the ISS to stay up there for TEN more years.
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Unread 08-03-2010, 09:26 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Infinite loop View Post
I hope they get it fixed.

Gotta be cool but scary to be sitting up there. I'd be amazed if they can get the ISS to stay up there for TEN more years.
With the large monetary and man-hour investment in the ISS I would hope that the international community keeps the station running as long as possible.
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Unread 08-12-2010, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles View Post
I worked on the PVTCS and the EEATCS in the late 1990s as part of my ISS EPS efforts. When I first read this headline I thought it might generate a need for additional shuttle missions.
I'm curious about the tradeoff between cooling and heating needs. I recall when the Apollo 13 Command Module was shut down the problem was the very low temperatures inside the Module. But for the ISS the problem seems to be the opposite, insufficient cooling. Is it the electronics that are producing excess heat that must be removed?
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Unread 08-13-2010, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nesper View Post
I'm curious about the tradeoff between cooling and heating needs. I recall when the Apollo 13 Command Module was shut down the problem was the very low temperatures inside the Module. But for the ISS the problem seems to be the opposite, insufficient cooling. Is it the electronics that are producing excess heat that must be removed?
Yes...that is my understanding that the electronics can overheat along with the space station itself; but I may be wrong with the latter assumption.

I agree...it does not make sense in a way; but with all the equipment running and the station orientated so that the solar panels get the maximum amount of sunlight, perhaps this exasperates the heat issue and I'm sure the ISS insulation is far superior than Apollo technology.

On a side note...the first space walk was essentially a failure and two additional extra "vehicular excursions" are deemed necessary. Let's keep our fingers crossed.
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Unread 08-13-2010, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PITTSTON2SARASOTA View Post
On a side note...the first space walk was essentially a failure and two additional extra "vehicular excursions" are deemed necessary. Let's keep our fingers crossed.
I recall an old study when the ISS was still on the drawing boards, concluding that the number of EVAs and shuttle missions needed, and the shuttle reliability, would make the risk unacceptably high. We've lost two shuttles, which is a real tragedy, but nothing near what that study suggested.

On cooling and heating, I worked on a couple of spacecraft designs that used passive cooling, and it's surprising how cold it can get inside a spacecraft when you radiate heat out passively and insulate the electronics. A spacecraft is like a device with a blowtorch on one side (the sun) and dry ice (cold space) on the other side. If you get heat in or out just a little faster than it gets out or in, temperatures can get very extreme.
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Unread 08-16-2010, 12:18 PM
 
Location: Sarasota, Florida
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nesper View Post
I recall an old study when the ISS was still on the drawing boards, concluding that the number of EVAs and shuttle missions needed, and the shuttle reliability, would make the risk unacceptably high. We've lost two shuttles, which is a real tragedy, but nothing near what that study suggested.

On cooling and heating, I worked on a couple of spacecraft designs that used passive cooling, and it's surprising how cold it can get inside a spacecraft when you radiate heat out passively and insulate the electronics. A spacecraft is like a device with a blowtorch on one side (the sun) and dry ice (cold space) on the other side. If you get heat in or out just a little faster than it gets out or in, temperatures can get very extreme.
I know/understand your point.....like Mercury..... where one side always faces the sun....the other does not. Yet even though it is so close to our sun the temperature differences are extreme nonetheless.

I have not heard any further developments on the problem...here is NASA's newest link that I can find>>>>> And others>>>>>

NASA: ISS Cooling System Failure ‘Significant’ | US Post Today.

ISS cooling system failure forces spacewalk repairs | TG Daily

SPACE.com -- FAQ: International Space Station Cooling System Pump Failure .
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Unread 08-16-2010, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Virginia
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Success!
Astronauts Revive Space Station's Cooling System

Astronauts Revive Space Station's Cooling System - ABC News
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